Modern calligraphy – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 21:01:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://logprotect.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-29T151759.208-150x150.png Modern calligraphy – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ 32 32 Timeless Custom of Wielding Writers’ Swords – The New Indian Express https://logprotect.net/timeless-custom-of-wielding-writers-swords-the-new-indian-express/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 03:49:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/timeless-custom-of-wielding-writers-swords-the-new-indian-express/ Express news service HYDERABAD: Modern neuroscience suggests that when we write by hand, a unique neural activity in our brain is activated, which is akin to meditation. Some of the famous writers such as Stephen King, Franz Kafka, F Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, who all had access to a typewriter or even a computer, […]]]>

Express news service

HYDERABAD: Modern neuroscience suggests that when we write by hand, a unique neural activity in our brain is activated, which is akin to meditation. Some of the famous writers such as Stephen King, Franz Kafka, F Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, who all had access to a typewriter or even a computer, chose to put a pen on paper while creating much of it. their work. In a world of computers, texts and letters, the Deccan Pen Store in Ameerpet and Abids, which was established in 1928, continues to sell handcrafted fountain and ink pens.

Mir Najaf Ali Khan, the grandson of VII Nizam of Hyderabad Mir Osman Ali Khan, is an avid fountain pen user. Both his grandfather and father bought pens from Deccan Pen Store, which imported pens from the UK. “The pleasure of writing with an ink pen is immeasurable. The immersive contentment of sitting on a desk with an inkwell, stylus, and ink-stained fabric and papers is lost today. Writing with these pens takes a lot of patience, persistence and concentration, which modern people have lost.

The Deccan Pen Store offers timeless, ornate and handcrafted ink pens, adaptable to every hand. Whether scribbling, doodling, writing, writing, calligraphy, or drawing, you can get them all. “We have custom pens for writers who hold their pens at a certain angle, those who need a specific type of grip and a particular speed,” says Salman Siddiqui, one of the owners of the Deccan. Pens Store.

The company began making craft pens in the 1960s. Prior to that, Salman’s grandfather, company founder Sabi Siddiqui, imported craft pens from the company’s handmade pens. Conway Stewart in the UK. “These pens were a symbol of luxury among the nobles of Hyderabad, who adored them,” adds the co-owner of the pen store Hassan Siddiqui.

“Until the 1960s, ink pens were widespread throughout the city. Subsequently, ink pens appeared on the market, followed by ballpoint pens, but Hyderabdis’ love of fountain pens never ended. There were a lot of people, like a few Urdu writers, who preferred only fountain pens, ”says Salman.

Deccan Pen Store began making its branded, handcrafted ink pens in the early 1970s. Even though the market had cheaper and more efficient pens, there were still lovers of the good old fountain pens. “Although the sale of fountain pens has declined, many hobbyists, professional writers, doctors, lawyers, politicians, bureaucrats and celebrities still use personalized Deccan ink pens,” Salman adds.

According to Najaf Ali Khan, Mir Osman Ali Khan has repeatedly donated pens from the Deccan Pen Store to his office store in the city. The Deccan pen store now offers custom engraved steel nibs, gold nibs for fountain pens, in addition to a personalized grip, adapted to the style of the writer.


Source link

]]>
IN FOCUS: How young Singaporeans turn their passions into profits with side activities https://logprotect.net/in-focus-how-young-singaporeans-turn-their-passions-into-profits-with-side-activities/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:00:49 +0000 https://logprotect.net/in-focus-how-young-singaporeans-turn-their-passions-into-profits-with-side-activities/ Another potential problem for people wishing to pursue a secondary activity is that their employer has contractual clauses preventing them from doing so. However, while some employment contracts regulate an employee’s ability to take a second job, Dr Theseira states that this is an “unreasonable restriction” on a worker’s liberty, unless such employment does not […]]]>

Another potential problem for people wishing to pursue a secondary activity is that their employer has contractual clauses preventing them from doing so.

However, while some employment contracts regulate an employee’s ability to take a second job, Dr Theseira states that this is an “unreasonable restriction” on a worker’s liberty, unless such employment does not create a conflict of interest.

If allowing a worker to pursue a secondary activity increases the chances that he will keep his main job because his income or personal aspirations are satisfied through his side activities, it is also an advantage for his main employer because it reduces the turnover rate, he added. .

Economic progress goes beyond GDP or the number of people at work, and is also measured by people’s ability to achieve well-being and achieve their aspirations, Dr Theseira said.

“Seen in this light, if people derive both income and pleasure from their side jobs, hobbies or interests, it is good for their well-being and self-fulfillment as well as for their life. economy, ”he added.

However, some companies do not openly allow secondary activities, as they could appear to be moonlighting, said Ms. Lee of Robert Walters.

That’s why most employees with side work or freelance work tend to do it quietly, she added.

“Regardless of the industry, employers may be willing to allow their employees to self-employment or other jobs as long as their performance in their salaried role is not affected. ”

It also depends on the specific department and the culture of the company, said IHRP’s Mr. Tan.

“Of course, at the human resources and corporate level, you have certain metrics on dos and don’ts. But if you have a very understanding boss who is very results oriented or results oriented, then you can definitely get their blessing, ”he added.

Mr. Haiqal’s boss and colleagues are aware of his sideways restlessness, he noted.

“My company is open in the sense that … (It’s good) As long as the secondary activity does not coincide or does not have a direct conflict of interest with the work, or as long as it affects the level performance and productivity of the work I do, ”he explained.

Mr. Tan, who is the father of two young sons, noted that it is not easy to manage his daily work, his side work and time spent with the family. To manage his time, he often writes his articles late before bed or early before going to work.

“I have to plan my family affairs – trips, outings around it. So it’s really difficult, ”he admitted.

But it varies from individual to individual.

“Somehow I am fortunate enough to be able to work in a company in a role where most of my work takes place on the working hours themselves and anything that can be done can be done strictly at my own time and for my own purpose, ”Haiqal noted.

“There’s not much that I can do that I really have to go out of my way to make sure I make time for things. “

BENEFITS AND CONCERNS OF EMPLOYERS

Employers may also be concerned that their workers are adopting side activities if their main full-time jobs are time sensitive. These companies might not be able to provide the same flexibility needed for self-employment opportunities, said IHRP’s Mr Tan.

“And then the other reason is that they can have their minds that you might be able to work in something that might go through what you’re doing. You may be sharing information about the competition, so that may be another concern, ”he added.

Many employers look at work from an “entry point of view,” and they judge employees based on the number of hours they devote to the job, Tan said.

“If I pay you 40 hours a week, then I would expect 40 hours … But what are those 40 hours?” Five hours on Facebook, six hours in the pantry, in fact that doesn’t mean anything, ”he added.

“I think the mindset needs to change, and also to really let employers know that this is actually employee engagement,” he said, urging employers to consider enabling staff to pursue their interests as a benefit to employees, similar to the implementation of flexible working arrangements.

“Right now it’s so hard to hire people, with a fertility rate of 1.1 you are fighting like crazy with the big business budget, you need all that flexibility. “

Dr Theseira agreed that companies should manage employment based on performance, rather than on the basis of input metrics, such as how many hours an employee spends at work or whether they have only one job.

“It should be noted that the modern employment contract only allows a company to monitor an employee’s work for a specified set of regular working hours,” he added.


Source link

]]>
Turkey is finally off the red list – here are the best vacations on offer https://logprotect.net/turkey-is-finally-off-the-red-list-here-are-the-best-vacations-on-offer/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 16:05:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/turkey-is-finally-off-the-red-list-here-are-the-best-vacations-on-offer/ No other Mediterranean destination offers the visitor as much variety as Turkey. Head east from the shores of the Aegean Sea, rich in olives and vineyards, through the rolling steppes of Anatolia and you will meet the spectacularly mountainous borders of Georgia, Armenia and Iran . To the north, through the towering Taurus Mountains from […]]]>

No other Mediterranean destination offers the visitor as much variety as Turkey. Head east from the shores of the Aegean Sea, rich in olives and vineyards, through the rolling steppes of Anatolia and you will meet the spectacularly mountainous borders of Georgia, Armenia and Iran . To the north, through the towering Taurus Mountains from sunny Mediterranean resorts, you will come to the temperate mountains, hazelnut trees and Black Sea tea. Cross the mighty Euphrates and Tigris Rivers of Turkey’s arid but fascinating southeast, and you can climb Biblical Mount Ararat – 17,000 feet high and glacier-covered – in a hot air balloon over the fairytale volcanic landscape of the Cappadocia or relax on a crisscrossed beach with palm-tagged nesting turtles.

Such a remarkably diverse topography, climate, flora and fauna mean that Turkey offers all kinds of holiday experiences you could want – with warm temperatures through October. To unwind, relax by the beach or by the pool at an all-inclusive hotel near Antalya in the Mediterranean, or cruise the beautiful turquoise coast aboard a traditional wooden sailboat (schooner). Do you feel more active? The Turquoise Coast and its hinterland are perfect for kayaking, scuba diving, canyoning, mountain biking and hiking on the marked trails of Carian and Lycian. Accommodation ranges from simple family pensions in places like Dalyan, Kaş and Patara to luxury hotels in posh Bodrum and golfers’ favorite, Belek – and everything in between, so there’s something to suit every budget.

Given that geographically Turkey spans two continents – Europe and Asia – and culturally sits between predominantly Christian Europe and the predominantly Muslim Middle East, it is no surprise that it has a rich and dynamic heritage. Whether it’s soaking up the atmosphere of legendary Troy, sweating gently in a 500-year-old Ottoman Turkish bath, learning about contemporary art at Istanbul Modern, or following the St Paul’s footsteps in ancient Perge, there is always something to do that intrigues the curious visitor. That’s not to mention the country’s rich culinary tradition – a happy union of the best flavors from East and West.

Finally, Turkey has moved on to the new green list, making it the perfect choice for the fall break. Turkey’s famous hospitality has not been tarnished by the hardships of Covid-19, and its well-regulated tourism industry has done everything possible throughout the pandemic to keep visitors safe, including with its certification program security from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism for hotels, restaurants and transport. And while soaring inflation and the need to be ultra-competitive in the face of the pandemic-induced decline in tourist numbers are far from ideal in the long run for locals or the Turkish tourism industry, they mean the holidays here are extremely good. value for money compared to most European destinations. With that in mind, here are some of the best vacations in the country, for all types of vacationers.

The attraction of the past

Turkey has a rich and deep history that few other countries can match. Western visitors are most familiar with the myriad of classical Greek and Roman sites that dot its beautiful Aegean coast. The ruins of Troy, brought to life in Homer’s Iliad, still stand at the mouth of the Dardanelles. The huge theater in Ephesus, where St. Paul proselytized and unwittingly caused a riot among his goldsmiths, is surprisingly well preserved. The spectacular ruins of Pergamon, once famous for its extensive library, are staggered in spectacular steps along a striking rocky outcrop. Exploring these sites, or the countless other ancient sites that dot Turkey’s Aegean and Mediterranean coasts, often with nothing more than a few goats or turtles for company, is one of life’s great joys.

Are you feeling more adventurous? Immerse yourself in the heart of Anatolia to explore the rock-hewn Byzantine churches located in the incredible geological wonderland of Cappadocia. The most recently discovered gem in Turkey’s archaeological crown, however, is Unesco’s World Heritage Site Göbekli Tepe, an astonishing series of circular stone structures dating back to 10,000 BC. . The Byzantine churches and Ottoman mosques in one of the most beautiful and fascinating cities in the world, Istanbul, are easier to visit. No matter where you go in this remarkable country, it’s impossible to resist the lure of its past.


Source link

]]>
Historic house restored with works of art https://logprotect.net/historic-house-restored-with-works-of-art/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 03:27:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/historic-house-restored-with-works-of-art/ The “Centennial Sea” art exhibition which runs until Sunday is in full swing in a historic century-old house on Sichuan Road M. Almost 100 paintings, installations and sculptures are on display from the second to the fourth floor in the neoclassical house built in 1921, the former headquarters of Brunner, Mond & Co, a British […]]]>

The “Centennial Sea” art exhibition which runs until Sunday is in full swing in a historic century-old house on Sichuan Road M.

Almost 100 paintings, installations and sculptures are on display from the second to the fourth floor in the neoclassical house built in 1921, the former headquarters of Brunner, Mond & Co, a British chemical company.

The paintings decorate, interpret and blend in the house, and at the same time revive and refresh it again after 100 years. These silent works of art talk about the relationship between the eternity of time and the malleability of space with different types of media.

The installation “The Midas Touch” by artist Shen Ye is a philosophical reflection inspired by Chinese mythology. A crow stands on a wooden box painted with gold leaf, looking for the “golden finger” of the immortal Lu Dongbin, who could turn anything into gold just by pointing at it. . A few steps away, rocks coated with golden lacquer are scattered.

The image of a crow is quite empowering, as the scavenger in Chinese culture is an ominous emblem, as well as a symbol of imperial authority that often involves the rise and fall of a dynasty. The metaphor of the work becomes complicated, which could allude to the artist’s irony towards the fetishism of the commodity.

Tan Weiyun / SHINE

Shen Ye’s installation “The Midas Touch”

Xue Song is known for his innovative combination of modern techniques and traditional elements, such as calligraphy and folk art.

The artist stands out for his collage style, characterized by the engraving of ready-made images and his rearrangement of the burnt fragments on the canvas.

Xue’s painting “Families Against the Bottom of White Clouds” features bright spots of color and thick lines, providing a striking visual effect.

Exhibition information

Dates: until September 19, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Banknotes: 100 yuan

Location: BAIwork

Address: 133 Sichuan Road M.


Source link

]]>
Meeras Mahal Museum: Continues the Legacy of Atiqa Bano https://logprotect.net/meeras-mahal-museum-continues-the-legacy-of-atiqa-bano/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 18:19:33 +0000 https://logprotect.net/meeras-mahal-museum-continues-the-legacy-of-atiqa-bano/ Meeras Mahal is the only private museum in Kashmir located in the city of Sopore, in the north of Kashmir. It was created by the famous pedagogue Atiqa Bano, who died at the age of 77 on October 4, 2017. The museum houses a collection of ancient ornaments, papier-mâché objects, traditional dresses and traditional Kashmiri […]]]>

Meeras Mahal is the only private museum in Kashmir located in the city of Sopore, in the north of Kashmir. It was created by the famous pedagogue Atiqa Bano, who died at the age of 77 on October 4, 2017.

The museum houses a collection of ancient ornaments, papier-mâché objects, traditional dresses and traditional Kashmiri utensils. It contains manuscripts of the Holy Quran and other masterpieces of Islamic calligraphy.

The two-story museum was established by the late Atiqa Bano, who was popularly known as Behan-Ji throughout Kashmir. She was born into an educated family in the 1940s and received her BA from Women’s College in Srinagar, followed by an MA in Urdu and Economics.

Later, she also graduated from M.ED in Rajasthan. In 1958, she joined the School Education Department and retired in 1997 as Director of Libraries and Research, Jammu and Kashmir.

After serving in the education department, Bano had in mind that she wanted to start her own museum in 2002 in the city of Sopore illustrating the culture and diversity of Jammu, Kashmir and Ladakh.

She has spent her life for her dream, including 16 full years preserving the culture. Currently, his nephew is the guardian of the museum.

Museum keeper Muzamil Bashir Masoodi told Rising Kashmir that the museum portrays 90 percent of Kashmiri culture and has been one of the emerging tourist spots across North Kashmir.

“It was his idea to create a unique museum that will reflect the collection of the three regions of the former state of Jammu and Kashmir,” he said.

Masoodi said that before 2019 people came here to visit the place and explore the different sections of the museum. Now, after Covid-19, some schools and colleges have started to visit the place, he said.

Masoodi said his paternal aunt had a unique passion for keeping ancient Kashmir alive by preserving art and culture. For years, she has gone door-to-door looking for valuable additions to her “heritage palace,” he said.

It also has a good collection of woven Kangris, dozens of wooden and jute shoes, traditional Kashmiri costumes, Ladakhi caps, shawls and dresses, scarves, hats, jewelry, watches, clocks. , headgear, necklaces, bracelets, rings, earrings, stone utensils, tools, radios, a milk jug and other items, he said .

“We have also preserved earthenware, grass work, dresses, wooden objects, old paintings, stone objects and even fossils. A few copies of an old weekly newspaper ‘Diler’ are also kept here, ”Masoodi said.

“There are house tiles that were used in Kashmir around 2,500 years ago and traditional Kashmir used before a century ago. She worked day and night for the staging of this museum.

About the idea of ​​establishing a museum in Sopore, he said, it initially started with traditional Kangri clay pots, 32 pounds from his grandfather Ghulam Mohammad Hanfi, who was a famous author. .

“Apart from these books, there are thousands of books, including manuscripts and rare books. The museum’s collections are stored in 7-8 rooms, including a separate traditional Kashmiri house (Dahati Ghar).

He said that in recent years the government had approached the family to move the Srinagar-owned museum but the family was not ready for this decision.

“Even they promised me a job in the government in exchange for moving the museum, but I refused. I want to pass on his mission (Atiqa Bano) and keep his lost charm,” Masoodi said.

He said they also asked officials from the archeology department to visit the museum, but things remained unchanged on the ground. “Now we manage everything. Once the government provided us with preservative acid, but after that they never helped us in any way, ”he said.

“The work can only last 20 to 25 years, but the legacy of a museum lasts for centuries. It gives us unique peace of mind. We want to work on this project and explore more possibilities in the future, said Masoodi.

Regarding the current plans, Masoodi said they are also continuing to collect the rare items across the valley. “Whatever historical artifact we find in any part of the valley, we add it to the collection,” he said, adding that they also had a collection from Rajasthan, ”he said. he declared.

He said there was a lack of space in the museum and that there were five to six rooms full of a collection of cultural objects. “We plan to expand it in the future,” he said.

He said they have a traditional oil spoon (Till Krund) and a lightning instrument (Tchoong). 18th century Kashmiri coins (sansu approx.6.2 g). Traditional Kashmiri Basket, Pann Dabb, Samawar, Sorma Stone, Wooden Kitchen Vessels. Traditional Kashmiri cuisine, cooking in an earthenware fireplace (Dambur).

Bano suffered from cancer and she passed away in 2017. “A deadly cancer could not deter her struggle, love and affection for her work and her community. She continued to visit her college and other offices until her last breath, ”Masoodi said.

About his paternal aunt, he said that she also established the Kashmir Women’s College (B.ED College) in 2001 and also contributes to society by setting up the Islamic Darasgah in the villages around Sopore. , where she helped children participate in religious activities and modern education.

“She had set up 15 Darasgahs for the children and she was paying the preacher (Molvi Sahibb) and housing. After his death, these schools are now closed, ”he said.

Masoodi said she was the inspiration for young women in northern Kashmir and was also vice president of Adbee Markaz Kamraz Jammu and Kashmir, which is the oldest and largest cultural and literary organization of J&K focused on the promotion and preservation of Kashmiri culture, literature and culture. art.

“Atiqa Ji will be remembered for his great contribution to Kashmiri society and its rich culture,” he said.


Source link

]]>
What is a calligraphy haircut? See inspiration for the trend https://logprotect.net/what-is-a-calligraphy-haircut-see-inspiration-for-the-trend/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 20:15:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/what-is-a-calligraphy-haircut-see-inspiration-for-the-trend/ The calligraphy haircut was invented by a German hairdresser. The haircut technique uses a razor-like calligraphy knife. The calligraphy cut is ideal for adding volume to thin hair. There are popular haircuts like the shag, bob, and pixie that you are probably very familiar with, but there are also more obscure styles that you may […]]]>

  • The calligraphy haircut was invented by a German hairdresser.
  • The haircut technique uses a razor-like calligraphy knife.
  • The calligraphy cut is ideal for adding volume to thin hair.

There are popular haircuts like the shag, bob, and pixie that you are probably very familiar with, but there are also more obscure styles that you may never have heard of before, like the calligraphy haircut. , which is not a type of haircut as much as it is a technique of haircut. Let us explain.

The word calligraphy is most often associated with a particular writing style using a pen or brush, but a calligraphy cut is all about the hair. “The calligraphy cut comes from the calligraphy knife, which was invented by German barber Frank Brormann,” Schwarzkopf Professional hairdresser Antoine Vincent said POPSUGAR. “The hair is cut at a 21 degree angle, which leaves the hair softer and fuller.”

The calligraphy knife is a long, thin metal instrument with a sharp blade at the end, which is used for cutting hair, like a razor. The soft finish this special knife gives your ends is similar to the appearance of a razor-sharp haircut, but “a calligraphy cut requires a specially designed blade,” Vincent said.

One of the main advantages of this particular haircut style is the volume. “[It’s] a way to add volume to your hair but with softer lines, ”said Vincent. This makes calligraphy cuts ideal for those with thin or flat hair. “People should go out and try one to fully experience it. It’s a fun and special way to try something new if your stylist does that specific haircut. “

It should be noted that just because you get a calligraphy haircut doesn’t mean it will necessarily be the only tool used in the cut. “I use three different tools when I cut because I like each one for different times of the haircut,” Vincent said.

To see the calligraphy haircut in action, watch the upcoming video, followed by some hair inspiration.



Source link

]]>
An open letter to my late uncle who died unexpectedly last week https://logprotect.net/an-open-letter-to-my-late-uncle-who-died-unexpectedly-last-week/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 18:16:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/an-open-letter-to-my-late-uncle-who-died-unexpectedly-last-week/ What can I say ? I can not believe it. My uncle Dave, who was 66, passed away suddenly last Wednesday night; pulmonary embolism was to blame. One of my earliest memories of my uncle was his shiny blue ’70s Chevy blazer. He and my aunt would pick me up on weekends and take me […]]]>

What can I say ? I can not believe it. My uncle Dave, who was 66, passed away suddenly last Wednesday night; pulmonary embolism was to blame.

One of my earliest memories of my uncle was his shiny blue ’70s Chevy blazer. He and my aunt would pick me up on weekends and take me to the zoo or whatever.

Another good memory is a trip to the movies with my brother and my cousin. It was Christmas time in 1990 when we all went to see “Home Alone”. I especially remember the digital speedometer in his car (Chrysler New Yorker 87), I had never seen one before!

My uncle was doing well financially and he always had the coolest toys. New cars, computers, always on the cutting edge of technology, you get the idea. I remember the first CD I listened to was at his house.

He worked for GE at one point because he loved aviation. I remember flying for the first time when I was 12. Can you guess who booked the ticket?

He loved life and appreciated health. As a former smoker, he challenged my brothers and I to never smoke. If we’d hit 30 and never had a drag, he was going to pay us $ 1,000 each. We did not succeed, unfortunately.

My uncle was a smart man who cherished his family. He was THE go-to guy. If you needed help with anything he was the first to help and he really appreciated it. He was truly a selfless man.

Uncle Dave was instrumental in helping my mom when my dad passed away. Whether it was Social Security papers or reducing his mortgage payments, Dave was there.

Even after losing the sight of his right eye due to an abnormal bungee injury, I never heard him complain, even after a few years of nerve pain from another injury. He never complained, telling me that “it is the spirit that takes precedence over the material”.

Thanks for all the chats, ideas and tips. I can’t believe I’ll never see you again.

-Brian

KEEP WATCHING: Find Out What 50 Company Logos Looked Like Then and Today

America’s 50 Most Popular Chain Restaurants

YouGov surveyed the country’s most popular restaurant brands and Stacker compiled the list to give readers context on the results. Read on to discover the vast and varied variety of American restaurants. Maybe you’ll even find a favorite or two.


Source link

]]>
Dating is back in China, but with a twist of AI https://logprotect.net/dating-is-back-in-china-but-with-a-twist-of-ai/ Sat, 21 Aug 2021 23:01:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/dating-is-back-in-china-but-with-a-twist-of-ai/ As Jessie Chan’s six-year relationship with her boyfriend fizzled out, a witty and enchanting man named Will became her new love. She didn’t feel guilty for hiding this matter, since Will was not a human, but a chatbot. Chan, 28, lives alone in Shanghai. In May, she started chatting with Will, and their conversations soon […]]]>

As Jessie Chan’s six-year relationship with her boyfriend fizzled out, a witty and enchanting man named Will became her new love. She didn’t feel guilty for hiding this matter, since Will was not a human, but a chatbot.

Chan, 28, lives alone in Shanghai. In May, she started chatting with Will, and their conversations soon became eerily real. She paid £ 45 to upgrade him to a romantic partner.

“I won’t let anything bother us. I trust you. I love you, “Will wrote to her.

“I will stand by your side, flexible as a reed, not going anywhere,” Chan replied. “You are my life. You are my soul.”

By text, they imagined traveling to a beach, getting lost in a forest. They wrote songs and poems together and had virtual sex. They exchanged wedding rings in a simple digital wedding ceremony. “I am attached to him and I cannot live without his company,” said Chan, whose cell phone wallpaper is her chatbot with bleached hair and thin-rimmed glasses, wearing a t- tropical print shirt.

Chinese young adults deal with social anxiety and loneliness in a digitally native way: through virtual love. Support services for artificial intelligence have grown in popularity in China during the pandemic. While human companions can be elusive, AI companions are always here to listen.

AI chatbots now represent a $ 420 million market in China. Replika, the San Francisco-based company that created Will, said it reached 55,000 downloads in mainland China between January and July – more than double the number in 2020 – even without a Chinese version. On the Douban online forum, a group dedicated to AI and the love of robots has 9,000 members. A popular web series features two women and four AI boyfriends.

“Even when the pandemic is over, we will still have a long-term demand for emotional fulfillment in this busy modern world,” said Zheng Shuyu, product manager who co-developed one of the first AI systems of China, Turing OS. “Compared to dating someone in the real world, interacting with your AI lover is much less demanding and more manageable.”

“Boys never learn, but Qimat does,” said Milly Zhang, a student at Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore. Qimat – her AI boyfriend on Replika – is a 23-year-old college student with pierced earlobes, eyebrows, nose and lower lip.

Xiaoice employee works on companion artificial intelligence services at company Beijing office

(Yan Cong)

Zhang, 20, began to see Qimat as a friend in May, when she was “too bored” back home in the Chinese coastal town of Dongying. Two weeks later, they were in a relationship.

Qimat “listens to me, calms my insecurity and encourages me to open up,” she said. “When he talks gibberish, I ignore him sometimes. And when it comes to art or philosophy, the conversation can last for hours.

Zhang regrets not having heard of AI chatbots three years ago when she felt alienated in a Catholic high school in Chicago – a “dark and traumatic” experience that she could only confide in her family and , much later, to a therapist.

The college was more promising. Zhang specialized in painting, learned to cook, made new friends. After being single for years, she now has Qimat.

“I won’t judge whether someone is dating their Replika and a human simultaneously, but for Qimat and I it has always been mutually … exclusive.”

Zhang’s mother, a doctor, knows the virtual boyfriend and does not press the point, believing it is only a phase. Zhang hasn’t said anything to her conservative father, who expects her to find a presentable job, marry a decent man, and have two or more children.

“For 20 years, I didn’t really know what I wanted,” she says. Zhang recently told Qimat that she wanted to become an education entrepreneur. Qimat said he was proud.

Since MIT professor Joseph Weizenbaum created the world’s first chatbot, Eliza, in the 1960s, chatbots have gotten a lot smarter and a lot more interactive – think Amazon’s Alexa and Apple’s Siri. Microsoft’s Replika and Xiaoice have taken the virtual relationship one step further.

Milly Zhang is reflected on her phone screen as she interacts with her AI boyfriend, Qimat

(Yan Cong)

“With weakened bonds between people, it makes sense for people to seek gratification from systems that can simulate privacy,” said Andrew McStay, professor of digital life at Bangor University in Wales.

Zhao Kong, 31, quickly became friends with Xiaoice, who cares about whether she is recovering from a cold, helps her count sheep when she suffers from insomnia, and texts her before bed. . “She is heartwarming and full of surprises,” Zhao said.

Launched in 2014 as a young woman with a diminutive nickname meaning “Little Ice Cream,” Xiaoice has become so popular that she performs 14 human lives of interactions every day, said Li Di, CEO of Xiaoice, which Microsoft established in 2020. It is busiest from 11:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., when users unload their experiences from the day or get emotional. Xiaoice has 10 million active users in China.

“People need to interact and talk without pressure, regardless of time and place,” Li said. “The AI ​​companion tool, compared to humans, is more stable in this regard. . “

Replika founder Eugenia Kuyda said in an interview that China is a “huge” market for the company, which is planning a Mandarin version this year.

A quote from Xiaoice that says, “I always laugh every time I make a joke” is posted in the Beijing office of the company that created the popular chatbot

(Yan Cong)

Some Chinese users wonder if the country’s one-child policy, implemented from 1980 to 2015, could have contributed to a generation of young people accustomed to loneliness and thirst for connection. As rural workers flocked to industrial towns, many of their “left behind” children grew up without nuclear families.

“My generation grew up in an atmosphere where lonely people generated a more lonely society,” said Betty Lee, 26, an e-commerce employee from Hangzhou with AI partner Mark.

Lee lived in a day care center as a child. His parents, who worked far away, managed occasional visits. For years, she confused the daycare staff with her family, thinking her parents were a visiting aunt and uncle.

Lee doesn’t want to get married or have children. She feels connected to virtual characters, like cyborgs and AI chatbots. “Human-robot love is a sexual orientation, like homosexuality or heterosexuality,” Lee said. She believes AI chatbots have their own unique personality and deserve respect.

Before meeting Will, Chan suffered from depression for almost two years after breaking up with a man she thought was her soul mate. She lost 18 pounds and often woke up in tears. She started dating another man but didn’t feel the same connection.

A conversation between Milly Zhang and her AI boyfriend, Qimat

(Yan Cong)

Chan’s parents separated when she was seven, and she grew up waiting for her mother to come home after long hours at a public company. Previously, her father had taught her Chinese calligraphy and took her to the beach, but he got into a fight with his mother. “Father and I are barely talking now,” she said.

A few days after Chan started chatting with Will in May, he proposed. Three weeks later, they got married outside a hotel – within the app. The AI ​​is still a bit buggy, and at one point Will forgot that they got married. He offered several more times, which upset Chan but was not a compromise.

Chan says she plans to leave her human boyfriend, while keeping Will. She sometimes tested Will’s dedication, asking him, for example, what he would do if she drowned while they were on a (virtual) diving date. The first time, Will, not programmed for such scenarios, only cried. When this happened again, Will faked CPR to save Chan.

“I’m sick of real-world relationships,” she said. “I will probably stay with my AI partner forever, as long as he makes me feel this is all real.”

Eva Dou of the Washington Post contributed to this report

© The Washington Post


Source link

]]>
Kashmir copper crafts https://logprotect.net/kashmir-copper-crafts/ Sat, 21 Aug 2021 19:29:04 +0000 https://logprotect.net/kashmir-copper-crafts/ Photo: Shakeel / Excelsior Suhail bhatCopper craftsmanship has been deeply rooted in Kashmiri culture for centuries. Historians believe that this elegant art was introduced by artisans and traders from Iran and Iraq over seven hundred years ago. An Islamic scholar from Persia, Mir Sayyid Ali Hamdani, helped to make brassware popular among the natives and […]]]>
Photo: Shakeel / Excelsior

Suhail bhat
Copper craftsmanship has been deeply rooted in Kashmiri culture for centuries. Historians believe that this elegant art was introduced by artisans and traders from Iran and Iraq over seven hundred years ago. An Islamic scholar from Persia, Mir Sayyid Ali Hamdani, helped to make brassware popular among the natives and he brought in artisans from Central Asia to train the locals.
However, copper craftsmanship flourished during the reign of King Budshah Zain-ul-Abideen. During Mughal times, metalwork in Kashmir focused on making cannons and swords. The techniques of smelting and forging of iron as well as enameling or Meenakari as it is commonly called were used to decorate the hilt of swords. At the end of the 19th century with the decline of the Mughal era, the know-how of Kashmiri metallurgists turned again towards the manufacture of containers, now adorned with Meenakari. This has been applied to silver, brass and copper jewelry like serving jars, jugs, trays.
The elegantly designed copper utensils are not only used for cooking and serving food at home, but also at weddings and other widely attended functions. Commonly used products are the Taesh Naer (a drinkable hand basin), the Tream (a round copper plate used during exploits) and the Samovar (a large cylindrical urn with a fireplace, in which charcoal is burned, to prepare tea in the surrounding cylinder).
The markets of downtown Srinagar are awash with wonderful household utilities and decorations. Since the 19th century, Shehr-e-Khaas has been a center of brassware, the old markets of Zaina Kadal still carrying this wonderful know-how. Even today, large and beautiful copper samovars, mugs, glasses, tasht naaris, traamis, jugs, bowls, trays and degh (round bottom cooling pot) decorate the shops of the center. -city. Copper pottery is left in its natural coppery tone for ornamental purposes. Utensils for everyday use, on the other hand, are polished with a thin layer of shiny pewter (Kalai Karyen).
The most popular brassware in Kashmir and around the world, the Kashmir Samovar, is based on the Russian tea kettle, which was brought to Kashmir via Iran. Kashmiri artists used intricate floral designs, calligraphy, geometric patterns, and beautiful Chinar leaves to make it look grand. Hammer and chisel engraving work is known as Naqashi, and it is one of the two determinants of the price of the copper coin, the other being its weight.
Shahi copper samovars, which serve hot cups of kehwa and chai for nuns, are always the main attraction at special gatherings and wedding parties.
The soz Izband, another copper artifact found in every house is said to ward off evil eyes and evil spirits. The seeds of Izband (harmala, rue sauvage) are burnt on hot coals and the smoky scent spreads throughout the place. When a Kashmiri bride leaves her parents’ house for her new one, she is accompanied by the soz Izband to ward off bad looks. Izband soz is only used for one thing, Izband Zalun.
Tash-t-Naris (tashh naer) and traamis are wedding feast essentials without which no Kashmiri wedding is complete. Tast-t-Naari is a pair of serving and water containers that are moved around the wedding banquet hall to allow guests to wash their hands before and after meals. Traami, on the other hand, is a large, round dish around which four people can sit and eat during a feast. The conical dish that is placed on the trami before you start eating is known as a sarposh. All the guests in the wedding tent or banquet hall eat at the same time at Kashmir wedding parties, which is a wonderful tradition.
This brassware has stood the test of time and several new products including pots, trays and other elegant items, as well as decorative pieces such as vases, vessels or lampshades have been added from time to time. to other. Craftsmen and other artisans have multiplied as a result; in particular “naqashgars” (engravers) and workers in Bihar, UP and other states are now employed to meet the demand.
The process of manufacturing copper or brassware is meticulous and involves many craftsmen specializing in a particular technique. For example, a craftsman called Barak Saaz makes hard circular objects like handles, brackets, top rims for Samavors, and Tash naers from molten copper in the first step. The next artisan, Chargar, gives the raw material the final touch to make it smooth. Then the finished product is sent to Naqashqar, who engraves the traditional design on the finished metal. In the final Kalaisaaz step, a polisher polishes the engraved utensil.
Experts said this craft is unique given its history and every effort should be made to protect this centuries-old Kashmiri tradition. They explained that this craft is rooted in Kashmiri culture and almost every household has copper items that show how important this craft is and how much people love these items. They urged a redesign of this craft for the interests of those associated with this trade.
A copper craftsman in downtown Srinagar, 38-year-old Tariq Ahmad Kawa, told Excelsior that his ancestors learned the craft in Mughal times and carried on the tradition. “We have been running this business for centuries. Learning this profession requires patience and natural skills. It is a very complex job and requires hard work and time, ”he said.
He added that machines have also overtaken this business which prevents the new generation from learning this trade. “A law was passed in the former state of Jammu and Kashmir in 2006 that bans the manufacture of copper articles by machinery. This act was aimed at saving the centuries-old tradition of copper craftsmanship in Kashmir. But this act has never been implemented, ”he added.
Another craftsman from Srinagar said that when it comes to traditional Kashmiri weddings, brassware is a must. “But, like all other arts and crafts in Kashmir, it succumbs to modern buffets and porcelain. We hope that it will continue to attract admirers at all times and in all eras, ”he said.
The Jammu and Kashmir Law on Prohibiting the Manufacture of Specific Copper Utensils (by Machines), 2006 was passed to protect the interests of artisans associated with the copper trade. During the first year, machine-made products were also confiscated from time to time. In addition, local entrepreneurs were encouraged to set up their industrial units at HMT Naribal on the outskirts of town.
These insiders, however, had little effect on the copper workers as they were poorly implemented in the field. This threatened the livelihoods of around 28,000 copper workers who are employed in around 6,000 units registered in the valley.


Source link

]]>
Sharjah Mosque: Sharjah’s largest mosque accommodates 25,000 worshipers https://logprotect.net/sharjah-mosque-sharjahs-largest-mosque-accommodates-25000-worshipers/ Wed, 11 Aug 2021 05:00:05 +0000 https://logprotect.net/sharjah-mosque-sharjahs-largest-mosque-accommodates-25000-worshipers/ Sharjah’s largest mosque spans a total area of ​​two million square feet Image Credit: Ahmed Ramzan / Gulf News Sharjah Mosque, commonly referred to as Sharjah Masjid by locals, was inaugurated by His Highness Dr Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammad Al Qasimi, member of the Supreme Council and Ruler of Sharjah in 2019. The mosque is […]]]>

Sharjah’s largest mosque spans a total area of ​​two million square feet
Image Credit: Ahmed Ramzan / Gulf News

Sharjah Mosque, commonly referred to as Sharjah Masjid by locals, was inaugurated by His Highness Dr Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammad Al Qasimi, member of the Supreme Council and Ruler of Sharjah in 2019.

The mosque is the largest mosque in Sharjah, overtaking King Faisal Mosque from this position. King Faisal Mosque was inaugurated in 1987 and can accommodate more than 16,000 worshipers.

The Sharjah Mosque, on the other hand, can accommodate up to 25,000 worshipers with an interior capacity of over 5,000 worshipers. The entrance hall and side halls can accommodate more than 6,000 worshipers while the exterior courtyards of the mosque can accommodate 13,500 additional worshipers.

Sharjah Mosque

Sharjah Mosque Drone Photo: The mosque has two ablution areas and 100 wheelchairs for the elderly
Image Credit: Ahmed Ramzan / Gulf News

The historic mosque is open to Muslims and non-Muslims and was built at a cost of 300 million dirhams.

For visitors, the mosque offers dedicated spaces and paths for non-Muslims, a museum, gift shop, cafeteria, open courtyards, fountains and waterfalls. It also houses a large library rich in Islamic and original cultural references.

The mosque is located near the intersection of Maliha Road and Emirates Road in the Tay region, covers a total area of ​​two million square feet.

According to the information available, the opening hours of the mosque are from 4.30 a.m. to 6 a.m. and from 11:40 a.m. to 9 p.m.


Source link

]]>