Calligraphy pens – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 10:35:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://logprotect.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-29T151759.208-150x150.png Calligraphy pens – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ 32 32 History and facts about handwriting https://logprotect.net/history-and-facts-about-handwriting/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 05:55:26 +0000 https://logprotect.net/history-and-facts-about-handwriting/ National Handwriting Day is celebrated on January 23 every year. National Handwriting Day is created to take pencil or pen and paper to practice and renovate the vintage art of handwriting. Handwriting refers to an individual’s particular style of writing with a writing instrument like a pencil or pen. As the two peoples will not […]]]>

National Handwriting Day is celebrated on January 23 every year. National Handwriting Day is created to take pencil or pen and paper to practice and renovate the vintage art of handwriting.

Handwriting refers to an individual’s particular style of writing with a writing instrument like a pencil or pen.

As the two peoples will not have the same writing style, handwriting is used by foreign experts and professors to test the accuracy of documents.

According to the Writing Instrument Manufacturers Association, National Handwriting Day is an ideal day to re-examine the clarity and strength of handwriting.

History of National Writing Day:

In 1977, the Writing Instrument Manufacturers Association invented National Handwriting Day. Their purpose is to advertise the consumption of pencils, pens and paper.

They choose January 23 as Handwriting Day in memory of the birthday of John Hancock, the first to sign the Declaration of Independence.

Handwriting that is difficult to read due to warping or illegibility of letters is called the worst. According to Time reports, Doctors Handwriting kills nearly 7,000 people a year.

The vintage art of handwriting is nearly obsolete in today’s technological world with spell checkers and the ability to easily change fonts and font sizes.

So it’s a day to look back and reflect on what pencil, pen and paper can do for us.

How to celebrate National Handwriting Day:

Just pick up the pen or pencil and tell a letter to your friend or family members with your elegant writing style. Try to minimize computer use for writing anything.

Instead of using the laptop, carry a notepad and pencil or pen to take notes wherever you go.

You can celebrate the day by learning more about John Hancock and the Declaration of Independence. You can practice making your handwriting legible and neat.

How to observe National Handwriting Day:

Whether you lack practice or execute beautiful handwriting, share a little handwritten message with us. Here are some other ideas to try:

  • Start a journal.
  • Send a handwritten letter to a friend or family member.
  • Write a short story or a poem.
  • Take a calligraphy class.
  • Write a to-do list.
  • Leave a love note to someone dear to you.
  • Compliment someone with a handwritten sticky note.
  • Pay by check if you dare.
  • Leave your server a tip and a handwritten note of thanks for their service.

Noteworthy facts about handwriting:

  • Handwritten notes are more effective: People who write notes by hand tend to be more selective in what they write, focus on the most important concepts, and organize their notes more efficiently.
  • Handwriting keeps the mind sharp: Handwriting involves motor skills and various parts of the brain and memory. Doctors recommend pursuing a hobby that involves handwriting to keep your mind sharp.
  • Handwriting reduces distractions related to: When you write by hand away from the computer, you’re less likely to be distracted by social media, email, or the Internet.
  • Writing it down can help you do that: Studies show that those who write down their goals, especially by hand, are more likely to achieve them. Writing things down can help clarify your goals and hold you accountable.
  • Handwriting is therapeutic: The simple act of handwriting can have a calming and therapeutic effect. Additionally, writing down thoughts and feelings can free up a chaotic mind and help reduce anxiety and stress.
]]>
Can gaming laptops be used for work? – NewsGram https://logprotect.net/can-gaming-laptops-be-used-for-work-newsgram/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 14:10:18 +0000 https://logprotect.net/can-gaming-laptops-be-used-for-work-newsgram/ A laptop computer has gone from a luxury item to an essential utility in today’s world. Laptops make it easier for professionals on the go as more and more of our shifts are done online. Whether you’re attending a conference or traveling to another location, a laptop lets you take your work with you. Advantages […]]]>

A laptop computer has gone from a luxury item to an essential utility in today’s world. Laptops make it easier for professionals on the go as more and more of our shifts are done online. Whether you’re attending a conference or traveling to another location, a laptop lets you take your work with you.

Advantages of gaming laptops:


Gaming laptops are ideal for work because they offer efficient technology that allows them to handle demanding office activities without lags. The main advantage of a gaming laptop is its hardware, including a powerful processor and graphics card. Both of these factors can significantly boost non-gaming activities. A fast processor will boost the performance of every activity. In short, gaming laptops are designed to be fast.

The main advantage of a gaming laptop is its hardware, including a powerful processor and graphics card. | Unsplash

Disadvantages of gaming laptops:

Gaming laptops are much more expensive than regular laptops and usually big and heavy because the hardware used in these laptops is bulkier. Consequently, more heat is generated, which requires adequate ventilation to cool down. They consume a lot of power, and therefore their battery life is low, and you would need to connect a charger almost all the time to use your laptop.

Are gaming laptops good for work/school?

Depending on the type of work you do, the answer will vary. A gaming laptop may not be necessary for standard Microsoft Office tasks such as creating Powerpoint presentations, writing documents in Microsoft Word, and using Excel. Almost all standard laptops are capable of running such applications without any issues. On the other hand, a gaming laptop might be a suitable choice if your job requires you to do graphics-intensive tasks such as video editing, Photoshop, graphic design, or animation.

person holding a silver Acer Chromebook laptop
While a gaming laptop can be handy at work, there are some downsides to using it. | Unsplash

While a gaming laptop can be handy at work, there are some downsides to using it. The biggest downside is that you probably don’t want to risk damaging your expensive gaming laptop. At work, you’ll have to pack and unpack your laptop multiple times, and there’s always a chance you’ll drop it or accidentally spill something on it. I wouldn’t recommend a gaming laptop for school use. I’d settle for a cheaper option, like a laptop that doesn’t have a dedicated graphics card but has a CPU powerful enough for research. The reason is that if your gaming laptop ever fails, you won’t have to spend hundreds of dollars on a replacement.

Another key consideration is that gaming laptops are typically large and bulky, making them impractical to carry around on a day-to-day basis. Regular laptops, which are smaller, lighter and have longer battery life than gaming laptops, are more practical.

man playing on laptop
The majority of gaming laptops are big and heavy, and you’ll probably get tired of lugging them around after a few days of use. | Unsplash

Overall, gaming laptops are a bit overkill for work or school. The majority of gaming laptops are big and heavy, and you’ll probably get tired of lugging them around after a few days of use. Consider compact laptops that can be easily carried in a bag so you can quickly remove them at any time, without worrying about continuously connecting a charger while in use or running out of battery.

For those who have the financial means, don’t care about weight, and think the extra power provided by gaming laptops would benefit their profession and education, a gaming laptop can be considered.

man stacking coins

For those who have the financial means, a gaming laptop can be considered. | Unsplash

Which gaming laptop is best for gaming and work?

Asus ROG Zephyrus G15, Acer Aspire 5, Razer Blade 14, Dell G5 15 and MSI GS66 Sleath are good gaming laptops well suited for work.

Can a gaming laptop be used for office work?

In demanding office jobs like graphic design or editing and development, gaming laptops are a fantastic choice, but if transport convenience and battery life are important to you, go with one. mid-range laptop.

Are gaming laptops suitable for everyday use?

It depends on your usage. If you only game on your laptop, a gaming laptop is ideal for everyday use.

(Keywords: gaming laptops, top 5 gaming laptops, work, office work, school, college, work laptops)

]]>
Scratched on a stone LRB January 27, 2022 https://logprotect.net/scratched-on-a-stone-lrb-january-27-2022/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 12:59:48 +0000 https://logprotect.net/scratched-on-a-stone-lrb-january-27-2022/ Inot​ August 2006 I visited an architect friend called David Martin who lived near the town of Montignac in the Dordogne. He was in the middle of a complicated job of transforming the interior of a nearby castle, which had been acquired by a wealthy Japanese client. One evening he brought out a large, rather […]]]>

InotAugust 2006 I visited an architect friend called David Martin who lived near the town of Montignac in the Dordogne. He was in the middle of a complicated job of transforming the interior of a nearby castle, which had been acquired by a wealthy Japanese client. One evening he brought out a large, rather dirty wooden crate. “I found it hidden in the back of a cupboard in the castle. These are the papers of a local poet who lived there, Jean-Luc Champerret. Have you heard of him?

The crate, when I finally opened it, contained papers, some loose, some bound in bundles, all covered in thick brown dust, as well as a few rusty pens, bits of charcoal, several bundles of letters, three small notebooks including one black, one gray, one blue – and six copies of a volume of poems by Champerret, Songs of the Dordogne, published in 1941 by a small publishing house in Périgueux, Editions du Noir (presumably a reference to Périgord Noir, the region south of Périgueux, which takes its name from the black oaks that grow there). The poems were written in rhymed alexandrines and were based on, or attempted to recreate, peasant songs from the region. The papers were flimsy and some of the sheets turned to dust when you picked them up. What survived included notes and other poems, written in much shorter lines, accompanied by diagrams reminiscent of Chinese calligraphy, and a number of abstract charcoal drawings done on standard blank Post Office postcards. There were also a number of visual poems with words and letters of varying sizes spread sparsely across the page, possibly indebted to Apollinaire, certainly influenced by Mallarmé. A roll of the dice, of which they seemed a late imitation. The gray notebook, the first I opened, was titled “Notes on Lascaux,” and was written in pencil. The first 36 pages were filled with handwriting and diagrams in tiny, impenetrable handwriting. The rest of the notebook was blank.

There was little on Champerret – I found no other trace of Songs of the Dordogne, and the National Library did not hold a copy. He does not appear to have published any other works. My few contacts in university French departments had not heard of him. However, I managed to find his birth certificate via the town hall in Montignac. He was born in the village of Moustier, on the road from Les Eyzies to Montignac, on September 11, 1910, to Alice Rose Champerret and Gaston Yves Champerret. But there was nothing more. David Martin put me in touch with Isabelle Dupois, who had worked as a chambermaid at the chateau where the crate had been found. She told me that Champerret was living in Paris at the start of the war and had, she thought, briefly been a member of a Resistance cell which included a tall, nervous Irishman, before being forced to flee the capital to return in the Dordogne. There, he had gone to live in the castle, requisitioned by the local Resistance. He was a discreet man, who didn’t say much, but she knew he had worked as a decryptor. When Lascaux was discovered by four schoolchildren and their Robot dog on September 12, 1940, Champerret was sent by his cell to inspect the caves, in case they could serve as a hiding place for resistance fighters. Nothing came of it: within days everyone in the region was aware of the discovery of a remarkable new set of cave paintings in the hills south of Montignac. Then in February 1942, the castle was raided by the Gestapo. Champerret escaped, but Dupois knew nothing of his subsequent moves. “Has he ever been married?” I asked him. “No,” she replied emphatically, “he wasn’t the type.

The notebooks, I quickly realized, provided the key to Champerret’s work. During his clandestine excursion to Lascaux, made before archaeologists set foot there, Champerret had not only assessed the potential of the caves for Resistance operations, but had examined the paintings very closely, and in particular the signs and marks. He used his code-breaking skills to examine them, and the notebooks contain the fruit of his ruminations. They are not always easy to decipher and some pages are missing, many are blank and in seemingly crucial places they look like they have been chewed up by rodents. And these are notebooks: the arguments are neither advanced nor advanced systematically.

Champerret seems to suggest that the signs he found in the caves – signs that later generations almost unanimously found uninterpretable – should be read as a form of primitive writing, and in the last pages of the Blue Book offers meanings that should be attached to each sign. . A row of vertical lines could perhaps represent spears, or a forest, or even rain. An upside-down “v” sign (or two such signs, one above the other) can represent mountains or huts. A line of dots can represent people, travel, faces, or stars. A row of horizontal lines can represent mist or night. A sign resembling an upside-down question mark could represent a club; a sign resembling a three-quarter circle with a dot in the middle, an eye; a winding line or a group of lines a river, etc. “The sign”, he remarks at one point, “is never arbitrary”. These signs, he argues, could be linked together to form primitive sentences, or to carry messages if carved on a stone or a piece of bark, or in the earth with a stick. Or they could simply register a transaction between tribes. So, for example, the sign of the mountains in conjunction with the sign of travel might imply that a hunting party had crossed the mountains. A group of signs representing antlers could record the goods handed over in an exchange.

Champerret draws attention to the three-by-three square grilles that are frequently found on the walls of the cave, notably in the polychrome coat of arms under the Black Cow in the nave of Lascaux. Take a leap in the dark – and isn’t that what the leaping horses that line the ceiling of the axial gallery of Lascaux ask of us? – Champerret proposes that these grids serve as frameworks for the insertion of signs. Just as the signs of mountain and travel, put in conjunction, acquire meanings, so a grid filled with signs and engraved on a stone could carry a message. When the grid is filled with forest signs and fire signs, for example, it can be a warning that the forest is going to burn. But Champerret goes further, proposing that although the grids may originally have been used for practical purposes, they evolved to form the basis of early written poetry. It’s an amazing proposition.

Just as Wittgenstein argues that one does not learn a game by reading a rulebook but by playing it, Champerret seems to have believed that practice would prove or disprove the validity of his idea, and so he began to write poetry. using these signs and grids. It is unclear whether he decided the possible meanings for the individual signs in advance, or whether the compositional process suggested these meanings, but the latter seems more likely. The notes attached to each sign seem to have been completed and developed as he worked on the poems.

Starting from the postulate that nine signs extracted from the network of caves and inserted into the grid three by three would make a poem, Champerret wrote (if one includes its variants) more than six hundred of them. His method breaks down into five steps: a) he fills in the grid with signs; b) he minimally “translates” the signs into French; c) he writes through the first translation, adding connecting words, to make the poem easier to read in modern French, translating the three-by-three structure of the grid into three stanzas of three lines each; d) he writes a first variation on the poem, elaborating certain lines and embellishing the detail, as a shaman or an oral poet might vary the bare outline of an inherited story; e) it repeats this process, continuing to elaborate and embellish the original, while retaining the stanza pattern, although the lines are gradually indented to echo the original three-by-three structure as it is spread laterally and vertically on the page.

Here is one of these poems, in its translated variants:

a)

b)

sun buffalo eye
bison horns spears
paw bison club

vs)

The eye
bison
is the sun

the horns
bison
are spears

legs
bison
are clubs

D)

The eye
bison
is like the bright sun

the horns
bison
are like sharp spears

legs
bison
are like heavy clubs

e)

The white eye
black buffalo
is like a star at night

curved horns
black buffalo
are like sharp spears

thick legs
black buffalo
are like heavy clubs

Champerret continues his explorations in his Blue Notebook, experimenting with other grids found at Lascaux: simple squares, for a single sign; squares separated by a vertical line, where two signs could be inserted; squares divided by two vertical lines and a horizontal line, where six signs could be inserted; and grids four by four, accommodating sixteen signs. With these grids, Champerret was able to write short poems, stemming from a single sign, as well as longer stories.

One of the crate letters suggests that he wrote a document, now lost, explaining his work. The letter is from the director of the Musée de l’Homme, Paul Rivet, and is dated June 1941.

Dear Sir,

Thank you for your essay on the Lascaux caves and the mysterious signs found there. We have received a great deal of correspondence concerning Lascaux since its discovery in September 1940, and unfortunately it is not possible to respond in detail to every request. The study of the parietal art of the Upper Paleolithic is a science, and must be left in the hands of specialists, because the interference of amateurs can only damage this sacred national heritage in the long term. Your work is pure fantasy. The signs you describe bear no resemblance to those discovered at Lascaux, and meticulously recorded in tracings and documented in detail by Abbé Breuil, as indicated in his report presented to the Académie des Inscriptions et des Belles Lettres in October 1940.

I sincerely advise you not to pursue your speculations, and advise you in this moment of national turpitude to direct your considerable energies elsewhere.

Rivet’s belief that there were discrepancies between Champerret’s collection of signs and that of Lascaux is not unfounded, but his dismissal is hasty. He had something else in mind: in June 1941, he worked to set up a Resistance network operating from the Musée de l’Homme. Indeed, in his letter he clearly urges Champerret to get involved in the Resistance himself, ignoring the mission that had brought the poet to the caves in the first place.

]]>
Improving Calligraphy Skills https://logprotect.net/improving-calligraphy-skills/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 09:38:02 +0000 https://logprotect.net/improving-calligraphy-skills/ 1 / 1 Improving Calligraphy Skills Are you one of those people who get excited about the various strokes, flourishes, and beautiful letterforms and look forward to doing calligraphy every day? We have something special in store for you.Calligraphy is a great hobby to pursue, and we’re going to show you five simple techniques to […]]]>

1 / 1
Improving Calligraphy Skills

Are you one of those people who get excited about the various strokes, flourishes, and beautiful letterforms and look forward to doing calligraphy every day? We have something special in store for you.
Calligraphy is a great hobby to pursue, and we’re going to show you five simple techniques to improve your calligraphy skills today. You can easily put them into practice, and they will definitely help you on your calligraphic journey, says Pooja Bhagwat, founder of Ink n Bliss, Calligraphy & Design studio. Let the party begin!

Know your tools
There are many types of calligraphy to choose from, and you may be using pens that don’t suit your writing style. With so many different types of calligraphy tools on the market, it’s easy to get confused and start using the wrong ones.
To understand the different tools and their functions, it is necessary to acquire sufficient knowledge or learn from qualified calligraphy tutors. This is a very important point. It is essential to understand and use high quality supplies in order to have a positive writing experience. By selecting the right equipment, you can start your calligraphy journey with ease and generate the best results right away.

Master the basic strokes
Oh no! I cannot stress enough the importance of practicing the basic strokes. The most common mistake made by beginners is to compose words without having learned the basics first.
Any script, any style of calligraphy, is made up of an ordered set of rules and basic shapes. Writing words and sentences becomes much easier if you memorize and master them. Keep in mind that mastering calligraphy starts with mastering your basic strokes. You will see significant improvements in your calligraphy if you dedicate a few minutes each day to practicing the basic strokes.

Conscious practice
You may already know that practicing calligraphy daily will improve your skills. But it’s useless if you don’t practice consciously. It’s a waste of precious time, paper and ink if you don’t know what you’re doing.
I constantly advise my students that while practicing, they should have a goal in mind. You might want to focus on ovals one day, up and down curls the next, or you might want to dedicate an entire week to improving your compound curve. It’s entirely up to you.
You will progress faster if you set a specific goal and then work towards it. Of course, not every line or stroke will be perfect, but with focused attention and patience, you will see significant improvement in your handwriting. Your workouts will be more enjoyable than frustrating. So set aside time for mindful practice and savor every moment.

To slow down
It takes time to learn calligraphy! I know Instagram is full of great calligraphy videos, and you might think calligraphy is quick and easy. However, due to time constraints with the release, the majority of these films were sped up.
Slowing down can help you focus more on your shots, angles, spacing, and links instead of looking haphazard. You’ll enjoy writing more since you’ll be able to see and feel your breath rise and fall with each stroke. It’s quite meditative. Slowing down your writing will help you achieve greater accuracy.

Learn from your progress
Many novice and even seasoned calligraphers constantly compare their work to that of others. It goes without saying, but everyone comes from a unique background, has a unique attitude, and has a unique set of skills. Therefore, this type of comparison will not help you improve your expertise. In fact, such a comparison will make you feel uncomfortable or lose your confidence. Setting unreasonable goals will prevent you from achieving them.
Comparing your new job to your previous job is really helpful if you really want to grow and see positive results in your writing. It boosts your self-esteem and instantly improves your mood. You might make new discoveries, such as your wobbly lines no longer shaking, your ovals becoming more uniform, your angles improving, and so on. Seeing your personal improvement on a regular basis will increase your happiness and satisfaction.

]]>
For the love of books – Barriere Star Journal https://logprotect.net/for-the-love-of-books-barriere-star-journal/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/for-the-love-of-books-barriere-star-journal/ Edith felt useless when she was fired. “I don’t have any skills except for entry-level jobs,” she whined to her friend Jan. “What am I going to do?” “Start your job search and maybe do some volunteer work.” “Are you kidding? I can’t work for nothing, Jan! “I understand,” her arm slung around her friend’s […]]]>

Edith felt useless when she was fired. “I don’t have any skills except for entry-level jobs,” she whined to her friend Jan. “What am I going to do?”

“Start your job search and maybe do some volunteer work.”

“Are you kidding? I can’t work for nothing, Jan!

“I understand,” her arm slung around her friend’s shoulders. “What if you found something you love to do but never had time to do? Community service in the interim between jobs is rewarding. Wouldn’t it do you good not to earn salary ? “

“It is possible, since you say so. But who buys my gasoline? »

“I have an idea. Thomson River Elementary School is near you; let’s go and see if they might need any help.

“Hey, I’m not a teacher!” What would I do in a school?

“We will only know if we ask. And tomorrow before lunch? Edith was exasperated by Jan’s enthusiasm but agreed.

“Let’s find you a new hobby,” Jan blurted out when she showed up the next day.

“Ugh, drop your soap box, Jan!” I only have an hour; I promised to finish some posters for a religious event.

“So…you make posters?” »

“Yeah, they’re pretty simple: print some info, draw a little sketch, highlight with lots of color, and voila, you’ve got an attention grabber. It’s nothing, but I said I would.

At school, they introduced themselves to the secretary who took them to meet the librarian. Ms. Mae looked harassed. “We just got a truckload of books, and I have people putting up shelves, a few parents and retirees painting the walls, cataloging the shipment and helping me with the card systems. I’m sorry, but I have all the help I need.

On the way home, Edith chuckled in satisfaction. “Well, that was a dead end. Do you have any other great ideas, Jan?”

Writhing her mouth, Jan simply nodded… then, as if a light bulb had gone on, she stopped short. “Hey, we just need to go home for a minute.”

“And now?” Edith was lagging behind. What else could she want to ask?

Amidst the chaos, Ms. Mae looked up, “You’re back.”

“Yeah, uh, would you consider Edith creating posters advertising those new books you have?” These freshly painted walls are beautiful but they are quite bare.

“Woe,” nudged Edith. “Just wait a minute! »

“Don’t interrupt me, Edith. I saw your sketches; I am a person to whom you did not hide your creative side!

Ms. Mae raised her eyebrows with interest as Jan shared, “If the school can provide supplies such as colored markers, India ink and poster board, Edith has the time and talent to create posters !” Turning to her friend, she asked, “How are you, Edith?” They stared at each other.

Ms. Mae did not hesitate and accepted the proposal. Jan’s heart pounded with nervous excitement. Just two weeks later, a reporter with a passion for human interest stories answered a call from the school to interview those involved in the project to raise awareness of their ‘Raise a Reader’ campaign.

After the interview, Ms. Mae and a student ceremonially cut the luminous ribbon with her phrase, “For the love of books.” As they ruminated around the booths and attractive displays, parents, teachers and children admired the multi-dimensional posters identifying, in clever calligraphy, the titles of new books. Eyes widened at the creative depictions – caricatures, animals, fantasy scenes and story themes illustrated by Edith.

The community was abuzz about the campaign and the library’s new facelift when the full-page layout, complete with photos, appeared in a special edition of the newspaper. In a long column, Edith, Jan and dozens of others like them, who have given many hours to the campaign as volunteers, were announced.

Quoted in the article was Ms. Mae’s deep gratitude. “We could not have offered these services to our children without our wonderful volunteers! Thank you all for your generosity! You have made it a great learning environment to “raise a reader” for our young people! »

After the formalities, the eager children hugged bundles of books and gathered excitedly at the checkout tables.

~ By Rita Joan Dozlaw

_______________

news@starjournal.net

Like us on Facebook

]]>
Montblanc Meisterstück Calligraphy In Burgundy https://logprotect.net/montblanc-meisterstuck-calligraphy-in-burgundy/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/montblanc-meisterstuck-calligraphy-in-burgundy/ From the Montblanc Meisterstück Great Masters Calligraphy collection. Mont Blanc Calligraphy is becoming more popular day by day, it seems, with professional lettering artists and novice calligraphers showing off their skills whenever possible. And younger kids, like young adults and teens, are joining the trend as they discover calligraphy nibs and colorful inks to exercise […]]]>

Calligraphy is becoming more popular day by day, it seems, with professional lettering artists and novice calligraphers showing off their skills whenever possible. And younger kids, like young adults and teens, are joining the trend as they discover calligraphy nibs and colorful inks to exercise their creativity.

But this seemingly new art form actually has its roots in the distant past. Brush calligraphy dates back to ancient China and the Shang dynasty, eventually moving throughout Asia and ancient Greece. In fact, the word itself comes from the Greek: “beauty” (kallos) and “to write” (graphein).

Adding luxury to the theme, Montblanc, which has championed the word handwritten since its inception in 1906, presents the Meisterstück Calligraphy Solitaire Burgundy, part in response and part in encouragement from, beautiful writing.

Tendency

Many agree that this increase in interest in calligraphy may be due to the fact that we have more time to indulge in such interests, which may have been on the back burner for years. And interesting – to me, at least – is the simultaneous rise of fascination with journals, which obviously serve as the canvas for all this whimsical writing.

Chris Sullivan, President of Fahrney’s Think Washington, DC, says, “We’ve seen a lot more journals go out the door [this year].” And it seems to me that many brands are responding to the growing demand, offering high-quality examples in a variety of price ranges, styles, and cover options.

Meisterstück Old Masters Calligraphy Collection

Montblanc Meisterstück Grand Master Calligraphy Collection focuses on more flexible nibs that allow for expressive calligraphic writing governed by the amount of pressure exerted on the nib. In this way, a variation in the width and character of the lines is achieved, often with astonishing results.

These nibs are inspired by Montblanc pens from the 1950s and are hand-sculpted in 18-karat gold by master craftsmen who participate in the 35 steps necessary to manufacture them. The flexible nib is engraved with the calligraphy symbol “888”.

From now on, the flexible tip makes its debut on this Meisterstück Calligraphie Solitaire Laque de Bourgogne model. And in a dramatic nod to the tradition of calligraphy in Japanese art and culture, the writing instrument is dressed in red, one of the most symbolic colors in Japanese culture.

Combining heritage and contemporary styling, the body of the pen features a modern ombre decor, achieved by using a new gradient lacquer technique applied to brushed metal. The translucent burgundy lacquer is complemented by champagne gold fittings and a flexible nib coated in 18k champagne gold.

The Meisterstück Calligraphy Solitaire Burgundy Lacquer is also available as a fountain pen with a standard tip, as well as a rollerball pen.

More Montblanc Flex

Last year, Montblanc launched the Meisterstück Maki-e Calligraphy Tribute to Kyoto Fine Craftsmanship Limited Edition 88 with urushi lacquer and maki-e at its best. Its design highlights the traditional Maiko, an apprentice geisha in Kyoto, dressed in a colorful kimono.

Montblanc has also developed a curved tip for this model, with a tip that features a 45° angle, allowing lines of different thicknesses to be created at different angles: from thin vertical lines to broad horizontal strokes.

]]>
Master the art of reading medieval manuscripts https://logprotect.net/master-the-art-of-reading-medieval-manuscripts/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 17:41:42 +0000 https://logprotect.net/master-the-art-of-reading-medieval-manuscripts/ Throughout the fall a group of students gathered at Dartmouth Library Rauner’s Special Collections Library to decipher handwritten texts from the Middle Ages. The course – “Latin palaeography”, co-taught by jennifer lynn, director of the language program at Classics Department, and medievalist Cecilia Gaposhkin, professor and president of the Department of History—Was a unique opportunity […]]]>

Throughout the fall a group of students gathered at Dartmouth Library Rauner’s Special Collections Library to decipher handwritten texts from the Middle Ages.

The course – “Latin palaeography”, co-taught by jennifer lynn, director of the language program at Classics Department, and medievalist Cecilia Gaposhkin, professor and president of the Department of History—Was a unique opportunity for undergraduates interested in Latin, medieval studies and the history of books.

Paleography – the study of historical manuscripts and handwriting – is typically not taught at the undergraduate level, Gaposchkin explains.

“It’s amazing that we have 10 students who want to learn this,” she says. “They do university-level work. “

Textspeak for the Middle Ages

Before printing, European scribes wrote and copied pen and ink manuscripts in Latin. Today, making sense of these works requires knowledge of everything from calligraphic styles to idiomatic Latin expressions and abbreviations – think the texts speak of the Middle Ages.

“It’s literally the same thing,” says Kamil Salame ’24, a member of the School House residential community in Greenwich, Connecticut, comparing abbreviations used by medieval writers to modern short forms, such as LOL or OMG.

In handwritten abbreviation, “DNO means domino (lord), DS is deus (god), ”says Salame, who is considering a modified government major. “A you with a line on it equals letters uh– they just didn’t want to insert the last character at the end, as we would write “tho” instead of “though”. ”

“It’s like solving a puzzle,” says Elizabeth Hadley ’23, a member of School House in North Caldwell, NJ, who calls the class “one of the best experiences I have had in Dartmouth. ”

A graduate of the premedical classics, Hadley says it’s “fun to put the pieces together to figure out words.” And then just see the manuscripts themselves. These are artifacts you never thought you could see.

Paleography is an essential part of classical and medieval scholarship, says Lynn. “Even if you read classic texts that come in a printed book – Cicero or Virgil, let’s say – an editor looked at all the manuscripts we have and had to decide which one was the right one. You should be able to assess the editor’s work, even if most of your reading is from books.

Manuscripts can help reveal details about the specific era and culture in which they were written, Gaposchkin says. “Every scholar worth his salt invariably ends up having to contend with the material dossier upon which our knowledge rests. Often the only way to date and place evidence is in writing. It is a basic technical skill to carry out provenance work.

Hands-on learning

In a typical session, students gather in Rauner’s Ticknor Room with an open manuscript on a table, the page under discussion projected onto a screen, and a library cart with reference books nearby. Students have transcribed and translated the text in advance, and they go around the circle sharing interpretations. The teachers intervene with elements of historical and linguistic context.

IIt’s a fundamentally collaborative discipline, ”says Salame. “You need several pairs of eyes on a manuscript so that someone can see something that you may not be able to see at the moment. “

Students learn about manuscript conservation from Dartmouth Library Collections Curator Deborah Howe; the codicology, or the study of books as physical objects, by Special Collections Librarian Morgan Swan; and visit the Book art workshop, where program manager Sarah Smith shows them how to make oak gall ink and quill pens and allows them to practice writing their own Gothic calligraphy.

“It’s difficult, but fun to put yourself in the place of the scribe, the person who writes what we read for homework,” says Hadley.

For their final projects, students document fragments of manuscripts from Rauner’s collection, artefacts that no one may have examined closely for hundreds of years.

“I’m looking at an eleventh-century martyrology on Saints Palatias and Laurentia,” says Salame. “This is a fragment of a folio that was torn from its original manuscript and reused as part of a binding for another manuscript. There are scribe’s notes in the margins and overlaid text from another hand from a later period. On some edges the text is cut off and I have to find out what the words are.

“Rauner has a lot of fragments that have very minimal metadata,” Gaposchkin explains. “Students basically have to do the work of a librarian or historian.”

]]>
7 creative hobbies to try in 2022 https://logprotect.net/7-creative-hobbies-to-try-in-2022/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 14:28:16 +0000 https://logprotect.net/7-creative-hobbies-to-try-in-2022/ Has anyone else ever felt that sudden urge to take charge of their life in the middle of the night? The first two weeks of a New Year feel like this. There is renewed enthusiasm in the air and the Josh is “high sir! Now is the perfect time to set your goals for the […]]]>

Has anyone else ever felt that sudden urge to take charge of their life in the middle of the night? The first two weeks of a New Year feel like this. There is renewed enthusiasm in the air and the Josh is “high sir! Now is the perfect time to set your goals for the coming months and start new beginnings. Take a break from doomscrolling and invest your energies in learning a new skill. Here are some fun and more creative hobbies to dip your toes into in 2022:

Longboard

A longboard, as the name suggests, is longer than a traditional skateboard (it is usually between 30 and 33 inches). Longboards range from 33 inches to 60 inches. Skateboards are more associated with tricks while longboards are intended for cruising. The longer and wider base makes it easier to maintain balance, especially for beginners. And of course, the added benefit of adding it to your creative hobbies list is that you can browse, while people must love… walking.

Flow arts

A therapeutic means of self-expression, the flow arts consist of a variety of movement-based disciplines such as poi and stick rotation, hula hooping, contact juggling and other forms of movement manipulation. objects. Described as a meditation in motion, practicing an art of flow can help you achieve present moment awareness known as the “state of flow.” Creative hobbies with the added benefit of sanity tick all the boxes for me.

Learn a new musical instrument

From guitar and ukelele to drums and bongos, there are a variety of options to choose from. We recommend you to try the kalimba which is a modern version of the ancient African mbira instrument and is easy to learn. It consists of a wooden soundboard and attached metal tines that are plucked to produce a soothing sound.

Floral composition

Relaxing and rewarding, the practice of floral art is a great way to express yourself creatively. Start by learning the basics of flowers and understanding the techniques for cutting, conditioning and preserving them. You can make flower arrangements for everything from decorating your home to gift bouquets. It’s one of those creative hobbies that I see myself becoming a business.

Hand lettering

Merging calligraphy with more modern fonts, hand lettering is a calming craft that uses brush-tipped pens and markers instead of sharp nibs. It’s about controlling the pressure to create lines. Incredibly calming and easy enough to learn, it lets you explore and develop your own style with just a little practice.

Needlework

creative hobbies

With durability and upcycling becoming the way forward, needlework is a wonderful hobby to explore. Crochet, knitting, embroidery and more are not only fun ways to produce something unique and useful, but are also great stress relievers. And hey, another one of those creative hobbies where you can make something beautiful.

Building terrariums

creative hobbies

Want to try gardening but not ready to commit? Try to build a terrarium. Terrariums are miniature gardens inside sealable containers like jars and bottles that are generally self-contained with very little care on your part. This is a great DIY project for plant lovers.



Source link

]]>
My Father’s Handwriting | Story https://logprotect.net/my-fathers-handwriting-story/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 09:52:48 +0000 https://logprotect.net/my-fathers-handwriting-story/ My father wrote beautiful elegant lines with care and patience. His Parker ink pen was a treasure he stored like nothing else he owned. When he opened that case and replaced the empty ink cartridge with a full one, it was a ritual to see. He handled this pen with collector’s grace. Once he touched […]]]>

My father wrote beautiful elegant lines with care and patience. His Parker ink pen was a treasure he stored like nothing else he owned. When he opened that case and replaced the empty ink cartridge with a full one, it was a ritual to see. He handled this pen with collector’s grace. Once he touched his little notebook, he wrote and wrote in Arabic and French with wonderful movement as if every letter had to be composed with delicacy, every word strummed like a musical chord. His writing had the finesse of calligraphy with lines drawn in intimate harmonious lines. As a child, I was fascinated by the sound of his pen as it landed on the page and the sight of his hand as it moved in a peaceful chorus with its thoughts.

My father was not a writer. He just liked to write with his ink pen. I never asked what he wrote or why he was so determined to write. I vaguely glimpsed his notebooks once and realized that his words were notes on readings, occasional reflections, perhaps attempts at journaling a life marked by failed dreams and interrupted by the long and long. terrible pain of illness. I’ll never know. My father passed away over 30 years ago and my family lost their notebooks. All I remember is his handwriting and the mystery of the words that I didn’t care enough about at the time of reading.

I was 10 years old when my dad found out he had oral cancer. Doctors in Morocco and France didn’t think he could live beyond a few months, but he defied a monstrous disease for 10 years. Brutal treatment never cured him. It barely eased his suffering as his energy dwindled and half of his face froze and hardened, leaving him horribly and visibly scarred for years. It was hard not to notice how this ruthless disease had ravaged her body. Frequent hospitalizations, severe fatigue and progressive loss of sight exhaust him. Heads turned in the streets and looks of terror and pity must have weighed heavily on him. I remember him frail but with a relentless determination to live on. He read and wrote during long periods of pain and even when one of his eyes let go, his will never faded.

I know he would have told me more about his writings and what it meant to him had it not been for the overwhelming interference of his illness. Maybe he wrote to escape bitter existence after his diagnosis. I wonder if he wanted to impart some wisdom to his children that he was too eloquent to deliver in person. Maybe he searched for words to break the monotony of his life as a government employee. Or maybe drawing letters on a page offered a calming meditation that he couldn’t find anywhere else. I’ll never know.

My memory of my father is loaded with vivid clues, however. Clues from a man of letters who studied philosophy at university before he, the eldest son, was forced to give up after his father’s death to support his family. His own account of this period was often marked with a tinge of remorse, an unfulfilled and lost passion for filial duty. The library in his house bore witness to a dream canceled too soon. Beautiful blue volumes of Islamic exegesis in Arabic have been carefully arranged alongside the French books of Descartes, Nietzsche, Rousseau, Zola, Hugo, Maupassant.

I did not ask why these authors, why this series of books, if there was a harmony in this collection, but I understood later that, in addition to his lessons at the Koranic school, the education of my father in the 1930s and 1940s in Morocco was in the hands of French guardians during colonization. He often spoke of a stern tutor who insisted everyone repeat the deceptive colonial slogan, “France is my new homeland” (France is my new homeland) at the start of each lesson and of the tutor who called them “little ones”. natives ”(small natives) and gave them French names. As a child, my father’s education was in the service of the empire, an indoctrination force disguised as a benevolent endowment. “When the French colonize you,” he told us, “they colonize your mind. That’s it. A heavy load of meaning in the briefest of statements. I had to read for myself much later to catch the dissonance my father must have felt between the corporal punishment of the Koranic school and the deceptive cordiality of modern colonial education. Apprenticeship was either an imposition or a misleading proposition.

But despite the sinister imperial calculation, my father still had a real infatuation with French philosophy and literature. He spoke perfect French with an elegant accent, a deliberate sign perhaps of a reverse appropriation of the colonial language. As the Algerian writer Kateb Yacine would say, we kept French as “spoils of war”, even if it contained words of our own subjugation. Perhaps that was the reason why my father sought to embellish French words with the soft touches of calligraphy. His memory of a dehumanizing schooling was to be appeased by the soft nib of his ink pen. This is how he finds, in the most humble way, a voice tamed from an early age by the violent transactions of the colonial school.

Whether he was stunted by his illness or intimidated by the darkness of colonial memory, my father spoke little of himself, his past, or his dreams. Sometimes his silence was resigned because he was just exhausted, but in hindsight his speech was held back because like most people of his time, he didn’t want his children to be burdened with a painful story and humiliation. Not everyone is fortunate enough to have the talent and serenity to resonate with the past and make it meaningful to themselves and to others. My father was not one of them. Her stories did not have life-changing wisdom, nor did they contain clues as to how I should “know myself.” Perhaps her writings hid a talent or regrets about not having the ease of language or the physical strength to be that guiding voice for her children. I’ll never know.

[Richard Smith/Al Jazeera]

Looking back, I wanted to be able to say like Jorge Luis Borges that I was more educated by my father’s library, that the books on its shelves and his cherished writings planted a seed in me. I don’t know why my father wanted to be a philosopher, why he read Descartes and Hegel, why he continued to read the Koran and its interpretation. I was too young and distracted to ask him these heavy questions, but perhaps something deep was tormenting him. Perhaps an obsession with finding harmony between one’s deep faith and the intrigue of philosophical doubt. I wanted to be able to say that I am fulfilling my father’s dream of becoming an educator and scholar, that his discreet love of reading and writing was the source of my early awakening, or that I am now giving voice to his quiet existence. . And maybe it’s all true. I’m an extension of my father’s fractured fate and it’s beautiful to feel, even momentarily, that the dream of his life hasn’t been stifled after all.

But I have no way to certify this connection. If there was ever a thwarted aspiration of a writer or a scholar with my father, he was able to hide it well. I searched frantically through his rare belongings, traces of him now living in a drab garage, for his notebooks in the hopes of locating a clue or finding a note hidden in one of his books, but my insistence only revealed frustration and anger. The things I cherish most in my father’s memory are gone forever and only my imagination can save that side of him from oblivion. His writing weighs on me like a whisper, a hollow memory that drips in subtle but painful lines.

Perhaps that is why writing as an Arab, as a Muslim, does not come easily or serenely to me. My words land on the page like a confrontation, a devastation, an elegy, a spectacle confronting another spectacle of my identity, my history and my culture. Contrary to the serenity I imagine in my father’s writing, mine feels prompted, assigned, a sort of summons fabricated by the anguish of leaving too many insults unanswered, too much fanaticism unexposed. “I build my language with stones,” said the Martinican poet Édouard Glissant. I build mine as stones are thrown at me, and wonder why some can write without provocation while others see their writing doomed to perpetual response, a painful call to accomplish pain and assess. the damage. I want to reclaim the forbidden tranquility of my writing from the ugliness of the task that still awaits the junior writer. I don’t want my quill to become a sword, its ink to serve a vulgar purpose. My tongue wasn’t supposed to look like a hemorrhage meant to be stopped, lest it cause too much damage to be repaired. My words weren’t meant to be thrown like darts into a world of instant enmity. I don’t back down from a fair fight and believe in the gift of a wild tongue and a mighty pen, but I don’t want my writing to always be a clamor, an armor, a lament in the face of distress and pain. ‘insult. I long for my feather to meet the balance of my father’s feather.

I have to believe that it is to the inaudible beauty of my father’s handwriting that I cling to, a wordless poem that I strive to remember in order to free my own handwriting and save myself from the injunction to plead, defend and response violence imposed. On the day he died, my father’s sight returned for a few minutes just to see us once more. It was a wonderful moment of fleeting joy before unspeakable sorrow, but I remember it now in the same way that I can still imagine those tender lines of his handwriting. My father’s notebooks were full, and maybe that’s a pretty good memory to live with. His words were not for a reader, an editor, but for himself. He wrote and wrote, as Gloria Anzaldúa urged us to do, not to let the ink coagulate in our quills. “Write with your eyes like painters,” she said, “with your ears like musicians, with your feet like dancers, You are the truthful with pen and torch. I may never know what my dad wrote or if he wanted his handwriting to be a torch for anyone, but he left me the biggest lesson of all. Never give up your pen to write for someone else.


Source link

]]>
Luxury Pen Market Growth Analysis, Share, Demand by Regions, Varieties and Key Players Analysis – Analysis Forecast till 2026 – Industrial IT https://logprotect.net/luxury-pen-market-growth-analysis-share-demand-by-regions-varieties-and-key-players-analysis-analysis-forecast-till-2026-industrial-it/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:30:19 +0000 https://logprotect.net/luxury-pen-market-growth-analysis-share-demand-by-regions-varieties-and-key-players-analysis-analysis-forecast-till-2026-industrial-it/ “Global Luxury Pens Market Research Report 2021”This research report provides Covid-19 epidemic Accumulated study to offer the latest insight into the acute characteristics of the luxury pens market. This intelligence report includes investigations based on Current scenarios, historical records and future forecasts. The report contains various market forecasts related to the market size, revenue, production, […]]]>

“Global Luxury Pens Market Research Report 2021”This research report provides Covid-19 epidemic Accumulated study to offer the latest insight into the acute characteristics of the luxury pens market. This intelligence report includes investigations based on Current scenarios, historical records and future forecasts. The report contains various market forecasts related to the market size, revenue, production, CAGR, consumption, gross margin, charts, graphs, pie charts, price, and other important factors. While emphasizing on the major driving and restraining forces in this market, the report also offers a comprehensive study of future trends and developments in the market. It also examines the role of major market players involved in the industry, including their company overview, financial summary and SWOT analysis. It presents the 360 degree overview of the competitive landscape of industries. The luxury pen market is stable growth and TCCA should improve over the forecast period.

The major players in the global luxury covered pens market are:
Elmo & Montegrappa
Josef lamy
Newell brands
Montblanc International
T. Cross Company
Franklin-Christop
Dawn
ST Dupont
Grayson Tighe
Pelikan Group

On the basis of types, the luxury pens market from 2015 to 2025 is majorly divided into:
Pen
Converter pens
Pens
Roller ball pens
Fine Liner Pens
Styluses
Multifunction pens
Brush Pens
Die Pens

On the basis of applications, the luxury pen market from 2015 to 2025 covers:
Calligraphy
Screen writing
Document marking

The Global Luxury Pens Market Report Provides You With In-Depth Information ideas, industry knowledge, market forecasts and analyzes. The report on global luxury pens industry also clarifies economic risks and environmental compliance. Global Luxury Pen Market report helps industry enthusiasts, including investors and policymakers, to make capital investments with confidence, develop strategies, optimize their portfolio of activities, innovate successfully and operate in a safe and durable manner.

Luxury Pen Market: Regional Analysis Includes:

  • Asia Pacific (Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia and Australia)
  • Europe (Turkey, Germany, Russia UK, Italy, France, etc.)
  • North America (United States, Mexico and Canada.)
  • South America (Brazil etc …)
  • The Middle East and Africa (GCC countries and Egypt.)

Main points covered by the table of contents:

  • Overview: Besides an overview of the global Luxury Pen market, this section provides an overview of the report to give an idea of ​​the nature and content of the study.
  • Analysis of the strategies of the main players: Market players can use this analysis to gain competitive advantage over their competitors in the luxury pen market.
  • Study on the main market trends: This section of the report offers a more in-depth analysis of recent and future market trends.
  • Market Forecast: Buyers of the report will have access to accurate and validated estimates of the total market size in terms of value and volume. The report also provides consumption, production, sales, and other forecasts for the Luxury Pen market.
  • Analysis of regional growth: All major regions and countries have been covered in the Luxury Pens Market report. The regional analysis will help market players to tap unexplored regional markets, prepare specific strategies for target regions, and compare the growth of all regional markets.
  • Analysis of segments: The report provides accurate and reliable market share forecast for important segments of the Luxury Pen market. Market players can use this analysis to make strategic investments in key growth pockets of the Luxury Pen market.

The key questions the report answers:

  • What will the market size and growth rate be in 2025?
  • What are the key factors driving the global luxury pens market?
  • What are the key market trends impacting the growth of the Global Luxury Pen Market?
  • What are the challenges of market growth?
  • Who are the major suppliers in the global luxury pen market?
  • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the global Luxury Pen market?
  • Trend factors influencing the market shares of the Americas, APAC, Europe and MEA.
  • What are the key findings of the five forces analysis of the global luxury pens market?

{A free data report (in Excel spreadsheet form) will also be provided upon request with a new purchase.

Contact us:

Web: www.qurateresearch.com
E-mail:[email protected]
Phone: United States – +13393375221

Follow us @

LinkedIn

Twitter

Note: In order to provide a more accurate market forecast, all of our reports will be updated prior to delivery taking into account the impact of COVID-19.



Source link

]]>