Calligraphy styles – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 18:52:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://logprotect.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-29T151759.208-150x150.png Calligraphy styles – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ 32 32 Graffiti Museum to Feature Gray Matter 3.0: The Monochromatic Works of Doze Green – Boca Raton’s Most Reliable News Source https://logprotect.net/graffiti-museum-to-feature-gray-matter-3-0-the-monochromatic-works-of-doze-green-boca-ratons-most-reliable-news-source/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 17:09:27 +0000 https://logprotect.net/graffiti-museum-to-feature-gray-matter-3-0-the-monochromatic-works-of-doze-green-boca-ratons-most-reliable-news-source/ July 28 – August 28, 2022 Miami, FL – The Museum of Graffiti is pleased to announce the upcoming opening of a solo exhibition by contemporary graffiti artist and artist Doze Green. The show opens on July 28, 2022 and will be on view until August 28, 2022. Gray Matter 3.0 consists of monochromatic works […]]]>

July 28 – August 28, 2022

Miami, FL – The Museum of Graffiti is pleased to announce the upcoming opening of a solo exhibition by contemporary graffiti artist and artist Doze Green. The show opens on July 28, 2022 and will be on view until August 28, 2022.

Gray Matter 3.0 consists of monochromatic works created with mixed media on canvas and paper that are an exploration of human consciousness rooted in the artist’s study of Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Jung. Green explores the four Jungian archetypes: Persona, Animus, Shadow and Self. Green’s paintings convey a sense of discordant emotions, chaotic flows, fear, loss and inner conflicts experienced in our psyche. In each painting, Green presents an interpretation of the collective state of human experience and his own efforts to pierce the veil of the unconscious. Green states that “the series explores the search for the truest version of oneself. What have we compromised with our current state of being? »

The artist presents figures emerging from gray monochromatic layers of overlapping paint and semi-transparent glazes. In Green’s lines there is a sense of urgency – the white lines represent the soul with a direct line to the divine. Black accents represent protection from the jumbled memories and words spilling over the transparent gray and white wash paintings. On canvas, the figures are in transformation to become their higher self and thus emerge semi-revealed, superimposed and partially concealed. For Green, this energy and movement of created forms exist in a visual meeting place of ideas. Influenced by paintings from the Edo period, Green mixes black gesso with Sumi ink and applies “creative, chaotic and intuitive brushstrokes” in an aesthetic inspired by calligraphy and graffiti.

Doze began creating street and train art in New York City in the 1980s, when hip-hop was at its height and B-Boys (break dancers) ruled the streets. Doze has honed its craft, led by intuitive flow, and moved from letter forms to character forms. He was the first of his peers to create a drawing style that was adopted by graffiti artists around the world. Breaking away from his old “mugsy” personas, Doze moved on to illustrating and painting biological entities from metaphysical spirits. His work celebrates his Cubist influences and includes ascending and descending planes and repeating, overlapping, concentric lines in an otherwise undefined landscape.

About Doze Green:Doze Green is a renowned graffiti artist, social commentator and original member of the legendary hip-hop breakdancer Rocksteady Crew. In the 1970s, Doze perfected his artistic street style on the walls of New York’s subways and streetcars. He appeared in the Flashdance, Style Wars and Wildstyle movies. From B-boy to graffiti legend, Doze Green has gone from marking the hallways of South Bronx projects to performing on the world stage. Over the years Doze Green’s paintings have retained the spirit of graffiti, they tell the stories of the lost, the heroes and the downtrodden, which continue to go largely unrecognized. In the process, he became a supporter of the avant-garde “fusionist” art movement. Best known for his characters, Doze focuses on canvases that mix wild style techniques with metaphysical concepts.

Green has exhibited his work in art spaces such as the OK Harris Gallery, the Tony Shafrazi Gallery and the fun gallery. Doze Green’s work is included in numerous public and private collections in the United States, Japan, Europe and Australia. His works have been published in BlackBook, Anthem, Juxtapoz, Tokion and Vibe and reviewed on CNN.

  • Tickets: General admission tickets are $16; Children 13 and under are free. Tickets are available online and include access to all museum exhibits. To purchase tickets, visit our website from your home computer or mobile device, museumofgraffiti.com
  • Opening hours: The Graffiti Museum is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays and from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekends. Please check www.museumofgraffiti.com for special holidays, extended hours and unexpected closures.
  • Location: The Museum of Graffiti, located at 276 NW 26th Street, Miami, FL 33127.
  • Follow the Graffiti Museum on Instagram @museumofgraffiti
  • For more information and press images or to schedule a press tour, contact Cece Feinberg, Cece Feinberg Public Relations at [email protected]

    About the Museum of GraffitiLocated in Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood, the Museum of Graffiti is a premier contemporary art museum dedicated to sharing the power of expression, wonder, and inspiring creativity for and about movement of graffiti art. At the Graffiti Museum, visitors can explore the history of graffiti in an experiential setting with interactive exhibits and unique performances. The museum seeks to honor and preserve this unique art form and exhibit significant works for permanent viewing. Through changing exhibitions and programs, the museum aims to introduce visitors to the artists, paintings, photos, sculptures, works on paper and drawings that have captivated young people and adults for more than fifty years, as well as than the environment in which the global art movement was formed.

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The City of Pigs LARP – Review https://logprotect.net/the-city-of-pigs-larp-review/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/the-city-of-pigs-larp-review/ Spoiler Warning: To discuss the background of this manga, the final twist is included in this review. The city of pigs marks a long-deserved comeback from Hideshi Hinoa central horror manga artist whose work has not been published in the United States for over a decade. Junji Itō has received a lot more mainstream attention […]]]>

Spoiler Warning: To discuss the background of this manga, the final twist is included in this review.

The city of pigs marks a long-deserved comeback from Hideshi Hinoa central horror manga artist whose work has not been published in the United States for over a decade. Junji Itō has received a lot more mainstream attention in recent years, and we can partly credit that success for reviving western publishers’ interest in horror manga. We finally get some of Kazuo Umezz’s work with the new Orochi versions, but unlike the art of Umezz and Ito which is more aesthetically pleasing, I’m happy to report that Hino’s work is weird looking at.

Hino cut his teeth Garo, an underground manga magazine synonymous with experimentation. Unlike most mainstream artists of the time, Hino’s characters are shamelessly ugly. Kenichi’s large, protruding eyes are quirky, and his sleek black hair evokes comparisons to Peter Lorre. He navigates the ruins of the city that appear to have been drawn with excess black ink onto the page with a calligraphy brush. His pursuers are armored men on horseback who are called demons, not because of their appearance but because of their vicious cruelty.

Although there is a caricatural undercurrent to The city of pigsart, he does not hesitate to stage the brutality of the invaders. They decapitate women and children, exhibit skinned pig carcasses to send a message to potential idlers and generally revel in their destruction. Make no mistake, this may be sold as a manga about demons turning humans into pigs, but the allegory here is one day clear. It’s the war.

The city of pigs is a quick read, maybe 20-30 minutes, with minimal dialogue and a threadless story. A boy, Kenichi, manages to escape the invading “demons” who arrive in the light of a full moon. His family, neighbors and the rest of the town are rounded up and put into wagons to be taken to prison camps. There they are fed mud which gradually turns them into pigs to be sacrificed for manual labor, all in pursuit of building a giant effigy that bears at least some resemblance to That of the Exorcist Pazuzu. Kenichi makes various attempts to escape the borders of the decimated city for nothing, only to discover that he has more in common with his oppressors than he thought.

After completing the volume, readers will likely find themselves at a loss. It’s an allegory but unfortunately Star Fruit Books‘ lacks a vanguard, author biography, or any other context that might help English readers fully appreciate Hino’s story. The final pages show Kenichi spiraling after the revelation that the demons all share his face. He thinks it all makes so much sense now. However, why this makes sense is not revealed to the reader. It wasn’t until I researched superficial information about Hino’s life that this blurred area-the style twist made no sense apart from trying to surprise the reader. Initially, it looked like Hino was using WWII footage to The city of pigs and I assumed that the demons could very well be replacements for the American occupation forces. Until the twist, of course. It turns out that Hino has a very personal experience with Japanese imperialism and, well, with pigs.

I wish this release had included a little biography of Hino in the sequel, not only to contextualize the story but also to make it a more in-depth take on the work of an author who has been overlooked for so long. Some additional information on the importance of Garo and its place in the manga landscape would also have been appreciated. However, this version is not without advantages. Star Fruit Books‘ used white paper instead of cream paper as well as digital printing instead of offset printing. The result is art with a glossier finish and richer blacks than is typical of manga releases. Overall, it packs a little more punch for what is otherwise a smaller page count.

I’m excited that we’re starting to have more variety in the horror manga space and while I wouldn’t consider this a “definitive release”, I hope Star Fruit and other publishers start exploring older works from the Garo Library and similar magazines. There is a wealth of shoujo horror and experimental styles to explore and my shelf awaits.

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This Calicut Fusion House Has Surprises Galore Inside | lifestyle decor https://logprotect.net/this-calicut-fusion-house-has-surprises-galore-inside-lifestyle-decor/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 01:47:29 +0000 https://logprotect.net/this-calicut-fusion-house-has-surprises-galore-inside-lifestyle-decor/ Anshu, an expat, is thrilled to show around his brand new home in his hometown of Kinalur, Kozhikode, Kerala. An admirer of contemporary and Arabic architectural styles, Anshu was keen to try fusion design for his dream home. He is thrilled that the architect designed the perfect home as he envisioned it. The structure stands […]]]>

Anshu, an expat, is thrilled to show around his brand new home in his hometown of Kinalur, Kozhikode, Kerala. An admirer of contemporary and Arabic architectural styles, Anshu was keen to try fusion design for his dream home. He is thrilled that the architect designed the perfect home as he envisioned it.

The structure stands in the center of the 30 cent plot. Thus, there is enough space in the front yard for a splendid landscape. The driveway is paved with natural stones and grass. Interestingly, the majestic beauty of the house could be appreciated, in all its grandeur, from the road.


Groves were added during the plastering work. The exterior walls have been painted in a light golden hue to give a regal look. Meanwhile, the sloping roof is paved with tiles. The Arabic calligraphy design on the facade is quite prominent. Anshu says this unique calligraphy design intrigued many.

Spanning 4,247 square feet, this lavish mansion features a car porch, formal and family living areas, a dining area, a kitchen with a work area, five bedrooms, an upper living room, and a balcony as well.


From the porch one could enter the spacious sit-out and fire pit. Interestingly, the fabulous view of the dining room could be captured from the sit-out. The formal living space, on the other hand, has been laid out ensuring sufficient privacy. This area would be detached from the rest of the house if the doors were closed there.


The regal elegance of the marble flooring is the highlight of the interiors. Meanwhile, bespoke furniture adds panache to glamorously designed spaces.


The dining table set made by paving a Korean top in a wooden frame is very unique. Besides this main dining area, there is a mini dining area near the kitchen. The walls opposite the dining table are decorated with attractive wallpapers.


The staircase has handrails that feature the classic combination of wood and glass. A study space has been provided under the stairs to make the interiors space-saving. Besides, plenty of storage spaces in an eye-catching blue color theme are also arranged here.


The pool table in the upper living room lends a chic style to this space. The entrance to the balcony is also here. Anshu says the balcony is her favorite place to enjoy the mesmerizing charm of the aesthetically designed landscape.


The island kitchen is modern and has all luxury fittings. A quaint breakfast counter has been installed under the hood and hob. The cabinets, on the other hand, are made of plywood with a laminate finish. Nano white has been tiled across the counter, adding a clean look to the kitchen.


There are two bedrooms on the ground floor while three are on the upper floor. All bedrooms are en-suite and also have wardrobes.


The construction of this beautiful house had started during the pandemic days. Even if the works were blocked during the period of confinement, the family is happy to have moved into the mansion of their dreams.

Project Facts

Location – Kinalur, Calicut

Land – 30 cents

Area – 4247 SFT

Owner – Anshu

Engineer – Biju

Designer – Shanavas Kuruppath

Shanavas and associates

Crowd – 9048492757

Completion year – 2022

Photos – Akhil Komachy

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Singapore’s Asian Civilizations Museum to Share Southeast Asian Batik Legacy in Upcoming Exhibition https://logprotect.net/singapores-asian-civilizations-museum-to-share-southeast-asian-batik-legacy-in-upcoming-exhibition/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 23:21:52 +0000 https://logprotect.net/singapores-asian-civilizations-museum-to-share-southeast-asian-batik-legacy-in-upcoming-exhibition/ Singapore’s Asian Civilizations Museum (ACM) will celebrate Southeast Asia’s diverse legacies with ‘Batik Kita: Dressing in Port Cities’, its latest special exhibition showcasing over 100 masterpieces from foreign and local lenders, as well as rarely seen pieces from the national collection. . Open to the public this Friday, the fabrics and garments tell stories of […]]]>

Singapore’s Asian Civilizations Museum (ACM) will celebrate Southeast Asia’s diverse legacies with ‘Batik Kita: Dressing in Port Cities’, its latest special exhibition showcasing over 100 masterpieces from foreign and local lenders, as well as rarely seen pieces from the national collection. .

Open to the public this Friday, the fabrics and garments tell stories of how batik was made, worn and traded. Batik Kita explores the rich history and culture of batik and batik making, from its traditional roots to contemporary designs. Visitors are invited to enter an exquisite world of batik textiles that cross cultures and ethnic backgrounds.

The exhibit also showcases batikers’ innovations in age-old craftsmanship and shows how batik charted the evolution of new identities in the newly formed nations of Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore.

Kennie Ting, Director of ACM and the Peranakan Museum, shared, “Visitors can expect an introduction to batik as a historical art form, as well as an exploration of how batik has influenced the style in our region even today. The title, “Batik Kita” (“Our Batik”) celebrates batik as a form of shared cultural heritage in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, as well as greater Southeast Asia, with its textile traditions of long time. »

Tracing the development of batik through design

Batik first emerged as a highly efficient way of patterning fabrics in Java in the 17th century, and most batiks today are made and invented from the rich repertoire of patterns developed in central Javanese courts. from Yogyakarta and Surakarta (Solo).

Highlights include three pieces on loan from the Sonobudoyo Museum in Yogyakarta, offering a rare look at the traditional batiks used in Cirebon, a court located on the west coast of Java.

Besides the traditional Javanese court batik, Batik Kita offers a wide range of textiles, including pagi-sore (day-night) and tiga negeri (three-pattern) styles, fabrics with seafood and animal patterns, bangbangan (red batiks), and creative designs from Chinese-owned workshops along the pesisir (north coast of Java); as well as the use of canting (hand drawing) to write calligraphic inscriptions.

Keeping the heritage of batik alive

The second section of Batik Kita explores the transformations of batik as a fashion, highlighting batik makers past and present. The walls are lined with iron and copper batik pads made and used by IB Batek Industrial, a Singapore batik manufacturing powerhouse of the 1970s and 1980s.

While preserving batik heritage is important, batik as an art form continues to evolve with each generation. An exhibition of contemporary batik clothing takes center stage, featuring 20 loans from BINhouse, a textile company that is a primary arbiter of Indonesian batik fashion taste. Their shoulder pads pay homage to the South Sumatran style, large enough to cover the wearer’s head and body.

Made by Iwan Tirta, Indonesia's foremost batik designer, this silk batik shirt with an orchid motif was worn by Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong during APEC 1994 in Indonesia.

The power of batik as an expression of identity

The way people choose to adorn themselves goes beyond aesthetics: from wearing batik to show regional solidarity when doing business in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, to the historic group photo shoot where leaders of the region wore batik at the 1994 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Bogor, Indonesia, batik became an implicit display of soft power in the political arena.

Lee Chor Lin, curator of Batik Kita: Dressing in Port Cities, commented, “A large-scale batik retrospective like this has been a long time coming. Batik is enjoying a renaissance today, and I hope Batik Kita is just one of many other great batik exhibitions coming to Singapore.

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The best mosque design in the world in 2021 https://logprotect.net/the-best-mosque-design-in-the-world-in-2021/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 03:43:48 +0000 https://logprotect.net/the-best-mosque-design-in-the-world-in-2021/ A non-profit organization showcasing design and architectural work, the Abdullatif Al-Fozan Prize, recently released a list of the best mosque designs in the world. One of the buildings on the list is the Grand Mosque of West Sumatra, located in the city of Padang, West Sumatra. The award is an event that showcases the works […]]]>

A non-profit organization showcasing design and architectural work, the Abdullatif Al-Fozan Prize, recently released a list of the best mosque designs in the world.

One of the buildings on the list is the Grand Mosque of West Sumatra, located in the city of Padang, West Sumatra. The award is an event that showcases the works and designs of mosques from Muslim-populated countries around the world.

The construction of the mosque began on December 27, 2007 and was completed on February 7, 2014, due to budget restrictions. The regional government, local people, private companies and even foreign governments have helped make this mosque a reality. The Saudi government provided US$50 million for the construction of the mosque in 2009; however, this coincided with the 2009 West Sumatra earthquakes. Thus, the funds were diverted to the rehabilitation of earthquake victims and the restoration of West Sumatra. The Turkish government then donated carpets to the mosque in 2014.

Read also Top 10 mosques in Indonesia

Several factors contributed to help the Grand Mosque of West Sumatra win the best mosque design in the world in 2021. Quoting the Abdullatif Al-Fozan award Instagram account, the Grand Mosque of West Sumatra did not no dome like many other mosque designs. Instead, the roof of the mosque is designed in a rectangular, curved shape, with each corner rising skyward like a Roumah Gadang – a traditional Minangkabau house. The shape of the roof illustrates the laying of Hajar Aswad (black stone) using the Prophet Muhammad’s turban held by four chieftains of the Quraysh tribe at its corners in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. They disagreed on who had the right to move the black stone to its original location after the Kaaba was rebuilt.

The Grand Mosque of West Sumatra is located in a 40,343 square meter complex at the intersection of Jalan Khatib Sulaiman and Jalan Ahmad Dahlan. The construction of the building was designed to meet the geographical conditions of West Sumatra, an area repeatedly shaken by large earthquakes. It is supported by 631 piles with a pillar foundation with a diameter of 1.7 meters at a depth of 7.7 meters. Given its topographic condition in a marshy area, the depth of each foundation is not pegged because it adjusts the saturation point of the soil.

The main building consists of three floors. The main prayer hall is located on the second floor. The ground floor includes a prayer room, an ablution area and a parking lot. The mosque can accommodate 20,000 people. The designer of the Grand Mosque is Rizal Muslimin from the architectural office in Bandung, West Java, Urbane Indonesia (UI).

Looking at its interior, the mosque consists of the mihrab, Liwan (room or prayer room), and sahn (place of ablution). The mihrab section has a more modern design, which is an oval shape. In fact, the mihrab resembles the shape of black stone. It reminds me of Karim Rashid, a great designer renowned for his futuristic style. He often created designs similar to those of the mihrab of this mosque.

best mosque design

The Liwan mosque section looks very clean and solid due to the use of concrete and ceramic materials. The walls of the room are dominated by doors and windows with vertical holes that allow air to enter the room from the outside. There is the interior shape of the dome directly covering all the rooms on the ceiling. Although it does not show the shape of the dome on the outside, it can be seen inside the mosque. The ceiling is filled with Asmaul-Husna (99 names of Allah) in Arabic calligraphy and there is an arrangement of lamps hanging to form a circle on top of the ceiling in the middle of Liwan. This shows a modern form, making the traditional form, not visible from inside this mosque.

Theah in this mosque is designed in a very simple dark color. This place is designed to be open so that it is filled with fresh air. The ablution place is relatively modern and environmentally friendly judging by the use of a rainwater recycling system.

The architecture and interior of the Grand Mosque in West Sumatra is based on wooden materials with almost no glass. There are only circulation holes found in the carvings of the mosque walls, which are commonly found and used in a traditional Minangkabau house. This suggests that this mosque carries the eco-friendly concept of using nature as much as possible, also evidenced by the hall of the mosque which does not use an air conditioner.

When seen in the inner part of the room, it looks very different. The most important theme presented in this interior is modern and futuristic. This can be seen in the shape and the material used – marble, aluminium, garnet, etc. Basically, the architecture and interior design tries to combine traditional and modern concepts.

The Grand Mosque of West Sumatra has succeeded in integrating its purpose of an architectural structure that expresses its spirituality by adding elements of local culture. Despite being a place of worship, the uniqueness and splendor of the mosque has attracted many tourists.

The author is a lecturer at the Faculty of Human Sciences, Andalas University.

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Document Authentication – Manila Standard https://logprotect.net/document-authentication-manila-standard/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 16:10:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/document-authentication-manila-standard/ “Our courts cannot make a fair judgment if the documents presented and identified are based on fabricated facts” Documents are commonly used in courts or tribunals as evidence to prove a party’s claim, accusation or defense. It is imperative that documentary evidence marked, presented and identified in court is authentic. Otherwise, the truth will not […]]]>

“Our courts cannot make a fair judgment if the documents presented and identified are based on fabricated facts”

Documents are commonly used in courts or tribunals as evidence to prove a party’s claim, accusation or defense.

It is imperative that documentary evidence marked, presented and identified in court is authentic. Otherwise, the truth will not be established by our courts.

There is a notion that an original document presented and identified by a witness is automatically authentic or genuine. This is inaccurate because what may appear to be an original document may have been tampered with, forged or forged.

It is for this reason that any document presented, identified and marked in court must be authenticated.

During the pre-trial, the parties are required to mark their respective evidence, examine the copy and compare it to the original, and demonstrate in open court that the copy presented is a faithful reproduction of the original. (article 2, rule 18, rules of civil procedure).

Even after this point, the documentary evidence is still not definitively authenticated. Marking and matching of documents is done only to ensure that all evidence is available and marked before trial.

However, there are cases in the preliminary phase where the parties can agree on the authenticity and proper execution of the documents (article 2, rule 18).

There are also documents which are judicially admitted for authenticity and execution, such as litigant documents (which are the basis of the claim) not specifically denied under oath by the opposing party, and documents subject to and attached to an application for admission (section 7, rule 8; rule 26).

There are two categories of documents, public and private.

Public records include: (a) official written acts or records of sovereign authority, whether of the Philippines or a foreign country; (b) documents acknowledged before a notary public; (c) documents deemed to be public documents under treaties and conventions; and (d) public registers of private documents required to be registered in the Philippines (Article 19, Rule 132, Rules of Evidence).

All other documents or writings are private.

However, it is not enough to present, mark and identify a document to authenticate it. It must go through an authentication process in accordance with the requirements of the Rules of Court, which may vary depending on the nature and type of document.

Official written acts or records of sovereign authority may be authenticated by official publication or certificate of the officer holding the document (Section 24, Rule 132).

This is publicly known as a “certified true copy,” obtained from government agencies or entities. Examples of these documents are laws, government rules and regulations, letters of authorization from the Bureau of Internal Revenue, or court decisions.

Any person who has obtained an official published copy or a certified copy of the public document may be called as a witness. The author of the official document or the head of the agency is not required to appear in court to authenticate the public document.

Documents acknowledged before the notary public are authenticated by presenting the notarized document with the “acknowledgment” as evidence.

It is not necessary to present the notary public as a witness since the acknowledgment is a prima facie proof of the execution of the document (article 30, rule 132).

The notary public will only be presented if there are questions about the authenticity and proper execution of the document, such as falsification, insertion of information or falsification of signatures.

Absent these issues, a party or witness to a notarized document can testify to identify the document in court.

Not all notarized documents should be considered public documents. Only those that are duly acknowledged before the notary public are considered public documents within the meaning of the Regulations.

A “jurat” is a deed, but will not convert or make the document a public document (Francisco, Evidence; citing court rules review committee minutes).

Public documents under existing treaties and conventions between the Philippines and the country of origin are authenticated by a certificate or form prescribed in the treaty or convention.

An example is the Apostille Convention, which entered into force in the Philippines on May 14, 2019 after the Philippines acceded to it on September 12, 2018.

Under this convention, cumbersome legalization requirements in different jurisdictions are eliminated. The internationally accepted certificate, also called an “extension”, satisfies the authentication requirement.

However, this only applies between and among countries that have signed or acceded to the convention. The certificate must contain: (a) authentication of the signer’s signature; (b) the capacity in which the signatory is acting; and (c) where applicable, the identity of the seal or stamp it bears (Article 2, Apostille Convention).

The officer or the diplomatic agent does not need to be presented as a witness in court, since the presentation of the extension will suffice to authenticate the document attached to it and to which reference is made. The person who requested and processed the certificate or extension may be presented in court as a witness to identify him or her.

In the event that the foreign country from which the document originates is not a party to the Apostille Convention or other conventions, the secretary of the embassy or consular officers of the Philippines in the foreign country, in which the document is preserved, may authenticate it by the seal of their office (Article 24, Rule 132).

The consular office certificate can be identified in a Philippine court by a witness who has requested and authenticated it.

Consular officials who have signed the certificate and affixed the office seal are not required to appear as witnesses.

The most common public documents are private documents registered in a public office.

It is the registration of the document, as required by law, that makes it a public document. Examples are birth certificates, marriage certificates, death certificates, affidavits of adverse claim, and land registry certificates, among others.

This type of public document is proven by the original of the document in the custody of the person concerned or by obtaining a certified copy of the private document registered in the public office where it is kept ( article 27, rule 132).

Conversely, if there is no such registration in the office, it will issue a certificate of no registration. In both cases, the person who requested it can be presented as a witness to identify the certificate.

On the other hand, private documents can be proven authentic by (a) anyone who has seen the signed or written document; (b) proof of the authenticity of the handwriting or signature of the manufacturer; or (c) other evidence demonstrating its proper execution and authenticity (Article 20, Rule 132).

A witness who saw the person writing, or who acted or was responsible for the person’s documents, may be called as a witness to prove the authenticity of the handwriting.

A comparison made by the witness or the court, with a specimen of handwriting considered authentic by the other party, can be used to prove its authenticity (article 22, rule 132).

Also, a person sufficiently familiar with another person’s handwriting may be called as a witness (Article 53, Rule 130).

After complying with the authentication of the documents, these must then be formally offered.

According to the Rules, the Court will not consider evidence that has not been formally presented (article 34, rule 132). In simpler terms, only documents formally offered and admitted by the court can be taken into account in rendering judgment.

Authentication of documents is essential to the orderly administration and fair settlement of business.

Our courts cannot make a fair judgment if the documents presented and identified are based on fabricated facts.

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When in Shanghai… – SupChina https://logprotect.net/when-in-shanghai-supchina/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 13:03:18 +0000 https://logprotect.net/when-in-shanghai-supchina/ When in Shanghai… – SupChina Jump straight to content Search any company based in China Search any company based in ChinaBeijingWeimeng ChuangkeBeijing SohuBaozunTuniu CorporationGenetron ManagementCanton RailwayCNOOCTrip to ShanghaiGuangdong Hybribio BiotechOcean-scale investmentGuangshen RailwayVNET GroupSohuCITICJCET GroupGenetron HealthZhejiang Geely Holding GroupChina Development Bank International InvestmentCASILBYD automaticBeiGene (Beijing)Beijing Pingxin Media CultureBeijing JD36Kr holdingsBaidu (China)Qianjin Network Information Technology (Shanghai)GAIGAVISHINETaobao China […]]]>




When in Shanghai… – SupChina





















Jump straight to content

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The minister cuts the ribbon for the new miniature museum https://logprotect.net/the-minister-cuts-the-ribbon-for-the-new-miniature-museum/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 17:33:18 +0000 https://logprotect.net/the-minister-cuts-the-ribbon-for-the-new-miniature-museum/ TEHRAN – Cultural Heritage, Tourism and Handicrafts Minister Ezzatollah Zarghami on Thursday inaugurated a new miniature museum in Tabriz, northwestern Iran. The museum exhibited 111 rare works of art belonging to the Tabriz School of Art, CHTN reported on Sunday. Illuminated manuscript folios of the Shahnameh, Ferdowsi’s epic masterpiece, and a few calligraphies, mostly dating […]]]>

TEHRAN – Cultural Heritage, Tourism and Handicrafts Minister Ezzatollah Zarghami on Thursday inaugurated a new miniature museum in Tabriz, northwestern Iran.

The museum exhibited 111 rare works of art belonging to the Tabriz School of Art, CHTN reported on Sunday.

Illuminated manuscript folios of the Shahnameh, Ferdowsi’s epic masterpiece, and a few calligraphies, mostly dating from the Safavid era (1501-1736) are highlights of the museum, according to the report.

The museum, located in the historic Hariri Mansion, also features works by prominent Safavid-era miniaturists such as Sultan Mohammad and Kamaleddin Behzad.

In addition, a temporary exhibition has been installed at the Museum to present the Hariri Mansion, which has been inscribed on the National Heritage List, its architectural features, the restoration process and the Hariri family.

The Tabriz school of miniature painting was founded by the Ilkhanians-Mongols in the early 14th century and active during the first half of the 16th century. According to Britannica, the style represented the first full penetration of East Asian traditions into Islamic painting, an influence that was extreme at first but later blended with the native idiom.

The early works of the Tabriz school were characterized by light, feathery brushstrokes, soft rather than bright Persian coloring, and an attempt to create the illusion of spatiality.

The school of Tabriz reached its peak just as the Ilkhans were defeated by the Timurids (1370-1506), the dynasty of the Turkish conqueror Timur. The school continued to be active during this time, although it was overshadowed by the Shiraz and Heart workshops. However, when the Safavids came to power in the early 16th century, ruler Shah Esmail brought the master of the Heart school, Behzad, to Tabriz, and the school was revived with a drastic change in style.

The figures were individuals rather than types, and the colors were graduated in wonderfully subtle shades. Following the withdrawal of the Safavid court from Tabriz, the school began to decline, and the Qazvin and Isfahan schools then became the centers of painting in Iran.

Steeped in history and culture for millennia, Tabriz includes several historical and religious sites, including the Jameh Mosque of Tabriz and the Arg of Tabriz, and the historic bazaar complex of Tabriz, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, to name a few. The city became the capital of Mongol Il-Khan Mahmud Gazan (1295-1304) and his successor. Timur (Tamerlane), a Turkish conqueror, took it in 1392. A few decades later, the Kara Koyunlu Turkmen made it their capital when the famous Blue Mosque was built in Tabriz.

The city retained its administrative status under the Safavid dynasty until 1548 when Shah Tahmasp I moved his capital west to Qazvin. Over the next two centuries, Tabriz changed hands several times between Persia and the Ottoman Empire. During the First World War, the city was temporarily occupied by Turkish and then Soviet troops.

ABU/AFM

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Launch of an exhibition in Jeddah to support patients with chronic diseases https://logprotect.net/launch-of-an-exhibition-in-jeddah-to-support-patients-with-chronic-diseases/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 20:17:06 +0000 https://logprotect.net/launch-of-an-exhibition-in-jeddah-to-support-patients-with-chronic-diseases/ Jeddah: An exhibition was launched Tuesday in Jeddah to support patients suffering from chronic diseases, showing local products and homemade products at the Jeddah Superdome under the patronage of Princess Adela bint Abdullah. Organized by the National Home Health Care Foundation with the support of the General Entertainment Authority, the 21st edition of “Bisat Al […]]]>

Jeddah: An exhibition was launched Tuesday in Jeddah to support patients suffering from chronic diseases, showing local products and homemade products at the Jeddah Superdome under the patronage of Princess Adela bint Abdullah.

Organized by the National Home Health Care Foundation with the support of the General Entertainment Authority, the 21st edition of “Bisat Al Reeh”, an annual non-profit exhibition, is organized as part of Jeddah’s season activities.

Princess Adela, chairperson of the foundation’s board of directors, told Arab News: “The ‘Bisat Al-Reeh’ exhibition is the main source of income for the foundation which supports needy patients in ten different cities of the Kingdom. . We are very proud to have such a cultural and economic event with all these new and big brands coming together to support our goal.

The last edition saw the participation of more than 180 brands, including local handicrafts such as home accessories, jewelry, elegant decorations, food products and other items inspired by the Kingdom’s heritage.

Princess Adela said: “I always encourage Saudi brands to participate nevertheless, we are very proud that other brands are also participating (and) it gives them a chance to get to know each other… maybe develop business together and learn each other. ”

She added, “I would like to encourage the company to come and visit us. It is a very good cause. It is a humanitarian cause because it takes care of patients with chronic diseases, and it helps different businessmen to show their efforts and know more about what our society needs.

Locally and internationally renowned charities and arts businesses also participate in the exhibition.

(A photo by Huda Bashatah)

One of the highlights of this year’s exhibition is a set of collaborative and multi-faceted sculptures made by a group of artists.

The piece, titled “Ana Juz’a” – which translates to “I am part of” – allowed each of the artists to present their own artistic vision through a three-dimensional model, with each element displayed in a different location. in the exhibition space.

Renad Al-Demh, one of the volunteers at the event, told Arab News, “The artwork is a collaboration with the foundation. The 28 artists are mostly Saudis and Arabs and one is from the United States.

The sculptures presented at the exhibition depict humans, health, culture, beauty and the mottos of life.

Saudi calligrapher Ahmed Jeddawi, who presented his conceptual works at the exhibition, said: “As a calligrapher and a lover of conceptual works, through this art, I wanted to shed light on the concept of health and emptiness. and their significance as a blessing which many people may not recognize.

He added: “I chose to symbolize it by writing and abstracting the letters of the word ‘health’ in Arabic.”


(A photo by Huda Bashatah)

Some of the artwork evoked optimism and joy, some told stories of the Hijazi woman in the past, while others focused on depicting Saudi folk dances such as contemporary cubist paintings of men playing of the flute, which is one of the most widely used wind instruments. in the cities of Hijaz, often performed at festive events.

Each work has a QR code that visitors scan to learn more about the piece.

Abeer Qabbani, exhibition manager and vice president of the foundation, said the proceeds will be used to support the foundation’s programs and activities.

Qabbani added that the funds will be used for different services relating to the medical, emotional, psychological and social well-being of those who suffer from chronic diseases, their families and caregivers.

This year’s ‘Bisat Al-Reeh’ exhibition is open to women only from Tuesday to Friday, with families welcome on Saturday from 4.30pm to midnight daily.

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Why does my handwriting get smaller with age? | Features https://logprotect.net/why-does-my-handwriting-get-smaller-with-age-features/ Sat, 28 May 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/why-does-my-handwriting-get-smaller-with-age-features/ Dear Dr. Roach: As I get older (I’m 88), I’ve noticed that my handwriting is getting smaller and smaller. Sometimes I can’t even read my own notes or those of other elderly friends. Why does this happen? — VVM Answer: “Micrographia” (Greek for “small handwriting”) is the term for this behavior. × This page requires […]]]>

Dear Dr. Roach: As I get older (I’m 88), I’ve noticed that my handwriting is getting smaller and smaller. Sometimes I can’t even read my own notes or those of other elderly friends. Why does this happen? — VVM

Answer: “Micrographia” (Greek for “small handwriting”) is the term for this behavior.

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