Traditional calligraphy – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 21:59:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://logprotect.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-29T151759.208-150x150.png Traditional calligraphy – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ 32 32 See Arabic and Islamic calligraphy at Farmington Hills Town Hall https://logprotect.net/see-arabic-and-islamic-calligraphy-at-farmington-hills-town-hall/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 17:57:34 +0000 https://logprotect.net/see-arabic-and-islamic-calligraphy-at-farmington-hills-town-hall/ The works of artist Dr Nihad Dukhan, an American-Palestinian master of Arabic and Islamic calligraphy, will be on display until October 31 in the Revolving Exhibition Gallery at Farmington Hills Town Hall, 31555 W. 11 Mile Road. “The virtue of silence” by Nihad Dukhan (contribution) “You don’t have to know Arabic to appreciate Arabic and […]]]>

The works of artist Dr Nihad Dukhan, an American-Palestinian master of Arabic and Islamic calligraphy, will be on display until October 31 in the Revolving Exhibition Gallery at Farmington Hills Town Hall, 31555 W. 11 Mile Road.

“The virtue of silence” by Nihad Dukhan (contribution)

“You don’t have to know Arabic to appreciate Arabic and Islamic calligraphy. Its beauty is inspired by the intrinsic elegance of letters and the connecting traits between them, ”the Farmington Hills resident said in a press release.

Calligraphy, a writing tradition, dates back centuries in Arab culture, often practiced by religious scholars. Classical artwork follows strict rules, using wood-based ink and oil soot on traditional Ahar paper.

Dukhan became interested in this art form in sixth grade in his hometown of Gaza. After 17 years of study, he received his Ijazah (Masters in Calligraphy) from the famous Istanbul Grand Master Calligrapher Hasan Celebi in Thuluth and Naskh styles in 2009 and another diploma in Taliq style in 2013.

Nihad Dukhan - Solidarity
“Solidarity” by Nihad Dukhan (contribution)

In addition, Dukhan researches, experiments and refines a modern personal style executed with acrylics on white canvas using a brush. His minimalist style usually focuses on single words like “Basil,” “Solidarity” or “Crow” and strives to produce iconic and organic images of those words.

Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Detroit Mercy, Dukhan’s works are part of the permanent collections of the Arab-American National Museum, the Smithsonian National Postal Museum, the Istanbul Technical University and other notable collections throughout the world. As the master of this secular artistic tradition, he hopes to cross cultural barriers and transmit a message of unity and shared values.

The works of the public art program are on loan for two years and most are for sale. For more information, call the Cultural Arts Division, 248-699-6709.

The town hall is open Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Visitors should wear masks and respect social distancing.


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The magic and allure of Persian poetry https://logprotect.net/the-magic-and-allure-of-persian-poetry/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 08:10:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/the-magic-and-allure-of-persian-poetry/ There is something truly magnificent about poetry and literature in any language. You could say that poetry is language in its most exalted form, where every imaginable and unfathomable protentional of words is dragged and exposed. There is something magical about words and poetry has the capacity to exert mastery over that magic, not to […]]]>

There is something truly magnificent about poetry and literature in any language. You could say that poetry is language in its most exalted form, where every imaginable and unfathomable protentional of words is dragged and exposed. There is something magical about words and poetry has the capacity to exert mastery over that magic, not to tame it, no, but the exact opposite: to give it the space and the purpose to be. unleash and break free.

With Persian, I have always found this magical aspect more powerful and present. Maybe it’s the bias that speaks here (after all, you can never ignore the influence of the language you grew up with and made your first sentences with), or maybe, judging by the reaction. ardent of many personalities with Persian poetry like those of Molana Rumi or Khayyam, there is an element of objective truth in the feeling. In any case, Persian poetry, for me, has always been a great selling point in convincing foreigners to start learning the language, no matter how difficult it may seem at first due to the different systems of learning. writing. After all, few souls would fail to soar and vibrate with fear and longing upon hearing this line:

“یاد می آرم نمی مانم”

“Thoughts of you leave nothing of me.” – Saadi, 13th century Persian poet

And that’s our classic poetry. But it rings so close and so intimate in our hearts today as if there is no 900 year distance between the two. This is the magic of Saadi. The magic of poetry.

Persian poetry has a very special place in the hearts of Iranians. Many of our most common proverbs are in fact taken from classical poetry (“آواز دهل شنیدن از دور خوش است”, literally meaning “the sound of the drum sounds better from afar” and close to “blue are the hills which are far far away Is a very popular Persian proverb and is, in fact, a line from a poem by Khayyam.) Our love for poetry goes so far that many Iranians even try to get spiritual advice from it. The tradition of fal-e Hafez, which uses Hafez’s poems for divination, is well practiced in many homes, especially on special nights such as New Years or Yalda Night, a festival celebrated on the ‘night of the night. longest and darkest of the year. “

It is for this great love and attachment to poetry that September 18 was later named on the Iranian calendar as the National Persian Poetry Day, coinciding with the anniversary of the death of Iranian poet Mohammad Hossein Behjat Tabrizi ( 1906-1988), who is mainly known by his pen name as Shahriar.

Shahriar is best known for writing in both Azeri and Persian. In fact, he is considered to be one of the first Azerbaijanis in Iran to write an important collection of poetry in the Azeri language. His most famous work Heydar Babaya Salam (1954) is in fact popular among Azeri speaking people and has been translated into over 30 languages. Much of his poetry is linked to tragic themes and he drew heavily on Hafez and Ferdowsi.

The National Persian Poetry Day gave me a good opportunity to talk about Persian poetry. Here is a list of some of the most influential Persian poets and their contributions to keeping the Persian language alive and flourishing. You may also recognize some of them.

Ferdowsi (c.940-1020)

Abul-Qasem Ferdowsi Tusi is the author of Shahnameh (“Book of Kings”), which is one of the world’s longest epic poems created by a single poet, and the national epic of Greater Iran, containing many tales amazing stories about Persian mythical heroes such as Rostam. Ferdowsi is celebrated as the most influential figure in Persian literature and one of the greatest in the history of literature. Many believe that the reason why the modern Persian language today is more or less what it was over 1000 years ago is because of Shahnameh and its enduring linguistic influence.

April 14 is celebrated as Ferdowsi Day in Iran.

Tomb of Ferdowsi in Tus, Iran

Hafez (1315-1390)

Khwaja Shams-od-Din Mohammad Hafez-e Shirazi, known by his pen name Hafez, is considered by many Iranians to be a major figure who has greatly inspired much of Persian literature. His poetry book is found in almost every Persian-speaking home, and many of his verses had become popular proverbs. He is also credited with influencing Persian writing after the 14th century more than any other author. His poems are used for divination, in traditional Persian music, visual arts, and Persian calligraphy.

October 11 is celebrated as Hafez Day in Iran.

The magic and allure of Persian poetry
Rose and Nightingale on the binding of a divan by Hafez (1842)

Saadi (1210 – 1291 or 1292)

Abu-Mohammad Muslih al-Din bin Abdollah, better known by his pseudonym Saadi, was born in Shiraz and was a great Persian poet and prose writer of the medieval period. His mastery of the language is undisputed, and the quality of his writings has earned him the title of “Master of the Word” among Iranians. The most magical element of Saadi’s poetry is how simple it seems at first, but in fact, how the meaning and beauty of it crosses the lines. Anyone can read Saadi and learn something from it, while scholars will delve into the many layers of meaning and expose the true beauty of every word and line.

Bani Adam (meaning “Children of Adam”) is one of his most famous poems, inscribed on a large handmade rug installed in 2005 on the wall of a meeting room in the United Nations building in New York. York. The poem emphasizes the unity of humanity, regardless of social barriers and labels.

April 20 is celebrated as Saadi Day in Iran.

The magic and allure of Persian poetry
“Bani Adam” by Saadi on a Persian carpet decorating the wall of a meeting room at the UN

Molana ‘Rumi’ (1207 – 1273)

Jalal ad-Din Mohammad Rumi, better known in Iran as Molana / Molavai (“our master / my master”) and in the world as Rumi, was a 13th century Persian poet, Islamic scholar, a theologian and a Sufi mystic from Grand Khorasan in Greater Iran. Rumi’s influence transcends national borders and ethnic divisions: Iranians, Tajiks, Turks, Greeks, Pashtuns, other Muslims in Central Asia and Muslims in the Indian subcontinent have greatly appreciated his spiritual heritage over the past seven centuries. His poems have been widely translated into many languages ​​of the world. Translations of his works are very popular, especially in Turkey, Azerbaijan, the United States (in fact, the most popular poet there) and South Asia. He is described as “a poet of joy and love”.

September 29 is celebrated as Molana Day in Iran.

Khayyam (1048 – 1131)

Born in Nishabur in northeastern Iran, Omar Khayyam was a Persian mathematician, astronomer, philosopher and poet. As an astronomer, he designed the Jalali calendar, a solar calendar with a very precise 33-year intercalation cycle. There is a tradition of attributing poetry to Omar Khayyam, written in the form of quatrains. This poetry became widely known in the English-speaking world in a translation by Edward FitzGerald (Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, 1859), published in several hundred editions since. Khayyam’s poetry is best known for advocating living life in the present and enjoying small blessings to the fullest.

April 17 is celebrated as Khayyam Day in Iran.

By: Marjohn Sheikhi

This is a republished report


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[Well-Curated Weekend] Too much time, not much to do on Chuseok vacation? https://logprotect.net/well-curated-weekend-too-much-time-not-much-to-do-on-chuseok-vacation/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/well-curated-weekend-too-much-time-not-much-to-do-on-chuseok-vacation/ The traditional representation of Icheon “geobuknori” is reconstructed on the grounds of the National Folk Museum of Korea in Seoul. (National Folk Museum of Korea) For those who wish to immerse themselves in the holiday spirit of Chuseok, the National Folk Museum of Korea has various events, which started on Tuesday and will run until […]]]>

The traditional representation of Icheon “geobuknori” is reconstructed on the grounds of the National Folk Museum of Korea in Seoul. (National Folk Museum of Korea)

For those who wish to immerse themselves in the holiday spirit of Chuseok, the National Folk Museum of Korea has various events, which started on Tuesday and will run until September 26.

In the lobby of the National Folk Museum of Korea, there is a special photo area decorated on the theme of Chuseok.

Since some families cannot vacation together due to COVID-19, the museum has also placed “banbogi” postcards in the lobby so visitors can write to their families. Banbogi refers to the traditional Korean custom of meeting relatives out of town halfway between the two dwellings.

While enjoying the exhibits in the exhibition hall on Mondays and Wednesdays, don’t forget to take photos of the relics related to the harvest. The museum offers a special gift box to visitors that show harvest photos.

In the hallway near the third exhibition hall of the National Folk Museum of Korea, augmented reality content allows visitors to experience traditional Korean folk games.

There are also special gifts for children on Wednesday at the Children’s Museum of the National Folk Museum of Korea. After watching outdoor exhibits such as the Korean-style water wheel and the stone tower, children can take part in a mobile quiz and receive gifts.

For kids who enjoy watching YouTube, the museum’s YouTube channel has a fun video about traditional Korean holiday customs from Chuseok like Icheon’s “geobuknori”. The young people of Icheon collect sorghum stalks and use them to make a turtle costume. Two people wear the costume and together visit the houses in the village to get rid of bad luck.

Seoul Arts Center

During Chuseok’s vacation, Seoul Arts Center will be showing various artistic performances in its open-air Plaza Cinema.

Some of the centre’s best productions will be shown on a newly installed outdoor screen next to the Seoul Museum of Calligraphic Art.

Recordings of performances produced by the arts center will be screened along with independent films and Sac on Screen series. “Beloved Geumgangsan” (unofficial translation), by sopranos Sumi Jo and Aida Garifullina, and “The Story of an Old Couple” are just a few examples.

A digital image of “Saehando (Winter Scene)” by master Kim Jeong-hui (1786-1856) will also be shown. The 1844 painting, created in the fourth year of Kim’s exile on Jeju Island, is one of the most famous paintings from the Joseon period (1392-1910).

As Seoul is currently under Social Distancing Level 4, screenings at the Plaza Cinema will be Saturday through Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., except Monday.

Due to the Chuseok holiday, the Seoul Arts Center Music Hall will be closed Monday through Wednesday. The centre’s art exhibition will remain open every day except Monday.

“Harvest Season” by Baek Kyeong-won (Korean Heritage Preservation Society Yeol)

Handicraft exhibition in Yeol

The beauty of contemporary Korean crafts is on display until October 4 at the “Damda” exhibition at Yeol Bukchonga in central Seoul.

Eight promising artisans from different fields of craftsmanship, encompassing contemporary craftsmanship of glass, wood, metal and ceramics, participate in the exhibition.

Under the theme of “Damda”, which means “to contain,” Kang Seok-geun collected pieces of glass that contain different keepsakes and created glass crafts that contain a variety of keepsakes. Metal artist Kim Hyun-sung has created a metal chandelier reinterpreted in a unique and contemporary way.

Other participating artists include ceramicist Baek Kyeong-won, glassmaker Park Seon-min, metallurgist Sim Hyeon-seok and metallurgist Jo Seong-ho.

The Yeol Korean Heritage Preservation Society, the organizer of the exhibition, supports Korean artists through a scholarship program, the Yeol Artisan of the Year Award and the Yeol Young Craftman of the Year Award.

The “Damda” exhibition is open from 11 am to 5 pm Tuesday to Saturday. It will be closed for Chuseok on Sunday and Monday. Reservations are required to visit Yeol Bukchonga. For more information, visit the organization’s website.

By Culture Desk staff

(ssh@heraldcorp.com)

(silverstar@heraldcorp.com)

(yunapark@heraldcorp.com)

By Korea Herald (koreaherald@heraldcorp.com)


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Rank streamers for easier fly selection | Outbreak Magazine https://logprotect.net/rank-streamers-for-easier-fly-selection-outbreak-magazine/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 18:22:30 +0000 https://logprotect.net/rank-streamers-for-easier-fly-selection-outbreak-magazine/ Most of us benefit from having systems in place. This is true for almost any activity or pursuit, including fly fishing. When variables arise, whether expected or unexpected, setting up systems allows us to methodically troubleshoot our way to a solution. And, if our system is well designed, we hope this solution is the best. […]]]>

Most of us benefit from having systems in place. This is true for almost any activity or pursuit, including fly fishing. When variables arise, whether expected or unexpected, setting up systems allows us to methodically troubleshoot our way to a solution. And, if our system is well designed, we hope this solution is the best. Over the years I have developed systems that I use to solve a number of questions I encounter on the river: which rod to use on a given day, how to build my leader, how to dress and how to choose the model. fly tying, including streamers.

The characteristics of the fly are not lacking when choosing a banner: color, size, presence of flash or other characteristics designed to attract fish, whether the fly is articulated, etc. All of these considerations matter. But, in truth, these characteristics exist in streamers of all shapes and sizes. It’s rarely enough to choose a streamer just because it’s flashy, or articulate, or black.

Whether a trout hits a streamer out of aggression or simply out of hunger, it is more likely to hit a fly that is closer to its position in the water column (its “strike zone”) and that is. animated by the fisherman in an appropriate manner taking into account what we can determine about the behavior of the trout. In other words, where are the trout and what are they doing?

In my experience, the answer to this question is most often determined by a combination of factors: water temperature, water clarity, and what we can discern from fish activity.

Is the water extremely cold causing the fish to stay close to the bottom forcing you to fish deep and slowly? Are the fish in pre-spawn mode, staging themselves in shallows, leading to aggressive fish that will attack a fly moving quickly in shallow water? Is it spring, with hungry trout hunting along the banks? Is the water not colored, limiting the visibility of the fish, forcing you to slow down the action of the fly to give the fish more time to react?

As with all types of flies and all methods of fly fishing, when fishing for streamers, a fish is more likely to take a hit at your supply if it is a fish. well presented fly. Whether a streamer is well presented is most often determined by the depth of your fly in the water column and the type and speed of your retrieval.

Unlike dry fishing or nymphs, however, the success of your streamer presentation is greatly affected by which fly you choose. Some streamers are designed to sink faster than others, others to traverse water with speed and grace, and others to move erratically, to mimic injured prey and trigger a feeding reaction. The quality of your streamer’s presentation is determined, on the whole, by what it is designed for.

So how do you choose the right streamer? If you’re like me, you use a classification system that divides the world of streamers into three types of streamers based primarily on sink rate (and therefore how deep your fly is in the water column) and how which it is intended to be fished. (and the type and speed of your recovery).

Templates

Jigs are heavy head designs (often, but not always attached to jig style hooks) that are designed to drop quickly into the water column and be fished with slow retrieval. Models with dumbbell eyes (like a Clouser minnow) are examples of jig models. The heavy heads of these flies serve two purposes. First, the weight helps the fly to fall quickly into the trout strike zone. Second, the weight on the front end helps create an “up and down” motion during recovery. These patterns are often best fished with a floating or slow sinking line where the position of the fly in the water column (after sinking) is well below the level of the fly line. This separation in height between the line and the fly makes it possible to create the movement from top to bottom “jiggy”. This is also why regular floating lines work so well with jig style streamers.

These models are not designed to be fished quickly. Let the streamer run well below the fly line, make a short strip that pulls the fly up towards the fly line, followed by a pause to allow the streamer to fall. Then repeat the process to continue the presentation from top to bottom. Think of jigging as slowly grinding your pattern near the bottom of the stream.

In my experience, jigs work best when visibility is limited and trout activity is low (eg in extremely cold weather). My favorite cold-season streamer approach uses a float line, a 9 ‘, 2X long leader, and a heavy barbell-eyed streamer pattern.

Swimmers

I classify swimmers as models designed to move quickly through the water with rapid or continuous recovery. Often times, the best swimmers aren’t bulky or are constructed with materials that wick water away, allowing the fly to glide through the water with minimal resistance. What you don’t want is a pattern containing materials that absorb water like wool. While water-absorbent materials like wool will help make a fly sink, these flies also move slowly through the water (instead of sliding through it). If you’ve ever felt like pulling a wet sock off in water, there’s a good chance you’ve caught a fly constructed from water-absorbent materials.

Patterns like a traditional wool bugger (with or without a conical head) or the new Gamechanger-style patterns are good examples of swimmers. Swimmers are best fished with a high fast recovery in the water column. These are great choices when you want to fish close to shore, when trying to play takeout with predatory large trout hunting in shallows. While these models can be fished with a buoyant line, a slow or intermediate sinking often helps keep the model below the surface during a faster retrieval.

Hanging (or floating) banners

While I find myself fishing swimmer and jig style streamer models more often, hanging style streamers have their place, especially when trout activity is on the alert. These streamers are often created with deer hair, which adds buoyancy. Patterns like Drunken Disorderly by Tommy Lynch or Zoo Cougar by Kelly Galloup are two examples of hanging banners. Due to their high buoyancy, these models are best fished using a plunging tip or fully sinking line, as the weight of the line keeps these floating streamers anchored below the surface. Your recovery when fishing hanging streamers should be similar to jig style models – a break is required to allow the line to sink under the streamer before the recovery. The combination of the weighted line pulling down and the floating nature of the streamer pulling up creates an erratic up and down motion, mimicking an injured baitfish. While fishing for a sinking line and a floating streamer takes some getting used to, this combination does an amazing job of mimicking injured baitfish. As with swimmer-style streamers, hanging streamers work best when trout are actively hunting, especially during times of low light or when large predatory trout are hunting.

Wrap

By grouping your streamers into these three types, you can effectively choose the right fly for almost any condition. What type What streamer you want to fish should be the first question you ask yourself. Once you have answered this question, you may worry about the little things in life like color or if the fly has rubber feet, flash, cone or sculpin head etc. Add a little local experience and knowledge and you’ll be on your way to choosing the right weapon.


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The oldest animal sculptures in the world are found in Saudi Arabia! https://logprotect.net/the-oldest-animal-sculptures-in-the-world-are-found-in-saudi-arabia/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:21:29 +0000 https://logprotect.net/the-oldest-animal-sculptures-in-the-world-are-found-in-saudi-arabia/ In northern Saudi Arabia, and discovered for the first time in 2018, the research around the monumental sculptures of the Camel Site marks a new archaeological success! Dating back to prehistoric times, they are now officially recognized as the oldest large-scale animal reliefs in the world. Published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, the recent […]]]>

In northern Saudi Arabia, and discovered for the first time in 2018, the research around the monumental sculptures of the Camel Site marks a new archaeological success! Dating back to prehistoric times, they are now officially recognized as the oldest large-scale animal reliefs in the world.

Published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, the recent study has already done the trick! Not without reason, because if the first Franco-Saudi team who discovered the site believed that these life-size reliefs of a dozen dromedaries and donkeys dated from Antiquity, other studies, carried out by a trio of archaeologists from the CNRS, the Max Planck Institute and the King Saud 2 University, now trace the sculptures back to prehistoric times..

If this work is more than 7,000 years old, this means that these mysterious sculptures are older than internationally known sites such as the Pyramids of Giza, which are 4,500 years old. in Egypt and 5,000-year-old Stonehenge in England.

And to complete their research, the teams needed a wide range of skills and methods for direct and indirect dating, from the analysis of tool traces to rock erosion.

This is consistent with the measurements of the surface density of manganese and iron in the rock varnish. The site was probably used over a longer period of time and the landforms were reworked as erosion began to obscure details. By 1000 BC, erosion was sufficiently advanced to cause the first panels to fall, in a process that continues to this day.The study said.

Another great discovery for the archaeological world


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25 Unique Ways To Incorporate Greenery In Your Wedding Decor https://logprotect.net/25-unique-ways-to-incorporate-greenery-in-your-wedding-decor/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:50:04 +0000 https://logprotect.net/25-unique-ways-to-incorporate-greenery-in-your-wedding-decor/ Flowers are among the most important details when it comes to decorating your wedding, but going green is a tasteful and versatile alternative that will make a huge statement. Putting greenery in your wedding decor still allows you to bring the outdoors indoors, but instead of bold, dominant hues, the natural hue creates a classic, […]]]>

Flowers are among the most important details when it comes to decorating your wedding, but going green is a tasteful and versatile alternative that will make a huge statement. Putting greenery in your wedding decor still allows you to bring the outdoors indoors, but instead of bold, dominant hues, the natural hue creates a classic, crisp and clean look.

From eucalyptus and ferns to ivy and succulents, the choices are limitless. Playing with greenery gives you the opportunity to add dimension, texture, and shape to your nuptials. Whether you exchange vows in front of a vine-covered archway, dine at tables draped in garlands, or serve a cake topped with fresh leaves, garden-style decorations will enhance every part of your big day.

It doesn’t matter whether you are planning a glam, bohemian, tropical or modern wedding; lush greens are a gorgeous addition to any theme. There is also a lot of room for creativity when it comes to selecting how much greenery you want to include. Keep it simple with a few branches or go for a hanging greenery installation. You can also explore the seasonal options depending on the time of year you are getting married. Think fragrant pine for cold weather and eye-catching monstera leaves for balmy temperatures.

Not only is this verdant plant a stunning decoration, it is also an economical option. Greenery is usually sold in bundles, while flowers are sold by the stalk. Example: you get more for your money. And, since greenery spans your entire space, you’ll have a powerful impact for less money. If you’re looking for ways to turn all heads without breaking the bank, these new greenery ideas won’t disappoint.


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Roku Japanese Craft Gin offers the perfect drink for spring https://logprotect.net/roku-japanese-craft-gin-offers-the-perfect-drink-for-spring/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 07:01:30 +0000 https://logprotect.net/roku-japanese-craft-gin-offers-the-perfect-drink-for-spring/ If you’ve never tasted Japanese gin before, you’re in for a treat! Made by Japanese artisans based on centuries-old traditions, Roku means “six” in Japanese, and gin offers lovers a truly unique experience. Indeed, inside every bottle of Roku is a gin that has been crafted using only the finest ingredients harvested at their peak […]]]>

If you’ve never tasted Japanese gin before, you’re in for a treat! Made by Japanese artisans based on centuries-old traditions, Roku means “six” in Japanese, and gin offers lovers a truly unique experience. Indeed, inside every bottle of Roku is a gin that has been crafted using only the finest ingredients harvested at their peak in major growing areas of Japan. As a result, it takes a year to harvest all the ingredients that go into making this artisanal gin.

A celebration of Japanese craftsmanship

The bottle itself adds to the overall appeal of this gin. For starters, it features a hexagonal shape, with each of the six sides representing a Japanese botanical found in gin. The bottle is embossed in a style reminiscent of Japanese paintings and gives the bottle a refined and elegant look from all angles.

True to the theme of Japanese heritage, the bottle label features traditional Japanese calligraphy as well as a gold hexagonal hallmark to reaffirm the power of six plants. It’s all wrapped up on traditional washi paper, making it a head-turning bottle that deserves to be displayed prominently in your collection.

When it comes to the contents of the bottle, six unique Japanese herbs separate this gin from the rest. Sakura blossom, sakura leaf, sencha tea, gyokuro tea, sanshō pepper and yuzu zest represent the four seasons and make for a perfectly balanced blend.

This was all made possible by Shinjiro Torii. He opened the Torii Shoten Store in 1899, which would later become Suntory, the Japanese artisanal spirits distillers who make Roku gin. Shinjiro Torri’s dream was to create original Japanese spirits that the whole world could enjoy, uniquely inspired by Japan’s natural heritage and its people. Ultimately, Roku Gin is the culmination of over 100 years of dedication, with generations of artisans working together to create the perfect service.

But you don’t have to take our word for it, the gin reviews speak for themselves. It regularly receives good marks, with favorable opinions from professional sites and regular tasters. In South Africa, it has an impressive 4.8 out of 5 stars on Takealot, so you know you’ll be in good company when you buy a bottle.

Taste the seasons of Japan

When you add Roku gin to your favorite spring cocktail, you’ll immediately notice the complex, multi-layered yet harmonious flavor of the gin’s unique herbs – the cherry blossom and green tea notes are perfectly complemented by hints of spice. These flavors are associated with more traditional botanicals such as juniper, orange zest, lemon zest, cilantro and cinnamon.

And with spring here, there has never been a better time to savor the Roku Spring Highball Cocktail. Made with cranberry juice, hibiscus tonic and lemon zest as a garnish, this is the perfect service to awaken the senses and help you appreciate the beauty of the season.

Make your own Roku Spring Highball cocktail:


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The province of Qom offers specialized tours for administrators, researchers https://logprotect.net/the-province-of-qom-offers-specialized-tours-for-administrators-researchers/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 17:01:09 +0000 https://logprotect.net/the-province-of-qom-offers-specialized-tours-for-administrators-researchers/ TEHRAN – The province of Qom, which encompasses various religious, historical, cultural and natural sites, has organized a series of specialized tours for administrators, students and researchers. “Specific visits and workshops have been organized for administrators, students and experts in history and sociology,” said provincial deputy head of tourism, Ammar Kavousi, on Saturday. Today, the […]]]>

TEHRAN – The province of Qom, which encompasses various religious, historical, cultural and natural sites, has organized a series of specialized tours for administrators, students and researchers.

“Specific visits and workshops have been organized for administrators, students and experts in history and sociology,” said provincial deputy head of tourism, Ammar Kavousi, on Saturday.

Today, the first tour in the series was conducted to showcase some religious sites and mausoleums capped with conical domes, the official said.

Visits to historic houses and mansions as well as those to historic Ab-Anbars (cisterns) will be organized in the near future, he said.

Situated next to salt-covered deserts, golden dunes, running sands and jagged mountains, Qom is home to the Hazrat-e Masumeh (SA) shrine and major religious madrasas (schools).

Besides tourists and pilgrims who visit Qom to pay homage, it is also a prime destination for Shia scholars and students who come from all over the world to learn Islamic studies in its madrasas and browse prominent religious bookstores. Here is a selection of things to see and do in Qom:

The imposing shrine tends to go unnoticed, but it is one of the most amazing mosques in Iran. Named in honor of a sister of Imam Reza (AS), the eighth Shiite Imam whose shrine is located in Mashhad, the geometric shapes and floral designs of the shrine have a distinctly feminine touch, making you want to be linger a little longer outside to admire the tiles. The interior of this spacious sanctuary is immaculately decorated and has many notable on-site burials, ranging from royalty and political figures to clerics and scholars.

Bazaars are the beating heart of Iranian cities, and Qom’s is no different. Divided into two parts, the old section dates from the Safavid era (around four centuries ago) and looks more like a craft exhibition, while the new section was developed and enlarged in the 19th century.

Tucked away in a small garden are three 13th-century tower-shaped mausoleums built for members of the House of Safi, who ruled Qom in the 14th century. The two conical turquoise domes and a round dome are 12 sided on the outside but octagonal on the inside. The intricate masonry, along with Thuluth and Kufic calligraphy, are just a few of the similarities they have with the Dome of Soltaniyeh in Zanjan, from which they are said to have been inspired.

Another destination could be the Yazdanpanah house, which dates back to the end of the Qajar era and the beginning of the Pahlavi era. This 120-year-old mansion is divided into separate wings to accommodate changes in temperature throughout the year. Elaborately designed columns, windows and wind towers stand out from the simple mud brick building. It’s a spacious but comfortable place to enjoy a Persian meal, especially the traditional dizi stew or kebabs, followed by tea brewed over a charcoal fire.

The Jamkaran Mosque, which is a popular pilgrimage site for Shia Muslims, was originally built in the 1730s and expanded over the years. Thuluth’s brick iwans, multi-colored tiles, and calligraphy become especially scenic at night when spotlights illuminate the complex and give it a spiritual glow. The pilgrims who frequent this mosque write their vows on a piece of paper and deposit it in the well of the mosque for the 12th imam to answer.

One of the most visited natural sites in Qom is Hoz-e Soltan, an eye-catching salt lake located in the middle of the desert. Visitors could easily walk in the shallow parts and enjoy the shapes created by the salt, however, the center of the lake could be dangerous as it is muddy and could easily trap people.

AFM


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New openings in San Diego to be excited about this fall https://logprotect.net/new-openings-in-san-diego-to-be-excited-about-this-fall/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 21:52:41 +0000 https://logprotect.net/new-openings-in-san-diego-to-be-excited-about-this-fall/ From Riviera Maya-inspired cuisine to sand-infused Turkish coffee and more. Community | Photo by Jasmine Fitzwilliam / Let’s Frolic Together Community | Photo by Jasmine Fitzwilliam / Let’s Frolic Together It’s hard to believe but we have checked the schedule and yes summer is almost over. It doesn’t mean much to us here in America’s […]]]>

From Riviera Maya-inspired cuisine to sand-infused Turkish coffee and more.

Community | Photo by Jasmine Fitzwilliam / Let’s Frolic Together

Community | Photo by Jasmine Fitzwilliam / Let’s Frolic Together

It’s hard to believe but we have checked the schedule and yes summer is almost over. It doesn’t mean much to us here in America’s most beautiful city – our virtually perfect weather allows us to always go out and enjoy new things to see, eat, drink and do. As you prepare for some (light) sweater weather, mark these establishments that should be arriving on our shores before the end of the year. From Riviera Maya-inspired Mexican cuisine to Cajun soul food, a new boutique hotel and more, here are nine fall openings we can’t be silent about:

salmon tostada
Photo courtesy of Camino Riviera

Little Italy
Opening date : End of August 2021
Born from the ashes of beloved El Camino in Little Italy, SDCM, the people who brought us Kettner Exchange and The Waverly, Camino Riviera celebrates the spirit of the Yucatán Coast. Owner Matt Spencer and owner of El Camino partnered on the design, delivering a sensory experience that evokes the beauty of Tulum, while paying homage to the original location. Executive Chef Brian Redzikowski’s menu explores Riviera Maya favorites like grilled Alaskan king crab tacos, oak grilled shrimp and Spanish octopus. Beverage directors Leigh Lecap and Eric Johnson have created a similarly inspired cocktail menu, which Lecap says “is paired with the flavors of Yucatán … cochinita pibil, papadzules and various moles like pipián and the mole blanco served as guides of flavors and inspiration “.
How to book: Sign up to receive news and updates via email on their website.

Saber springs
Opening date : August 28, 2021
Join Empress Family of Restaurants (Death by Tequila, Wokou Ramen & Yakitori, California Native) for the grand opening celebration of their latest concept, Crafted Culture. The all-day dining occupies an indoor-outdoor amenity space in Kilroy Saber Springs, catering to campus office tenants as well as the North County community. Executive Chef Chris Carriker, whose 20-year culinary career includes a championship broadcast on Food Network’s Chopped and a stint at International Smoke from Executive Chef Michael Mina, kept the new menu a secret, but the grand opening celebration, from 4 p.m. to closing on August 28, includes live music performances, local craft beer and cocktails, appetizers on the platter, and Hawaiian roast pork. Everything is free, with no RSVP required!
How to book: Reservation details will be on their website.

Bohemian alchemist interior
Photo courtesy of Bohemian Alchemist

Del mar
Opening date : Beginning of September 2021
Sarah Jaeger’s new cafe, Bohemian Alchemist, is not your typical cafe. Boasting the first and only sand brewing system approved by the San Diego Health Department, the basis of their drinks is Turkish coffee, a milder, silkier equivalent of traditional espresso. If you are unfamiliar with sand brewing, a cezve (Turkish coffee maker) is placed on very hot sand, which heats your barely boiling coffee, tea or hot chocolate, producing a rich taste and mouthfeel pleasantly thick. French press, pour, and cold brew options are also available, along with coffee and tea blends, herbal drinks, and seasonal iced teas. The space itself is inspiring – a low Turkish seating area with a colorful silky tent roof, handmade Art Nouveau tables, antique and eclectic pieces reused to serve as counters and shelves are inviting and serene. And since coffee and tea are just asking for a sweet treat, you’ll want one of their cream scones, muffins, shortbread cookies, fruit pies, caramel apple pies and more.
How to book: Places are allocated on a first come first basis. Sign up to receive news and updates via email online.

mini donuts
Photo courtesy of The Mini Donut Compant

Liberty Station
Opening date : September 2021
Why eat a donut when you can eat two or three without feeling guilty? The Mini Donut Company, with its two-bite treasures, lets you do just that. They’ll be opening their first brick-and-mortar store at Liberty Public Market, with signature sweet, iced, and sprinkled offerings, as well as special editions that add Captain Crunch, Oreo, Fruity Pebbles, Reese’s Pieces, and more, available for the pre-order pickup.
How to book: Order online for pickup. Places will be allocated on a first come basis.

Photo by Jasmine Fitzwilliam / Let’s Frolic Together

Ocean side
Opening date : October 1, 2021
Communal, a creatively-minded cafe and boutique known for its locations in San Diego’s North and South Parks is coming to Oceanside, with a full menu of artisanal coffees and drinks, seasonal fare, artistically designed spaces. creative, fresh flowers and selected products. In a shared space anchoring the Tremont collective, there is a private patio, as well as an event space available for rent for private parties. Another event space will host classes organized by Communal in calligraphy, floral composition, macrame and other clever options.
How to book: Places will be allocated on a first come basis. Check their website or Instagram for updates.

Cormorant exterior
Photo courtesy of Cormorant Boutique Hotel

La Jolla
Opening date : Early fall 2021
Formerly La Jolla Inn, the Cormorant Boutique Hotel has undergone a comprehensive three-year renovation that brings a mid-century modern aesthetic to the heart of La Jolla. Twenty-six nautical-inspired rooms, each with a balcony and breathtaking views of the Pacific Ocean, a new rooftop bar, Birdseye, offering craft cocktails and small plates, and Prospect Market, a high-end market range to go, have everything you need from out of town guests or a luxury stay for yourself.
How to book: Sign up to receive news and updates via email online.

Downtown
Opening date : End of August 2021
This quick and relaxed Asian fusion cafe is one of two concepts opening at Seaport Village this fall. This locally owned place is centered around bowls of barbecue-topped rice and delicious bao rolls, complemented by a program of craft Asian beers and boba teas.
How to book: Places will be allocated on a first come basis. Follow them on Instagram for news and updates.

Downtown
Opening date : September 2021
The other concept opening its doors at Seaport Village that makes our mouths water with impatience is the famous Long Beach Louisiana Charlie’s restaurant. They bring soul food from New Orleans to San Diego with iconic Cajun and Creole dishes – think jambalaya, okra, and po boy sandwiches, as well as fresh seafood like oysters, crab legs and shrimp.
How to book: Places will be allocated on a first come basis. Join their mailing list for updates and news, or check out the Seaport Village website.

Pacific Capture
Pacific Capture

University town
Opening date : September 27, 2021
Northern California’s beloved Pacific Catch is slated to open in the Westfield UTC Mall, offering two destination patios, an outdoor cocktail bar, intimate booths, and communal tables for big parties. Pacific Catch offers sustainably-caught, wild-caught seafood, and is a member of the Seafood Watch and James Beard Smart Catch programs. The menu includes poke, sushi, ceviche, grilled fish, burgers and tacos, as well as numerous libations like tiki drinks, various margaritas, “twisted classics”, beer, wine, kombucha. hard and sake.
How to book: Reservations can be made online once the restaurant is close to opening.

Want more thrills? Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, TikTok and Snapchat.

Mary Beth Abate is a freelance writer based in San Diego, Chicago and Los Angeles. His hobbies include yoga, pickling and fermenting, reading cookbooks, and consuming fabulous gin. Follow her experiences @MaryBeth_Abate.



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Hung Liu, Artist Who Mixed East and West, Dies at 73 https://logprotect.net/hung-liu-artist-who-mixed-east-and-west-dies-at-73/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 17:40:50 +0000 https://logprotect.net/hung-liu-artist-who-mixed-east-and-west-dies-at-73/ Hung Liu, a Chinese-American artist whose work fused past and present, East and West, earning praise in her adopted country and censorship in her homeland, has died August 7 at his home in Oakland, California. She was 73 years old. . The cause was pancreatic cancer, the Nancy Hoffman Gallery, which represents Ms. Liu in […]]]>

Hung Liu, a Chinese-American artist whose work fused past and present, East and West, earning praise in her adopted country and censorship in her homeland, has died August 7 at his home in Oakland, California. She was 73 years old. .

The cause was pancreatic cancer, the Nancy Hoffman Gallery, which represents Ms. Liu in New York City, said in a statement.

His death came less than three weeks before the scheduled opening of a career investigation, “Hung Liu: Portraits of Promised Lands,” at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington. She was the first Asian American woman to have a solo exhibition there.

“A five thousand year old culture on my back; the world of the end of the twentieth century in my face ”, is how Ms. Liu described her arrival in the United States from China in 1984, when she was 36 years old. and already an accomplished painter. Her goal in America, she once said, was “to invent a way to allow me to practice as a Chinese artist outside of a Chinese culture.”

As she quickly learned, one of the issues with being a Chinese artist outside of China was the need to manage and counter cultural expectations. Its very name automatically evoked, for many Western viewers, associations with traditional but stereotypical “Eastern” art forms such as calligraphy and brush-and-ink painting. Moreover, at that time, before the arrival of the wave of globalist art in the 1990s, the art world in Europe and the United States had little awareness of the very existence of Chinese art. contemporary.

His work incorporated photographic images that combined the political and the personal. Many of these images represented forgotten figures in history: workers, immigrants, prisoners, prostitutes. In some cases, she has represented them surrounded by flowers. There were also portraits of her Chinese family, including that of her father, taken from a snapshot that she herself had taken during her visit to a labor camp.

His 1988 painting “Resident Alien”, which has become the most widely reproduced, is a wall representation of his Green Card. It includes a realistically rendered self portrait, but the identifying name on the card has been changed to “Cookie, Fortune” and the year of birth from 1948 to 1984, the year she immigrated.

Hung Liu was born on February 17, 1948 in Changchun, northeast China, during the revolutionary era. When she was a child, her father, a teacher, was jailed for her involvement in anti-Communist politics. During the Cultural Revolution, she herself was sent by the government to the countryside to work on farms for “re-education”. There, she secretly photographed and sketched the daily life of the village.

She also traveled to China, visiting historic sites and, using a pocket paint box, making copies, among other things, of wall paintings carved and painted by Buddhist monks from the 5th to the 14th centuries in the Dunhuang Caves, in the far west of Gansu. Province.

In the 1970s, she studied at Beijing Teachers College and the Central Academy of Fine Arts. In 1981, she obtained a graduate degree from the Central Academy of Fine Arts, where she specialized and taught mural painting.

Agitated by the style and subjects of officially sanctioned socialist realism, she repeatedly asked the Chinese government for a passport to travel to the United States. When permission finally arrived in 1984, she flew to California and enrolled in the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of California at San Diego.

One of his teachers there was conceptual artist Allan Kaprow, who had a long knowledge of Asian art and viewed both art and culture as ductile categories. His presence ensured a welcoming environment for his goals.

After obtaining a residency at the Capp Street Project, an art space and an artist residency in San Francisco, in 1988, Ms. Liu settled permanently in the Bay Area. In 1990, she began a long teaching career at Mills College in Oakland. She retired in 2014.

Her first exhibition in the United States, in 1985, consisted of drawings she brought with her from Dunhuang murals, but the work she started producing in California was quite different.

Its political content became more emphatic following the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989. In a multimedia installation from that year, “Trauma,” the cut-out silhouette of a woman in traditional Chinese dresses with her feet tied, floats on the wall above the body of a fallen student. The black silhouette of Mao Zedong’s face hangs on the wall between them. The ground below is spattered with blood-red paint.

In 1994, for the MH de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco, Ms. Liu made an installation commemorating Chinese immigrants who died during the construction of the western section of the transcontinental railroad. In the 2000s, she began to work extensively with non-Chinese sources, basing a series of paintings on documentary images of the Great Depression by American photographer Dorothea Lange. Dust Bowl’s rural destitution scenes captured by Lange reminded her of those she had witnessed and recorded in drawings, as she lived among the poor in rural China.

Most of Ms. Liu’s paintings were done in a brush version of the realistic style in which she was trained. But, skeptical of any claim to the veracity of the portrayal of history, she regularly covered the surface of her paintings with linseed oil washes, which sent streams of transparent liquid running down the canvas. This formal effect has given rise to various interpretations: fuzzy memory, tears, reality as an illusion.

Ms. Liu has presented several institutional exhibitions in the United States, including the 2013 retrospective “Summoning the Ghosts: The Art of Hung Liu”, organized by the Oakland Museum of California and which has traveled nationwide. The exhibition “Hung Liu: Golden Gate” is currently on display at the De Young Museum. The National Portrait Gallery exhibition, which runs until May 30, 2022, is his first major exhibition on the East Coast.

In 2008, as China relaxed culturally, Ms. Liu was treated to a retrospective at the Xin Beijing Gallery. But a 2019 investigation slated for the UCCA Contemporary Art Center in Beijing was abruptly canceled by the Chinese government, even after it granted its request to remove pieces which, in light of pro-demonstrations. -democracy in Hong Kong, were considered inflammatory.

Ms. Liu is survived by her husband, critic and curator Jeff Kelley; one son, Lingchen Kelley; and a grandson.

In addition to her paintings, Ms. Liu has made a few permanent public works, including “Going Away, Coming Home,” a 160-foot-long mural installed at Oakland International Airport. It is made entirely of glass windows painted with images derived from a 12th-century Chinese paint roller: dozens of ethereal flying white cranes, traditional Chinese symbols of good fortune.

The image is one of the most poetic created by an artist who wrote, in “Ghosts / Seventy Portraits”, a collection of her work in 2020: “When I moved to the West, there was exactly one half. life, I carried my ghosts with me.The ghosts that I carry are a burden, but also a blessing.


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