Traditional calligraphy – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 18:34:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://logprotect.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-29T151759.208-150x150.png Traditional calligraphy – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ 32 32 Ukrainian showcases Taiwan-Ukrainian friendship through street art https://logprotect.net/ukrainian-showcases-taiwan-ukrainian-friendship-through-street-art/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 14:51:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/ukrainian-showcases-taiwan-ukrainian-friendship-through-street-art/ Taipei, June 20 (CNA) A street art piece of two cartoon cats shaking hands has appeared on the wall of an abandoned building in Odessa, Ukraine, just 50 meters from the Chinese Consulate General, end of April. Street art and graffiti are commonplace in cities around the world, especially on abandoned buildings, of which there […]]]>

Taipei, June 20 (CNA) A street art piece of two cartoon cats shaking hands has appeared on the wall of an abandoned building in Odessa, Ukraine, just 50 meters from the Chinese Consulate General, end of April.

Street art and graffiti are commonplace in cities around the world, especially on abandoned buildings, of which there are unfortunately many more since Russia invaded Ukraine in late February. In this artwork, one of the two cats on the wall in question is familiarly comforting to Taiwanese nationals viewing the image online.

Both cats are dressed in dresses with similar color schemes and patterns, except the cat on the left is dressed much more simply while the other cat wears a sleeveless vest proudly decorated with the Chinese characters for Taiwan written in calligraphy.

Interested netizens and discerning passers-by in Odessa will find that with its distinguished clothes and facial tattoos, the cat on the right represents the indigenous Atayal people of Taiwan, while the other feline wears the traditional Ukrainian Vyshyvanka, in colors that reflect his companion’s clothing. . Between them is the Ukrainian word “pidtrymka (підтримка)”, meaning “support”, written in the nation’s signature blue.

Man with a plan

“One day, after the war started, I wanted to find out who was helping Ukraine in the world,” the street art benefactor told CNA in an exclusive interview. “I found Taiwan in the list of helpers. My decision was quick. Ukraine must respond to such help.”

The painting was commissioned by the 30-year-old who asked to be identified as Evghen. According to Evghen, he has a degree in chemistry and has worked in the quality control department of a pharmaceutical company for five years.

Prior to the invasion of Russia, Evghen said he planned to do something different. “Before the war, I had the idea of ​​opening a fast food cafe delivering onigiri (rice balls) but COVID-19 and Putin shit on my plans,” Evghen said.

Evghen went on to say that he decided to commission the painting not only as a sign of gratitude to Taiwan, but also to send a message to countries that face constant pressure from despotic neighbors to stick together. elbows.

“A big thank you to all Taiwanese people who, in this difficult time, chose a few Taiwanese dollars for the people of my country. I hope Ukraine will remember who their true friends are and who are not,” said- he declared.

To express his gratitude, Evghen searched for popular Ukrainian street art group LBWS on Instagram and asked them to create the image using the humorous idea of ​​what he called “Taiwan and Ukraine vs. wrong”.

Members of Evghen and LBWS chose the Atayal people from a shortlist including the Taroko and Saisiyat peoples of the nation due to the former’s similarity in clothing to that of the Ukrainian Vyshyvanka.

Evghen told CNA that he originally wanted LBWS to paint the graphic on the wall of the Chinese consulate, but decided against it after realizing the extent of the problem it could cause. On April 22, street art appeared on the wall of an abandoned building 50 meters from the consulate.

“I think right now you know why I wanted to paint Ukraine-Taiwan,” Evghen said. “Also, I heard the sad news from Beijing about a new law on the armed forces. Be Taiwan aware and stick together.”

The artistic group behind the brush

The Ukraine-Taiwan cat street art was created by LBWS, an art group who also accepted an interview with CNA about themselves and their realization of Evghen’s idea.

“We are a group of street performers from Odessa, Ukraine,” the group’s spokesperson told CNA. “Our name is LBWS. We started painting in 2004 when I was 14 years old.”

The group identifies itself as a team of non-public artists whose name is an acronym made up of letters representing each of its members. They are like-minded friends who love art and have gone from illegal graffiti on trains and walls to more artistic products that have taken on a life of their own. Indeed, their brand can now be found in Greece, Azerbaijan, Germany, Poland and other countries.

“We are a group of artists,” said the anonymous LBWS spokesperson. “Usually our gallery is on the street. Sometimes we also sell our works, like canvases, sticker packs, sculptures.”

Unfortunately, the group said that when the war broke out, they were forced to change their creativity and style, which led them to launch the “LBWS CATS” series in 2021 as an artistic political movement to address relationships. of Ukraine with Russia.

According to LBWS, the movement further evolved after the February 24 Russian invasion into one that aims to lift national morale and civil spirit, with more than 100 graphics across Ukraine.

“I know that Taiwanese citizens, in cooperation with Ukrainians abroad, collected tons of humanitarian aid and sent it to Ukraine months ago,” the spokesperson said of the statement. photo Ukraine-Taiwan “#TaiwanStandWithUkrane did it”.

Asked about the inspiration behind choosing cats as their movement’s mascot, the spokesperson simply replied, “It’s easy. Ukrainians love cats.

Charity through Art and Fellowship

Currently, LBWS has authorized the non-profit organization “Taiwan Stands With Ukraine” to print the Ukraine-Taiwan cats graphic on T-shirts for charity purposes.

Chang Yun-tsui (張芸翠), the head of the project in Taiwan, said that all the money from the sale of the T-shirts will go to funding future LBWS projects as well as helping refugees from the Ukrainian town. from Mariupol.

She said the photo is a symbolic milestone in Taiwan-Ukraine relations, and nearly half of the 160 printed T-shirts have been sold.

Chang also added that the reason for profit sharing with Mariupol is a Ukrainian national from the city who is currently in Taiwan. The anonymous person started the charity movement after losing contact with both of her parents shortly after the war began and has since helped more than 300 refugees, she said.

Unfortunately, as the war drags on, people will become less willing to donate even though refugees will continue to need help, Chang said.

She said the organization had received several requests from mothers to help them feed their children or get gasoline to power their vehicles in order to escape.

Chang went on to encourage people to continue their humanitarian efforts, adding that even just US$100 (NT$2,974) could change the life of a refugee family.

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An exhibit on eastern Japan shows the city’s close ties to scholar Donald Keene through the haiku poet https://logprotect.net/an-exhibit-on-eastern-japan-shows-the-citys-close-ties-to-scholar-donald-keene-through-the-haiku-poet/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 00:05:35 +0000 https://logprotect.net/an-exhibit-on-eastern-japan-shows-the-citys-close-ties-to-scholar-donald-keene-through-the-haiku-poet/ Artifacts are displayed at the ‘Donald Keene’s Ties to Soka City Exhibition’ in Saitama prefecture on June 17, 2022. (Mainichi/Chinami Takeichi) SOKA, Saitama — An exhibit in the city of Soka in Saitama Prefecture, north of Tokyo, celebrates the birth month of the late Japanese literary scholar Donald […]]]>






Artifacts are displayed at the ‘Donald Keene’s Ties to Soka City Exhibition’ in Saitama prefecture on June 17, 2022. (Mainichi/Chinami Takeichi)

SOKA, Saitama — An exhibit in the city of Soka in Saitama Prefecture, north of Tokyo, celebrates the birth month of the late Japanese literary scholar Donald Keene through a collection of photos and artifacts that show his connection to the city, as well as a 17th-century haiku master.

The “Exhibit on Donald Keene’s Connections to the City of Soka” is held in the city’s “Zenso-an Hakutai no Kakaku (Travellers of a Hundred Ages)” facility. Since his first visit in 1988, Keene had continued to visit the city for about 30 years, giving lectures and participating in other events. What brought the city and Keene together was haiku poet Matsuo Basho’s major work “Oku no Hosomichi” or “The Narrow Road to Oku”.

The Soka area was once a post town along the Nikko Kaido road, where many travelers including Basho passed through or stayed during the Edo period (1603-1867). Several centuries after Basho’s epic journey, Keene translated the work into English. According to Keene’s translation, a passage reads: “I continued my journey to a post town called Soka which we could hardly reach on the day of our departure.” Keene named the installation Zenso-an using the kanji characters from this passage.






A hanging scroll with calligraphy by Donald Keene and an illustration by artist Kiro Uehara are displayed at the “Donald Keene’s Ties to Soka City Exhibition” in Saitama Prefecture, June 17, 2022. (Mainichi /Chinami Takeichi)

In addition to Keene’s photos from his visits to Soka, there are works on display using Matsuo Basho’s motif. This includes hanging scrolls and framed papers, which are collaborations between Keene and her adopted son Seiki’s brother, Kiro Uehara. Some of the works are said to include sketches based on Kiro’s imagination of what Keene would look like if he were Matsuo Basho.

Also in a corner of the traditional one-story wooden building is a table Keene received as a gift from the wife of Yukio Mishima, one of the renowned Japanese writers Keene befriended during his lifetime. . A cassette player and CDs of his favorite opera singer Maria Callas, which were borrowed from Keene’s Tokyo home, along with a Metropolitan Opera cap, books and a replica of his manuscripts were placed on the table, with his umbrella and his jacket hung up. the nearby wall. It was as if the scholar himself was sitting in the chair with his beloved objects close at hand.






A calligraphy artwork by Donald Keene and an illustration by artist Kiro Uehara are displayed at the “Donald Keene’s Ties to Soka City Exhibit” in Saitama prefecture on June 17, 2022. Uehara is said to have drawn the illustration based on what he imagined Keene would look like if he were Matsuo Basho. (Mainichi/Chinami Takeichi)

Yoshio Soai, general manager of the Soka City Cultural Association, which hosts the exhibit, was responsible for picking up Keene from his Tokyo home ahead of an event at Soka. He said that although he was extremely nervous about meeting the eminent scholar for the first time, he relaxed when he opened the door and saw a familiar-looking statuette of Basho – a trophy awarded to winners of the city’s literature prize, which Keene also helped establish.

Soai commented, “Although I remember being scared and thinking Keene was out of my league, I saw him smile sweetly whenever he joined events around town where students were reciting chants. passages from Oku no Hosomichi. The photos of him on display also show this charming side of him.”

The exhibition will continue until June 27, with the installation open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free entry. The Zenso-an facility is a five-minute walk from the east exit of Dokkyodaigakumae Soka-Matsubara Station.

(By Mainichi main writer Chinami Takeichi)

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Remembering the hectic daily life in Syria before the war | cultural | Report on arts, music and lifestyle in Germany | DW https://logprotect.net/remembering-the-hectic-daily-life-in-syria-before-the-war-cultural-report-on-arts-music-and-lifestyle-in-germany-dw/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:38:30 +0000 https://logprotect.net/remembering-the-hectic-daily-life-in-syria-before-the-war-cultural-report-on-arts-music-and-lifestyle-in-germany-dw/ For nearly four months, images of bombs, destruction and death in Ukraine have shocked the world. As a result, the Assad regime’s war in Syria – now in its 11th year – has seemingly faded into the background and out of the headlines. Yet photos and videos of bombed-out Syrian cities and destroyed cultural sites […]]]>

For nearly four months, images of bombs, destruction and death in Ukraine have shocked the world. As a result, the Assad regime’s war in Syria – now in its 11th year – has seemingly faded into the background and out of the headlines. Yet photos and videos of bombed-out Syrian cities and destroyed cultural sites by so-called Islamic State militants, which have permeated the media for the past decade, have made a lasting impression.

Today, an exhibition at the Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum in Cologne attempts to bring a different image of Syria to the forefront of minds. “Syria — Against Forgetting” tells the story of a very different Syria — a Syria with vibrant daily life, a rich artistic history, and the peaceful coexistence of people from different cultures and religions.

The exhibition also focuses on the religious traditions of Syria

“The main goal is not to talk about the war,” says archaeologist Jabbar Abdullah, who curated the exhibit. In recent years, media coverage has focused exclusively on the horrors that have taken place, he says, but his homeland is much more than that. “We want to show a different Syria and give Syrians a positive memory of their homeland.”

The exhibition includes historical artifacts from the earliest eras of mankind, which are on loan from other German collections. There is also the art of calligraphy and a space where visitors can learn about the different dialects and styles of traditional clothing in Damascus, Aleppo and Raqqa.

Visitors to the exhibition can also learn about religion in Syria. Particular attention is paid to Judaism, which, Abdullah points out, has a long tradition in Syria. “Unfortunately, Judaism was not allowed to be a main topic for decades,” he says. Pogroms against Jews took place in Syria in 1947, and many Jews left the country in the early 1990s. Today, the only synagogue in the country is in Damascus.

Two men look at books in a library of the Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum

The long history of Judaism in Syria is an important part of a new exhibition in Cologne

Student during the Arab Spring

Abdullah, now 32, grew up near Raqqa. He was studying at Aleppo University when the Arab Spring reached Syria and the regime bloodily suppressed student protests. In 2013, he fled to Egypt, later earning his master’s degree in Alexandria. “Europe was not on my mind at the time,” he says.

Jabbar Abdullah speaks on a podium in a striped shirt.

Archaeologist Jabbar Abdullah curated the exhibition in Cologne

But after the military coup, the security situation in the country deteriorated rapidly. Abdullah traveled to Turkey and then to Bulgaria, where he stayed for a year until arriving in Cologne in 2014. He wrote about his experiences in the book “Raqqa am Rhein” (Raqqa on the Rhine), published in 2020.

Adapt to a new reality

Abdullah has many fond memories of life in Syria before the violence began. “I started doing excavations in my village when I was a child,” he says. He associates this happy childhood with big dreams and a bright future in his native country. Yet, that did not happen. “All of a sudden you find yourself living in a new social system,” he says.

Adapting to German life and integrating into society was a given for Abdullah, but even after eight years in Germany, some customs still seem foreign to him. “At birthdays, everyone gets up or sits down in small groups; in Syria, everyone sits around a big table,” he notes.

A cork model of a structure in the ancient city of Palmyra.

The ancient city of Palmyra in Syria, visible as a cork model above, was almost completely destroyed by the militant group ISIS

Attacks on culture

The title of the exhibition, “Against Oblivion”, highlights how the constant images of Syria’s horror and destruction have made people forget what the country looked like before the war – and also how many Westerners knew little about Syria before the war. A similar realization is currently occurring with regard to the conflict in Ukraine.

Between 2015 and 2017, terrorist militias from the so-called Islamic State destroyed the UNESCO World Heritage Site in the ancient city of Palmyra, including the Roman-built Tetrapyl and Temple of Baal; today, Russian missiles are targeting Ukrainian cultural sites. Just as cultural heritage is destroyed, so are the memories of history and tradition.

“We must save the young generation”

Abdullah has since acquired German citizenship. He says that a few years ago he wanted to return to his native country when the war ended to help rebuild the country. Not much remains of these plans.

“We are hopeless,” he said. He does not believe that the Assad regime’s regime will end. The political influences on the country, currently threatened by another conflict with Turkey, are too strong.

Abdullah says it is important to help from outside, for initiatives to build schools and kindergartens to ensure children can get an education. “We have to save this young generation because they will be very important for Syria in 20 years,” he said.

He is “very concerned” that the situation in his homeland will continue to fade from international political attention as the war in Ukraine continues. And if he approves of Germany’s support for Ukrainian refugees, he nevertheless perceives some worrying elements.

“It’s great what Germany is doing for Ukrainians fleeing the war,” Abdullah said, highlighting how Ukrainian refugees get help with bureaucracy, quick access to work and language lessons. and are often housed in apartments instead of collective shelters. .

But, he points out, such scenarios rarely existed for Syrian and other refugees who arrived in 2015. Differentiation is dangerous, says Abdullah: “If aid only applies to certain groups, I don’t I don’t feel like I belong.

The exhibition “Syria — Against Forgetting”, at the Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum, is visible until September 11, 2022.

This article was translated from German by Sarah Hucal.

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June’s edition of London Fashion Week was brief, but packed with punch – WWD https://logprotect.net/junes-edition-of-london-fashion-week-was-brief-but-packed-with-punch-wwd/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:03:24 +0000 https://logprotect.net/junes-edition-of-london-fashion-week-was-brief-but-packed-with-punch-wwd/ LONDON – Hybrid London Fashion Week which ended on Monday was a wink and miss you showcase with few designers showing off their wares, but those who attended including Martine Rose and Priya Ahluwalia made an impression. Rose drew large crowds for her first physical show after the COVID-19 pandemic on Sunday at Vauxhall, south […]]]>

LONDON – Hybrid London Fashion Week which ended on Monday was a wink and miss you showcase with few designers showing off their wares, but those who attended including Martine Rose and Priya Ahluwalia made an impression.

Rose drew large crowds for her first physical show after the COVID-19 pandemic on Sunday at Vauxhall, south of the River Thames.

She offered elevated everyday wear with silly details, such as key rings dangling from pants and bags, or unslid pockets, unzipped pants, and models wearing earrings with l ‘packaging.

Her feminine looks were surprisingly sexy, especially those dresses with a broken back zipper.

“As I passed the last two years, I realized how my focus had become very detailed,” Rose said after the show.

“I was actually really worried because I’ve become so micro-focused. It was about fly openings and ill-fitting jackets and I was thinking, ‘Is this going to translate? is not a great silhouette.

“Then, of course, there is always the subtext of sex. I wanted it to be really sexy, and I think it was,” she added.

The designer took the opportunity to launch her new sneaker collaboration with Nike, a hybrid of Nike’s iconic Shox model and her own mule design, inspired by the concept of smart shoes.

After the show, Stavros Karelis, founder and chief purchasing officer of multi-brand retailer Machine-A, said he thought Rose deserved a “global” position.

He praised the designer’s ability “to create incredibly influential and commercially so accessible and successful collections. It makes her a leader in the game.”

According to industry sources, Rose is considered for the top designer position at Louis Vuitton for men. She declined to comment on the speculation.

But Rose is unlikely to sit on her laurels for long as London’s new generation is catching up fast. Some of them have overcome great challenges to organize physical presentations this month.

Looks from the AGR spring 2023 collection.
Courtesy

Alicia Robinson, creative director and founder of knitwear specialist AGR, decided to walk the runway in June because it works better for her brand.

“It was very difficult to find sponsors. No one really wants to do anything this season, and everyone wants to do something in September. But our business model is that we show in June and January and then we have our production delivery dates around that.

“We always try to deliver early so that we have the longest possible sales time as a new brand. I stick to choice,” she said.

Her Spring 2023 show at Fabric, the famous London nightclub, offered a burst of color with size-inclusive signature knits. It was perfect for the Pride Month parade, which takes place in London on July 2.

She also showcased exciting new items for the brand, such as recycled denim patchwork jackets and pants and metallic crochet dresses.

Robyn Lynch, meanwhile, offered a cheerful take on summer vacation dressing during a show at Old Truman Brewery in east London, followed by an after party with Labrum London.

Lynch said she was happy to stage a show, even though the week was low-key.

She wanted to produce “something I’m happy with, and just have fun doing it. And I think we got there,” Lynch said during a preview.

She added that since there was no official BFC location, she had to “completely guerrilla produce”, and hope the collection would speak for itself.

Three Looks From Robyn Lynch's Spring 2023 Collection

Three looks from Robyn Lynch’s Spring 2023 collection.
Courtesy

She did not disappoint.

Lynch has managed to incorporate elements of her fun, witty personality into her technical sportswear-inspired pieces and luxurious knits.

His collection featured designs and slogans, including “I caught crabs”, reworked from a T-shirt belonging to his mother Susan Lynch, who complained that her previous collection was all about her father.

Lynch was also inspired by the “ugliest, funniest and most charming souvenir” vintage t-shirts she bought on eBay while researching.

She thought, “How can I take these trashy, cheap, tacky T-shirts and make them really high? So we got these beautiful cotton yarns from Italy and knitted the pattern of the graphics into the shirt. They are all knitted and woven in jacquard. They have a super soft feel, but they’re still quite cheerful and playful,” she said.

A few designers searched for answers about the future and explored their respective heritage.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 11: A model walks the runway at the Labrum London fashion show during London Fashion Week June 2022 on June 11, 2022 in London, England.  (Photo by Kate Green/BFC/Getty Images for BFC)

A look from the Labrum London spring 2023 collection.
Getty Images for BFC

Foday Dumbuya, founder and creative director of Labrum London, was born in Sierra Leone and raised in London. His background inspired the collection, which featured a loose pajama-style fit and a mix of colors he borrowed from artist Mark Rothko.

“We always talk about freedom of movement, people have to move freely,” Dumbuya said from the sidelines, where his friends Idris Elba and Tinie Tempah joined him.

“We can bring our culture and merge it with another culture and then bring that explosion,” he said.

The show also came with subtle political messages. The designer collaborated with UK charity Choose Love on t-shirts that read “Designed by an Immigrant”.

Kasimi

Three looks from the Qasimi spring 2023 collection.
Kasimi

Hoor Al Qasimi, creative director of Qasimi, is looking to move forward with the brand that her late twin brother Khalid founded.

“Legacy isn’t just about what you leave behind. It’s also what you do in the future,” said the Emirati designer.

Indigo blue dominated the collection as a tribute to the Tuareg people of the Saharan desert who wear richly colored turbans and veils to protect themselves from desert sands and evil spirits.

There were embellished pieces inspired by pearl fishing in the Gulf; Arabic calligraphy that translates to ‘Desert Freedom’ and ‘Stranger’, and traditional basket weaving on pants and military jackets.

Ahluwalia spring 2023 collection

Ahluwalia spring 2023 collection
Ahluwalia

Designer Priya Ahluwalia turned to the 54 countries of Africa for her “Africa Is Limitless” collection.

The place was seeded with the tapestry rugs often found in South Asian and African homes, a personal nod to her dual Nigerian Indian heritage that continued into the collection.

The collection featured knit track jackets with sporty panels; denim twin sets printed with patterns found on Ankara wax print fabric and a T-shirt vest that read “Freedom to Indulge”.

Newcomer Carlota Barrera has found freedom in the great outdoors. She made her track debut at BaySixty6 Skate Park in Westbourne Park and aimed to emulate the busy streets of Cuba.

“You’re walking down a street, and you’re always hearing music and someone singing around the corner – and it mixes with the sound of dominoes and the screaming of children. All of those things are the sounds that remind me of Cuba,” Barrera said during a preview.

She played with fabrics often worn in Cuba – cotton, lyocell and linen – and combined them with raw silk and cotton. Fabrics were lightweight and silhouettes had a relaxed feel, echoing the more casual way people dress today.

Presentation Yuzéfi

Presentation Yuzéfi
Rowben Lantion/Courtesy

Meanwhile, handbag brand Yuzefi, which has 100 retailers worldwide, showcased a small selection of ready-to-wear and added knitwear to its list of sustainable sateens, cottons and linens.

Among the standout presentations on the digital program was Brandon Choi, whose humble couture collection included grand dresses and 18th-century styles in cardboard, tulle and sheer fabrics.

Lea Nyland Studio was another star of the program offering a range of lightweight, lace and crochet dresses and fabrics with raw edges. The boxy, whimsical shirts in Loss of Ego were pure bliss: some were adorned with 3D fabric sheets, while others had colorful kite strings dangling from them, and still others featured small scenes of beach.

A handful of buyers from Italy, Germany and the UK and stores including Nordstrom, Ssense and Bergdorf Goodman attended the three-day showcase.

Harry Fisher, founder of the Htown showroom, which represents sales of AGR, Ahluwalia and Saul Nash, said turnout was better than expected and designers did well to show off their menswear in early June, when buyers have larger budgets, and brands have more time to produce orders.

Thibaud Guyonnet, creative director and head of buying at Berlin-based retailer Voo Store, said he would never skip London, no matter how short.

“London is always fresh, fun and young. I love the vibe around the show,” Guyonnet said.

“It kicks off menswear month, and everyone is full of energy,” he said, adding that particularly strong designs came from brands such as AGR, Martine Rose and Ahluwalia and he would buy for the spring 2023 season.

Bruce Pask, director of menswear at Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus, said this edition of London Fashion Week proved that “London continues to be an important and inspiring city for menswear, both for its rich history in British sewing, knitting and manufacturing as well as for its exciting array of inventive new talent and fashion schools that are sources of incredible creativity and visions for the future of the genre.

“I also took the opportunity to make several studio visits to meet recently awarded young designers and see their work. London is a vital source of new voices in the fashion world and I want to make sure we are here to support, encourage and mentor them when we want to, and also be inspired by them and their work,” said he added.

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Shen Yun is an ‘absolutely magnificent performance’: Australian MP https://logprotect.net/shen-yun-is-an-absolutely-magnificent-performance-australian-mp/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 08:20:54 +0000 https://logprotect.net/shen-yun-is-an-absolutely-magnificent-performance-australian-mp/ ADELAIDE, Australia—Australian MP Erin Thompson said she learned more about authentic Chinese culture after seeing the international Shen Yun company perform at Adelaide’s Festival Theater on May 13. “We’re definitely learning a lot and I think it makes us want to ask more questions and learn more about Chinese culture and learn more about this […]]]>

ADELAIDE, Australia—Australian MP Erin Thompson said she learned more about authentic Chinese culture after seeing the international Shen Yun company perform at Adelaide’s Festival Theater on May 13.

“We’re definitely learning a lot and I think it makes us want to ask more questions and learn more about Chinese culture and learn more about this particular part of Chinese culture that we’ve only just discovered.” , Thompson said. said.

“I think there are a lot of Australians and other people around the world who don’t know about this part of Chinese culture, so it’s very important that we know what’s going on and can provide support. if necessary.”

Tammy Franks, House Leader of the Greens in South Australia, was also present.

Franks said China’s authentic culture is much more than the contemporary Chinese communist regime portrays it.

“I like to see Chinese culture. It’s wonderful that this is shared around the world and I certainly appreciate the artistry as well as the real culture.

Ancient China was once known as the “Land of the Divine”, and the traditional culture of China was believed to have descended from the heavens.

This was reflected in music, medicine, calligraphy, clothing, language and much more.

But this glorious culture was almost lost under communism.

“It is a very sad situation when you see that they are oppressed in various ways and people’s history is denied. And I know there have been absolute atrocities, but what a wonderful way to celebrate culture…with the arts today,” Franks added.

One article in particular points to modern China where people are persecuted for their faith, namely the persecution of Falun Dafa practitioners in China.

“Really taking contemporary events and telling them through the lens of traditional Chinese dance and culture is very powerful,” said Damian Wyld, counselor for Tea Tree Gully, South Australia, after watching Shen Yun in Adelaide on May 14.

“It very clearly shows the facts of this terrible persecution, which continues to happen in China, and helps the world understand what is going on there and what they can do about it,” Wyld added.

NTD News, Adelaide, Australia

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Taliban unveil new uniforms for reconstituted police https://logprotect.net/taliban-unveil-new-uniforms-for-reconstituted-police/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 13:24:27 +0000 https://logprotect.net/taliban-unveil-new-uniforms-for-reconstituted-police/ TALIBAN UNVEILS NEW UNIFORMS FOR RECONSTITUTED POLICE FORCE credits google Reformed Afghan Taliban Police receive new uniforms. New uniforms replace the republican flag with the flag of the Islamic emirate of the Taliban. 20,000 uniforms were created under contract with a local company. The new uniformed police force will be deployed in Kabul and Kandahar […]]]>

TALIBAN UNVEILS NEW UNIFORMS FOR RECONSTITUTED POLICE FORCE credits google

  • Reformed Afghan Taliban Police receive new uniforms.
  • New uniforms replace the republican flag with the flag of the Islamic emirate of the Taliban. 20,000 uniforms were created under contract with a local company.
  • The new uniformed police force will be deployed in Kabul and Kandahar provinces.

The Taliban’s reformed Afghan police received new uniforms on Wednesday as the de facto government tries to move away from using rebel military troops to maintain public order.

The Western-backed government and security forces disintegrated in the face of Taliban military advances when foreign forces withdrew last year, ending a 20-year conflict.

At a press conference, the Interior Ministry, overseen by Taliban leaders, revealed that a new uniform for the police had been prepared.
Significant differences were the color, which was now dark green instead of gray-blue, and the replacement of the tricolor republican flag of Afghanistan with the flag of the Islamic emirate of the Taliban on the new uniforms worn by some officers during the briefing.

The Taliban rejects the traditional republican flag, which was flown by Western-backed governments after foreign forces toppled the Taliban regime in 2001.

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When the Taliban ruled from 1996 to 2001, they used the flag of the Islamic emirate, which is white with black Arabic calligraphy reflecting the main tenet of Islam.

Mawlawi Noor Jalal Jalali, acting deputy interior minister, said a police force with new uniforms had been a key objective since taking office, but he did not specify how big it would be.

Abdul Nafi Takor, spokesman for the interior ministry, said 20,000 uniforms had been created under contract with a local company and another 100,000 would be produced in the coming weeks.

The new uniformed police force will initially be deployed in Kabul and Kandahar provinces.

The Taliban are trying to stop being an insurgent force, but they have employed their feared and relatively untrained fighters to restore law and order after the old police force was disbanded following the fall of the government.

According to Takor, the new force retained personnel but mostly inducted Taliban members.

More than 50,000 people have taken the short training courses and 400 officers have taken the extended course, according to Jalali.

Read also

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How flying a private jet could be CHEAPER than your normal flight https://logprotect.net/how-flying-a-private-jet-could-be-cheaper-than-your-normal-flight/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 04:52:11 +0000 https://logprotect.net/how-flying-a-private-jet-could-be-cheaper-than-your-normal-flight/ BEFORE you book your next flight, maybe ditch the cheap option and opt for something more private. And with long lines at the airport where passengers queue for hours, you could save money and time by opting for a private jet. You could get your own private plane for just a few hundred pounds eachCredit: […]]]>

BEFORE you book your next flight, maybe ditch the cheap option and opt for something more private.

And with long lines at the airport where passengers queue for hours, you could save money and time by opting for a private jet.

You could get your own private plane for just a few hundred pounds eachCredit: Alamy

Although it might seem out of reach for most families, seats on private planes might be a lot more affordable than you think – costing just a few hundred pounds.

The Just Jet website sells empty leg seats, which are empty flights that must operate to get planes from one place to another.

One of the cheapest options is from London to Jersey in July, which costs £3,500.

However, that’s all the flight for six people, or £583 per person.

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This also includes an open bar and full meal service – so although more expensive than some flights, it’s only a few hundred more than economy services.

Even cheaper is a London-Brussels flight next month, which costs £4,500 for eight passengers, or £562 per person.

The same flight in July costs up to £528 – so not much difference to your own private jet experience, when meals and drinks are included.

There are other routes across Europe that are slightly more expensive, including to Venice and Mallorca, although these also come with your own personal flight attendant.

For example, flights from Paris to Zurich or St Tropez to Ibiza will set you back £750.

Of course, although they’re not as cheap as some budget airlines, it also means you can include your luggage, plus free food and drink, which many airlines no longer offer. .

You can also charter an entire Ryanair plane, but it’s much more expensive, costing over £4,000.

Buying your own private jet is unfortunately out of the question – celebrities like Kylie Jenner, who have their own, cost up to $72 million.

We’ve revealed what it looks like in some of the private planes of the rich and famous.

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A private jet stewardess has revealed what it’s really like to fly this way.

Another couple have revealed how to fly private for less than a Ryanair ticket.

You Could Get Private Jet Life For Much Less Than You Think

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You Could Get Private Jet Life For Much Less Than You ThinkCredit: Alamy
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6 things to add to your travel bucket list in 2022 https://logprotect.net/6-things-to-add-to-your-travel-bucket-list-in-2022/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 16:33:21 +0000 https://logprotect.net/6-things-to-add-to-your-travel-bucket-list-in-2022/ A village walk in KumaonMountain stations aren’t the coolest cubbies they used to be. Sun-stricken travelers who once fled the plains are now fleeing the hill stations. Offering them sanctuary are remote rural idylls that live and breathe the true Pahadi air. Kumaon has some nice trails. One is a five-day trot on its northeast […]]]>

A village walk in Kumaon
Mountain stations aren’t the coolest cubbies they used to be. Sun-stricken travelers who once fled the plains are now fleeing the hill stations. Offering them sanctuary are remote rural idylls that live and breathe the true Pahadi air. Kumaon has some nice trails. One is a five-day trot on its northeast flanks, led by the brave people of Itmenaan Estate, near Almora. Winding upwards from Kathgodam, through the villages of Thikalna and Ganghet, where traditional houses have been renovated to receive guests, the village walk comes to its final stop, the century-old stone house of Itmenaan, pampered by ten acres of flowering pines, oaks and rhododendrons.

To learn more, see here.


The Great Ladakh Road Trip
Kashmir and Ladakh both make compelling arguments for long-distance driving holidays. But if fear of being stuck unaided (in case the car breaks down) has kept you from pressing the pedal, here’s your chance to roll around the corner. Adventures Overland has planned a 14 day trip to Ladakh via Manali. En route you will find Nubra Valley, Khardung La, Thiksey Monastery, Pangong Lake, Tiger Hill and Golden Temple, as well as the many rivers and high passes that make this one of the best routes in the world.

To learn more, see here.

Art in Kangra
A few weeks of Tibetan language lessons, or a mahamudra meditation spot, or learning calligraphy or ikebana in the green mountains of Kangra. Does this sound like a perfect, dignified summer vacation? You can do all this and more at Deer Park Institute in the small town of Bir in Himachal. Created in 2006, Deer Park is a project of Siddhartha’s Intent Society. It offers a multitude of artistic and cultural courses throughout the year completely free of charge (donations are however appreciated). From readings of ancient Tamil Buddhist literature to acting out Marathi folk tales, there’s hardly a dull moment, and you can even go paragliding or trekking in the Dhauladhar range.

To learn more, see here.

Hit Up Trail’s Pass
Of all the hundreds of possible treks in the Himalayas, arguably the best are those that cross the Himalayan range itself. And there are few as challenging or spectacular as the Traill Pass in Kumaon, which connects the watersheds of the Pindar and Gori Ganga rivers. A technical climb through the bergschrunds and ice cliffs of the Pindari Glacier, this pass is named after British administrator GW Traill, who crossed it in 1830 in an attempt to open a new trade route with Tibet. Watching Nanda Devi, Nanda Kot and a host of other Himalayan giants, Traill’s Pass, or Pindari Kanda, is a classic Himalayan trek. Aquaterra organizes this trek from July.

To learn more, see here.

A Tibetan art workshop

They have nine workshops including thangka painting, statue making, thangka applique, wood carving, applique, wood painting, sewing, weaving and screen printing. You will learn directly from masters and apprentices who specialize in these ancient art forms. They also have three guesthouses and two restaurants. Around the institute, you will find a multitude of cafes, restaurants and shops.

To learn more, see here.

Bike trip to Spiti


Wide spaces and a sturdy saddle are old friends. But when the road ends at Spiti and the peloton is led by Helmet Stories, the combination has plenty of torque. The outfit customizes luxury trips to several Himalayan outposts and the Western Ghats. But the journey to Spiti is one of a kind. The trail winds around Sangla and Kalpa in the Baspa Valley, stopping at Nako Lake before ending at Tabo, Dhangkar Monastery, Kaza and finally Tandi, perched at the confluence of the Chandra and Bhaga rivers. The final 100km stretch runs along (and often on) the riverbed, making it the perfect terrain for adventure motorcycling.

To learn more, see here.

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Auckland’s best vegetarian cuisine is hidden inside a grand Buddhist temple https://logprotect.net/aucklands-best-vegetarian-cuisine-is-hidden-inside-a-grand-buddhist-temple/ Tue, 31 May 2022 23:03:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/aucklands-best-vegetarian-cuisine-is-hidden-inside-a-grand-buddhist-temple/ I walk through manicured gardens beneath the intricate layers of a temple roof. Burning incense, tinkling chimes and the characteristic sound of a metal spatula hitting a wok complete the scene. I might be in Southeast Asia, but I’m in the middle of Southeast Auckland. The lavish Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Temple covers four hectares […]]]>

I walk through manicured gardens beneath the intricate layers of a temple roof. Burning incense, tinkling chimes and the characteristic sound of a metal spatula hitting a wok complete the scene.

I might be in Southeast Asia, but I’m in the middle of Southeast Auckland. The lavish Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Temple covers four hectares in the suburb of Flat Bush, making it the largest such temple in New Zealand.

The Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Temple is located in Flat Bush, Auckland.

Stephen Heard/Stuff

The Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Temple is located in Flat Bush, Auckland.

Officially opened in 2007 by the Venerable Master, the elaborate building is adapted from the design of the Tang Dynasty – the golden age of Chinese arts and culture – with touches like green tiles and tall brown pillars meant to project “magnificence, greatness, culture and strength”. This is definitely one hell of a building, and a hidden gem that I had no idea before, even in Auckland.

An attendant near the entrance tells me that about 8 or 9 monks inhabit the temple. She also reveals that spring is the best time to visit when the cherry trees that lead to the grand temple come out in full bloom.

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The temple takes its hat off to the Chinese Tang Dynasty design.

Stephen Heard/Stuff

The temple takes its hat off to the Chinese Tang Dynasty design.

The walk takes me on raised wooden platforms through autumnal cherry trees with words of wisdom hanging from golden bells attached to the branches. I see several monks draped in traditional dress throughout the property. One is praying in front of a huge shrine made from a single block of white jade; another features a Nutri-Grain offering on a statue – a bird lands.

There are several garden walks throughout the property.

Stephen Heard/Stuff

There are several garden walks throughout the property.

There’s a pagoda with its own water feature, a room where you can practice the cursive drawings of Chinese calligraphy, an art gallery covered in twinkling string lights, as well as a three-ton bell hanging from the ceiling. None of these attractions are why I came to the temple, but they certainly make me consider taking the rest of the afternoon to soak up the serenity.

One of the most popular features is found before you even enter the gripping yard. Tucked away to the left of the main entrance, across the gift shop selling jade statues and incense, is the temple cafe where nourishing vegetarian food is served quickly and steaming.

One of the temple's art galleries.

Stephen Heard/Stuff

One of the temple’s art galleries.

The Fo Guang Shan order has over 200 Water Drop Teahouse outposts around the world. Joining the long queue of visitors leaves plenty of time to look at the menu. There’s Water Drop’s signature bowl of pickled vegetables, barbecue wonton noodles, curry roti, steamed siu mai dumplings, noodle dishes and rice.

I opt for the laksa noodle soup ($15) and within minutes a steaming bowl arrives at my table. Previous encounters with the comfort food have almost always been meat-filled, where shrimp and chicken swim together in a rich coconut broth.

Laksa is a popular dish at Water Drop Teahouse.

Stephen Heard/Stuff

Laksa is a popular dish at Water Drop Teahouse.

Here, classic inclusions like fishballs have been swapped out for floating orbs of identically textured mushrooms. Soy-based char siu fake pork works like similar magic and could fool even the most stubborn carnivores. The dark orange broth is as rich, spicy and silky as you’d expect from laksa, with a generous packet of egg noodles tucked underneath.

The idea of ​​the cafe is to manifest Venerable Master Hsing Yun’s ideal of “compensating droplets of kindness with sources of gratitude”. A sure way to tap into the positive calming energy is to take a mediative walk through the gardens, explore the shrines, and then sit down in the wooden dining area.

The cafe is hidden near the main entrance.

Stephen Heard/Stuff

The cafe is hidden near the main entrance.

Fact sheet:

Find the Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Temple and Auckland Water Drop Teahouse at 16 Stancombe Road, Flat Bush, Manukau. It is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Appropriate attire must be worn when visiting the park. See: fgs.org.nz

Stay safe: New Zealand is currently under Covid-19 restrictions. Follow the instructions on covid19.govt.nz.

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Concerts at Sunset Beach, Southport https://logprotect.net/concerts-at-sunset-beach-southport/ Mon, 30 May 2022 10:04:37 +0000 https://logprotect.net/concerts-at-sunset-beach-southport/ Music is in the air, most certainly, as Sunset Beach Sound Waves and Southport Summer Concert kick off their concert series this week. But if you can’t make it to those concerts, don’t worry: there are more concerts and other events happening in Brunswick. Sunset Beach Sound Waves Concert Series The Entertainers are launching the […]]]>

Music is in the air, most certainly, as Sunset Beach Sound Waves and Southport Summer Concert kick off their concert series this week. But if you can’t make it to those concerts, don’t worry: there are more concerts and other events happening in Brunswick.

Sunset Beach Sound Waves Concert Series

The Entertainers are launching the Sunset Beach Sound Waves concert series featuring beach, R&B, rock, country and Top 40 music. The free concert will take place from 6-8 p.m. on Wednesday, June 1 at Village Park Gazebo, 1791 , Queen Anne Street.

The Back Porch Rockers will kick off Southport's summer concert series on Thursday.

Southport Summer Concert Series

Playing classic rock and blues, the Back Porch Rockers kick off Southport’s Summer Concert Series, 6-8 p.m., Thursday, June 2 at Franklin Square Park, 130 E. West St. ., in downtown Southport. Free. Bring a blanket or a chair.

The Tonez will perform at Leland's Live at the Park on June 2.

Leland Live at the Park

The Tonez will feature beach, dance and rock music at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 2 at Founders Park, 113 Town Hall Drive. Bring your own blanket or chair, food and drink. A food truck will be on site. Coolers are welcome. Smoking is strictly prohibited on all city property.

Artwork by Deborah Voso.  A reception will be held June 3 at the Southport Town Center Gallery's First Friday Walk.

First Friday Gallery Walk

Franklin Square Gallery in Southport features the work of two members Deborah Voso and Jennifer Qin, whose artwork exhibits an international flair. A reception will be held from 5-7 p.m. on Friday, June 3 at the First Friday Gallery Walk in Downtown Southport. Light refreshments will be served.

Featured 2D artist Voso brings his lifelong love of photography and his inspiration from nature and his travels around the world to his abstract paintings. Voso’s keen sense of balance between form and movement makes his work appealing to both traditional and contemporary art lovers. She uses fluid paints, resin and inks experimentally, allowing them to flow together in dynamic colors or subtle hues.

Jennifer Qin's pottery.  A reception will be held June 3 at the Southport Town Center Gallery's First Friday Walk.

A Shanghai-born 3D artist, Qin trained vigorously in drawing and writing Chinese calligraphy. However, her career choice was made by academic criteria and she was sent to study mechanical engineering, and she worked as an engineer for many years in China. After moving to the United States, Qin decided to pursue her interest in art, earning a Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design. After exploring different mediums, she found her passion for pottery. His work incorporates the artistic elements of balance, rhythm and harmony, with the precision of engineering.

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