Calligraphy pens – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 15:30:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://logprotect.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-29T151759.208-150x150.png Calligraphy pens – Log Protect http://logprotect.net/ 32 32 Turn your writing into art with a great calligraphy set https://logprotect.net/turn-your-writing-into-art-with-a-great-calligraphy-set/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 15:30:03 +0000 https://logprotect.net/turn-your-writing-into-art-with-a-great-calligraphy-set/ Imagine a dozen people hunched over paper, each doing both the same thing as the others and doing something completely different. This is “A brush with silence”, a live exhibition created by artist and calligrapher Brody Neuenschwander, which brings together calligraphers who write in a range of languages ​​and scripts. Participants can observe the many […]]]>

Imagine a dozen people hunched over paper, each doing both the same thing as the others and doing something completely different. This is “A brush with silence”, a live exhibition created by artist and calligrapher Brody Neuenschwander, which brings together calligraphers who write in a range of languages ​​and scripts. Participants can observe the many nuances between Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Cyrillic, Western and other calligraphic scripts. One of the oldest forms of visual art in history, calligraphy is an encompassing term that covers not only cultures, each with their own necessary tools, but also history. While Western calligraphy traditionally uses flat, flexible tip pens to create scripts, Eastern calligraphy tends towards brushwork, and Arabic calligraphy often uses a hollow reed pen. Today, both chisel tip and brush tip markers can be used for colored calligraphy. For the best calligraphic pen sets to achieve a range of styles, explore the following options.

Brought to you by the world’s oldest and most widely circulated art magazine, ARTnews Recommends helps you choose the best choice for you from products in hundreds of art and craft supply categories. Our offerings are based on intensive research, interviews with artists and artisans, and the accumulated experience of the site’s editors and writers. We provide reliable and helpful advice on materials for artists ranging from beginner to professional.

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1. Complete Speedball Calligraphy Kit

Speedball offers a number of western calligraphy sets to suit different needs, but this one is the most versatile (note though that it’s best for right-handed people). In addition to the standard pen barrel, it includes an angled nib holder that makes it easy to tilt to the right for right-handers. Even if the slant barrel isn’t useful to you, this set is still a great package and includes 12 milliliters of rich black acrylic ink, pen cleaner, 1.3 millimeter marker, 50-sheet practice pad, and the complete Speedball manual.

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Buy: Speedball Complete Calligraphy Kit

2. Cretacolor Calligraphy Set

German art supply company Cretacolor makes an admirable no-frills western calligraphy set with high-quality materials. The sleek black pen comes with three flat tips ranging from 1.1 millimeters to 1.9 millimeters and six ink cartridges in black, blue, red and green. Unlike other sets that are designed to be discarded in favor of a more enjoyable set once the learner has mastered the basics, this one can last and grow with you. The included ink converter makes it easy to refill with the ink of your choice.

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Buy: Cretacolor Calligraphy Set

3. Pilot Parallel Calligraphy Pen Set

While Western calligraphy pens have a single plate which has two prongs, between which ink flows, Pilot reinvented the shape by using two full plates laid on top of each other, with ink flowing between they. The result is a smooth writing experience and dramatic changes in line thickness. This set comes with four pens of varying nib widths, each with a single nib and a red ink cartridge and a black ink cartridge. Included cleaning tools keep sharp pens in top condition.

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Buy: Pilot Parallel Calligraphy Pen Set

4. Hajj Wafaa Arabic Calligraphy Set

There are many forms of Arabic and Persian calligraphy, but most feature dense black ink writing. A traditional tool is the kalam, which is a flat feather made from a cut and dried reed. It is also an accessible tool for all calligraphers trained in Western calligraphy pens, as it works similarly to a stiff italic nib. This kit comes with ten bamboo pens ranging from two to 15 millimeters in width, a soot black ink bottle, a sponge to control the amount of ink after dipping, a nib holder and a PU leather roller to safe transport.

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Buy: Hajj Wafaa Arabic Calligraphy Set

5. Kuretake Bimoji Brush Pen Set

For traditional Chinese and Japanese calligraphy, a brush must be used. But today, brush pens allow much of the same experience without the need for a separate ink well. This disposable set from Japanese company Kuretake includes a range of sizes of flexible brush tip markers with velvety black ink. One of the medium brushes has a brush head with separate bristles, which takes more practice to use, but can create visible brush strokes not possible with felt tip markers.

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Buy: Kuretake Bimoji Brush Pen Set

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sign of the times | Augustman Singapore https://logprotect.net/sign-of-the-times-augustman-singapore/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 09:53:34 +0000 https://logprotect.net/sign-of-the-times-augustman-singapore/ Signatures have the power to start and end wars. The Treaty of Versailles, which ends the First World War, is signed by Lloyd George, British Prime Minister. It also has the power to shape national destinies as King Edward VIII signed his abdication in 1936, paving the way for Queen Elizabeth II. In fact, the […]]]>

Signatures have the power to start and end wars. The Treaty of Versailles, which ends the First World War, is signed by Lloyd George, British Prime Minister. It also has the power to shape national destinies as King Edward VIII signed his abdication in 1936, paving the way for Queen Elizabeth II. In fact, the power of the humble pen is such that when Anne Frank accidentally threw her Montblanc fountain pen down the fireplace, she was so devastated that she wrote an “ode” to his pen, and the rest of his writings not only survived him, but endured to inform the national conscience.

According to Alexa Schilz, director of brand heritage, culture and sustainability, writing doesn’t just foster connection; expressing emotions like disagreement and love, but also mobilizes us as a society by promoting democracy and empowerment on a larger scale as catalysts for change through the power of writing. Indeed, often for nearly half a month’s rent or a month’s groceries, a Montblanc writing instrument with a 14-karat gold nib has the power to influence speech on a scale that has amortized over time. decades where the equivalent of approximately 1.6 billion plastic ballpoint pens end up in the trash each year in the continental United States alone.

Today, humans seem inextricably linked to their cellphones, tablets and other electronic communication devices and while it’s easy to dismiss the relevance of writing instruments in the digital age, Vincent Montalescot, EVP Marketing, quickly dismisses the idea that text messages are impersonal pixels, “nobody collects screenshots of emails or app messages, but you’d keep a nicely handwritten birthday card or letter.”

Montalescot then turns the table around with a question of “why do we collect these memories” which again turns the answer into a beacon of absolute clarity, “we keep the postcards because they are impermanent. You know they will last a while, but if you don’t store them properly, you will lose them. The fear of this loss makes you cherish these letters more. Montalescot further explains: “This means that there is no conflict with the digital world. Putting pen to paper brings a very unique emotion that you don’t get from pixels on a screen and it’s just reality. I don’t see a “challenge”, I see an opportunity. »

It’s all in the pen

Montblanc is one of the world’s preeminent manufacturers of writing instruments, if not the most preeminent. The Meisterstück, its emblematic pen created in 1924, is about to celebrate its centenary. and of those who have used them to share their imprint on humanity. Spread over 3 levels and 3600 m², Montblanc Haus, is a destination that tells the story of Montblanc from its founding days until today, and of the women and men who craft Montblanc writing instruments bringing to life the value and potential of writing and the ways in which it helps people reach their full potential and leave their mark on the world. In fact, world leaders from popes to CEOs have been photographed signing crucial documents using a Montblanc pen. (Think Barack Obama, Warren Buffett, the Dalai Lama, Pope Benedict.)

In fact, men of great importance and the equally remarkable documents they sign appreciate a fine writing instrument because nothing writes like a fountain pen. Even though technology has improved, the new fancy liquid ink rollerballs haven’t come close to the majesty and flair of such a pen. For those who use fountain pens daily, their beauty transcends their usefulness, it does more than just take ink from a reservoir and transfer it to paper, it does so in a way that makes note taking mundane. , for example, and makes it extraordinary. With little or no pressure, a good pen simply glides across the page.

With prices starting at “low” at $555 and reaching over a million, prices are largely dictated by the materials used for a pen’s body. While many of Montblanc’s writing instruments are rendered in resin or plastic, some of the special or high-art editions are decorated with precious metals, usually gold and even palladium, some even with mother-of-pearl treatments. lacquered. Yet when it comes to performance, all gentlemen will pay particular attention to one singular point of the utmost importance – the feather.

Most vintage fountain pens required 70 manual operations, today, even with new techniques and the rise of more efficient hand tools, Montblanc still takes 105 steps to make a handcrafted writing instrument. “The feather alone requires 35 manufacturing steps,” describes Montalescot. This distinctive metal part of the pen where the ink flows is solid gold with an iridium nib.

In the Nib Manufacture department, craftsmen work clinically. While today there is a mixture of genres, once only women were stationed there because they were the ones who had the quiet patience to perform the precise measurements in the manufacture of a feather. Nowadays, everyone is trained at every stage so as not to disrupt production, although only a handful remain expert at two of the most crucial stages.

Proud of the attention to detail, Montalescot says the process continues “until putting the pen to the paper and listening, even feeling what is happening on the paper. If the experience does not meet their standards, the process goes back to step one. Montblanc Haus truly expresses who we are.

The art of writing

For many fountain pen enthusiasts, the sine qua non of the genre is a model, typically vintage, with a flexible gold nib. Such a tip provides flexibility that takes advantage of the dexterity of the wearer where the pressure and angle of press allow the gold tines to spread out: the higher the pressure the wider the tines allowing more ink from flowing, thus widening the line; reduce the pressure and the teeth contract, leaving a finer line. At Haus, we learn that an extremely flexible “wet noodle” or nib in the hands of a skilled calligrapher can create extremely beautiful line variations. it’s that reminder of the pen’s humble beginnings, first in the form of nibs whose flexible tips were trimmed and split to form a perfect, yet primitive, “wet noodle”.

When pen makers like Montblanc perfected the art of making these nib tips out of metal, they revolutionized a whole new class of calligraphy, notably the Spencerian script, which originated with American accountant Platt Rogers Spencer, who in turn adapted the English Copperplate.

Unfortunately, schools in many developed countries have emphasized late cursive and calligraphy and Montalescot and Schill are eager to point out that Montblanc offers courses for underprivileged students and children. “There are more than 100 million children in the world who cannot write. There are even some who have already been on the internet but who have not yet had access to the written word. Montblanc will not be able to solve this problem, but we participate and support communities and NGOs in literary matters. Montblanc Haus has dedicated space and programs where we host classes from the school where they can experience different aspects of writing,” says EVP Marketing of Montblanc.

Ms. Schill echoes her sentiment: “The fact is, handwriting is something proven to manifest thought and foster creativity. As soon as children do not learn or understand the importance of this, they risk losing something vital to existence. What is particularly surprising is that the children we welcomed really appreciated the calligraphy course; many of them complained that they didn’t like their writing and the teacher worked with them to improve and you know that feeling you get when you like your signature? It’s a defining moment and I think the classes will at least give people the opportunity to have a signature they like.

Yes, it’s true, if you’re worried that your handwriting isn’t good enough to take advantage of the attributes of a fountain pen, rest assured: over time, the right pen can actually improve your handwriting, because it takes some discipline to hold such a writing instrument correctly, it gradually teaches your fingers to form smoother and more elegant curves.

inspire writing

“We envisioned creating a special home for the art of writing, a place where people could discover or rediscover the incredible power of handwriting and the creativity, imagination and emotion it brings. liberate in everyone. Montblanc Haus was conceived as a journey of discovery, told through the eyes of a company that has been at the heart of writing culture for over 115 years. We hope Montblanc Haus will become a meaningful landmark for Hamburg, a city so important to Montblanc’s history and identity, and for local communities and far-flung visitors to discover and enjoy,” says Nicolas Baretzki, CEO by Montblanc.

Throughout the Haus, visitors are invited to experience the wonder of handwriting in a very personal way. In addition, they can test Montblanc writing instruments and send postcards with their thoughts all over the world.

Montblanc Haus now open.

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Pairing: writing instruments and creative self-expression https://logprotect.net/pairing-writing-instruments-and-creative-self-expression/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 08:14:56 +0000 https://logprotect.net/pairing-writing-instruments-and-creative-self-expression/ Although pens are a readily available tool in the hands of all consumers around the world, they are still a crucial and valuable tool for artists and writers. Choosing the right pen for the right activity can unleash creativity, allow room for experimentation, and aid in the production of creative art forms. Using the right […]]]>

Although pens are a readily available tool in the hands of all consumers around the world, they are still a crucial and valuable tool for artists and writers. Choosing the right pen for the right activity can unleash creativity, allow room for experimentation, and aid in the production of creative art forms.

Using the right pen can make the creative process more relaxing and enjoyable. Likewise, not using the right stylus for a task can lead to frustration. On National Ballpoint Pen Day, BIC Cello research expert Erini Petratou shares recommendations on which types of pens are best for your next self-expression and creative activity.

  1. If you’re a writer looking to jot down thoughts and ideas on the go, a ballpoint pen is your best companion. Its smooth flow, light weight and various color options will enhance your writing experience. Creative supervisor and renowned writer from Mumbai, Puneet Mehrashared his thoughts on ballpoint pens stating: “I prefer to use a ballpoint pen for writing because they are easy to handle, write smoothly, and most importantly, the possibility of ink smearing is greatly reduced.”
  2. Gel pens are an absolute must for line art and intricate illustrations. The fine tip and pronounced power ink make it an excellent choice for artwork and intricate detailing. Gel pens often feature a firm grip around the feed and thrust center of the barrel for better control and navigation. The variety of colors means these can be used for shading and producing 3D effects. Likewise, the high viscosity of gel pens allows for the effortless blending of colors and the creation of different shades. Illustrator and mandala artist from Kolkata, Titirsha Malcommented on the use of gel pens saying: “I used to draw my illustrations in black and white with black gel pens. The gel pens make the illustration sharper and the bold black helps achieve the look of the illustration.
  3. If you doodle constantly, rollerball pens are your go-to product. With their special tip and a fast, clean flow of ink, they are ideal for scribbling lines and abstract shapes. With rollerball pens, even if you hold the pen at an angle, the ink flow will remain the same. The ink in rollerball pens is also smudge-proof, making the experience inevitably seamless and stress-free.
  4. For art lovers who do calligraphy and like to draw sketches, fountain pens are the answer. Fountain pens are known for their high precision and smooth line. They also offer variation in line width – making them bold or thin by changing the angle of the pen – giving artists the ability to focus on detail. Ankur Mishra, author and founder of Kavishala, recalled his love for fountain pens because they enhanced the writing experience and made him feel more creative and deliberate with his thoughts. Similarly, when asked about her favorite type of pen for making mandalas, Chetna Singha mandala artist and art educator from Delhi, said: “I like to use refillable fountain pens. They also come in different nib sizes, which makes them perfect for creating mandala designs and details.

ABOUT BIC CELLO

BIC Cello, the manufacturer of Cello pens, is India’s market leader in writing instruments. The company is focused on developing innovative new products and ink flow systems, delivering significant value to customers’ writing experience. BIC Cello’s expanded portfolio now includes a range of world-class products including permanent markers, whiteboard markers, color markers, mechanical pencils, rollerball pens, fountain pens and stationery products for office and school. The company sells over five million pens a day and has a strong presence in over 70 countries around the world. BIC Cello’s strong and growing distribution network ensures that its products are accessible to all demographics and geographies.

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The Montblanc Haus in Hamburg celebrates the art of writing https://logprotect.net/the-montblanc-haus-in-hamburg-celebrates-the-art-of-writing/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 01:11:41 +0000 https://logprotect.net/the-montblanc-haus-in-hamburg-celebrates-the-art-of-writing/ In the new Montblanc Haus in Hamburg, a fascinating permanent exhibition showcases the craftsmanship of writing instrument manufacture and the enduring power of writing. While calligraphy is an increasingly rare ability that has always been a source of fascination for many, especially in modern times, the writing instrument itself tends to be overlooked. There is, […]]]>

In the new Montblanc Haus in Hamburg, a fascinating permanent exhibition showcases the craftsmanship of writing instrument manufacture and the enduring power of writing.

While calligraphy is an increasingly rare ability that has always been a source of fascination for many, especially in modern times, the writing instrument itself tends to be overlooked. There is, however, no denying the emotional connection between the pen and the owner. Some historical figures had such a love for their instruments that when Anne Frank accidentally threw her Montblanc fountain pen down the fireplace, she was so devastated that she wrote an ‘ode’ to it. Fortunately, the rest of his writings survived him.

According to Alexa Schilz, Montblanc’s Director of Heritage, Culture and Sustainability, writing not only fosters connection, but mobilizes us as a society on a larger scale as catalysts for change. However, not all writing tools are created equal. The equivalent of approximately 1.6 billion plastic ballpoint pens would end up in the trash every year in the continental United States.

Montblanc Great Characters The Beatles Limited Edition Pens

Defending the relevance of writing instruments in the digital age, Montblanc Executive Vice President of Marketing, Vincent Montalescot, says: “No one collects screenshots of emails or Whatsapp messages, but you would keep a beautifully handwritten birthday card or letter. We keep postcards because they are impermanent. You know they will last a while, but if you don’t store them properly, you will lose them. The fear of this loss makes you cherish these letters more.

“It means, he continues, that there is no conflict with the digital world. Putting pen to paper brings a very unique emotion that you don’t get from pixels on a screen, and that’s just reality. I don’t see a “challenge”; I see an opportunity.

Montblanc is one of the world’s preeminent manufacturers of writing instruments, if not the most preeminent. The Meisterstück, its emblematic pen created in 1924, is about to celebrate its centenary. Just in time to mark this milestone, the new Montblanc Haus, spanning three levels totaling 3,600 m², is located right next to the company’s headquarters and writing instrument manufacturing facility in his hometown of Hamburg.

The destination features a permanent exhibition that traces Montblanc’s heritage from its inception to the present day and offers insight into its design and production process, as well as the world of calligraphy, handwriting and writing. creative writing. There are more than 410 writing instruments, a writing workshop, behind-the-scenes showcases of its artisans and the making of its nibs, and the various inspiring figures who have left their mark on the world through writing. .

The architecture of Montblanc Haus is a tribute to a historic packaging design

On an exclusive trip to the Haus, we learn that Montblanc’s illustrious clients include world leaders such as Barack Obama, the Dalai Lama and Pope Benedict. Certainly, they appreciate a fine writing instrument, because nothing writes like a fountain pen. Even though the technology has improved, the sophisticated new liquid ink rollerballs have not come close to the majesty and flair of such a remarkable instrument.

Pricing, which starts at $555 but can reach over $1 million, is largely dictated by the materials used for a pen’s body. While many of Montblanc’s writing instruments are rendered in resin or plastic, some of the special or high-art editions are decorated with precious metals, usually gold and even palladium. Some are finished with lacquered mother-of-pearl. Yet when it comes to performance, all users will pay close attention to one singular point of the utmost importance: the nib.

Most vintage fountain pens required 70 manual operations to produce. Today, even with newer techniques and machinery, Montblanc still takes 105 steps to make a handcrafted writing instrument. “The feather alone requires 35 manufacturing steps,” describes Montalescot. This distinctive metal nib of the pen where the ink flows is solid gold with an iridium nib.

Although there is a mix of genders among the craftsmen in Montblanc’s nib making department today, only women were once stationed there because they were believed to possess the quiet patience to execute the precise measurements in the making. of the feather. Nowadays, everyone is trained at every stage so as not to disrupt production, although only a handful remain expert at two of the most crucial stages.

Original writings by iconic figures such as Ernest Hemingway and Frida Kahlo

Montalescot says the process continues “until you put pen to paper and listen, even feel what is happening on paper.” He says, “If the experience doesn’t meet their standards, the process goes back to step one. Montblanc Haus truly expresses who we are.

At Haus, we also learn that a “wet noodle” or extremely flexible nib in the hands of a skilled calligrapher can create beautiful line variations. It is reminiscent of the humble beginnings of the pen – in the form of nibs whose flexible tips have been sharpened and split to form a perfect yet primitive “wet noodle”. When pen makers like Montblanc perfected the art of making these nib tips out of metal, it revolutionized a whole new class of calligraphy, notably the Spencerian script developed by American accountant Platt Rogers Spencer.

Montblanc executives also point out that the company offers courses for underprivileged students and children. According to Montalescot, “There are more than 100 million children in the world who cannot write. There are some who have already been on the internet but who have not yet had access to writing. Montblanc will not be able to solve this problem but we participate and support communities and NGOs in literacy. Montblanc House has a dedicated space and programs where we organize classes in which children can discover different aspects of writing.

Inside the Montblanc house

Montblanc CEO Nicolas Baretzki explains the aims of the Haus: “We considered creating a special house for the art of writing; a place where people could discover or rediscover the incredible power of handwriting and the creativity, imagination and emotion it unleashes. Montblanc Haus was conceived as a journey of discovery, told through the eyes of a company that has been at the heart of writing culture for over 115 years. We hope it will become a significant landmark for Hamburg – a city so important to Montblanc’s history and identity, and to the enjoyment of local communities and far-flung visitors.

What also warms our hearts is that beyond the personal experience of the marvels of writing, visitors to the Haus are invited to test Montblanc writing instruments and send postcards in the whole world.

(All images: Montblanc)

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Oxford Mills students discover what life was like in the 1800s https://logprotect.net/oxford-mills-students-discover-what-life-was-like-in-the-1800s/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 23:08:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/oxford-mills-students-discover-what-life-was-like-in-the-1800s/ OXFORD MILLS, ON. – Students in south Ottawa took a trip back in time on Thursday to find out what school classrooms looked like 150 years ago, with the help of the local historical society. The school bell atop Maplewood Hall, once a one-room schoolhouse in Oxford Mills, welcomed Year 3 and Year 4 pupils […]]]>

OXFORD MILLS, ON. –

Students in south Ottawa took a trip back in time on Thursday to find out what school classrooms looked like 150 years ago, with the help of the local historical society.

The school bell atop Maplewood Hall, once a one-room schoolhouse in Oxford Mills, welcomed Year 3 and Year 4 pupils from Oxford on Rideau Public School, ready to experience what life would have been like on June 9, 1876.

“Just for today, we are in 1876, the year just after the school was built,” said Professor Steven Paterson.

Students learned about what life was like for Canadians in the 1700s and 1800s, and the old schoolhouse was the perfect backdrop for them to experience this in real life.

“The last couple of months have had students researching life at that time, so a big focus on what a school day was like, hobbies and what a curriculum would be like,” Paterson said.

Inside the room, cursive writing was taught with inkwells and calligraphy pens, and math was done with chalk and blackboards.

“It brings him to life,” Paterson said, pointing to a picture hanging on the wall of his grandfather, who attended the school decades earlier. “You can look in a magazine or a textbook and see pictures, but that doesn’t mean anything until you can touch it and handle it, do something with it, like any subject or way of life.”

Students practice cursive writing using ink and calligraphy pens at Maplewood Hall in Oxford Mills, Ontario. (Nate Vandermeer/CTV News Ottawa)

Paterson contacted the North Grenville Historical Society to see if they would be interested in bringing back 1876 for the day, and they jumped at the chance.

“This historical society has just offered a children’s program and this was a perfect opportunity to launch it,” said Kerrie Kossatz, treasurer of the North Grenville Historical Society.

“At the moment, they are my guinea pigs today, but it seems to be going well! She smiled.

“It’s great working knowledge,” Kossatz said. “Kids today, everything seems so disposable where we throw our clothes away and it’s great to see that maybe they can learn to mend their clothes, reuse them, recycle them. It’s great to see older things come to light now.”

Some students like Mackenzie Paterson and Emery Wilson, even dressing the role.

“We did a lot of research and for two months we researched what to wear,” Paterson said.

“My mom had this (dress) from a play when she was younger, so I just wore it,” Wilson added.

“That was another area of ​​interest was clothing,” the teacher added. “How students and teachers were dressed at the time so students were encouraged to dress up and many were very excited about it and as you can see they did.”

Outside, the class was shown historic games at recess such as duck on a rock, hoop rolling, hopscotch and marbles.

Even through the rain showers, the children had fun learning the games.

“We joked about it,” Paterson said. “I said this morning there will be a snow storm or a blizzard or rain, you have to go to school one way or another. We are traveling on foot and we took advantage of it to the max!”

Students also learned how to sew and make bannock, a quick flatbread that doesn’t need time to rise.

Gwenda Lemoine exhibits antique artifacts at Maplewood Hall in Oxford Mills, Ontario. (Nate Vandermeer/CTV News Ottawa)

Gwenda Lemoine, who has a granddaughter in the class, brought historical items to show and tell like a bed warmer and a butter press.

“They know a bit of history,” Lemoine said. “I ran them over the bed warmer, but they had good answers! »

“I just think it’s fantastic, really, that they’re going into this initiative to try to replicate what it was back then,” she said.

“It’s just old stuff that kids might be interested in. I’ve always loved the story and I think it’s great that Mr. P is doing this,” she said. “I wish more people would because it’s important for kids to know where they’re from.”

Lemoine even brought her most prized possession: a musket ball her husband found while remodeling their 150-year-old log home.

“We thought it was from 1772 when we determined the circumference of the log in my house,” she said.

Grade 4 student Walter Hamilton said he learned how difficult it was to live and grow up in those times.

“They didn’t have a lot of money,” Hamilton said. “They only get two cents a day of work.”

Students play historical games during recess during a day at Maplewood Hall in Oxford Mills, Ontario. (Nate Vandermeer/CTV News Ottawa)

Paterson says the goal is to maintain the partnership and have an annual trip to the old school as part of the lesson.

“Learning should be fun and it’s good that they can learn from it and have fun with it,” he noted. “Hands-on real-life experience and just let them absorb it and let the memories begin today.”

“Seeing children come to life, if you had to do it in a classroom and read a textbook, of course it’s interesting, but it can get old and stale,” he added. “Knowing how much they’ve been looking forward to it for two months, asking about it, that’s great.”

However, even with their new knowledge of 1876, 4th grader Easton DeVries was quick to answer whether he enjoys being in a class like this every day.

“Nope!” he smiled.

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The digital age robs us of this crucial tradition https://logprotect.net/the-digital-age-robs-us-of-this-crucial-tradition/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:20:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/the-digital-age-robs-us-of-this-crucial-tradition/ I type like a demon, but give me a greeting card to write and I might make a mistake. I’m going to transpose two characters or make an “o” look like an “a” and I have to fake it. If I’m really stuck, I might write “oops” above the error. Not that my handwriting was […]]]>

I type like a demon, but give me a greeting card to write and I might make a mistake. I’m going to transpose two characters or make an “o” look like an “a” and I have to fake it. If I’m really stuck, I might write “oops” above the error. Not that my handwriting was ever particularly neat, but that’s not a cleanliness issue. This is because I write so little by hand and use keyboards so much, putting pen to paper is kind of inconvenient for my QWERTY trained fingers. Given that younger generations have grown up with smartphones and social media, using or seeing very little cursive script during their day, is writing on the wall for, well, writing?

Maybe. Exam regulator Ofqual has announced it is exploring an online ‘pen-down’ approach for GCSE and A-levels. However, some research suggests it could be a mistake to let it slip away from school work entirely. In one study, when students were asked to take notes on a laptop, they tended to type everything verbatim, while those taking notes by hand were forced to be more selective, allowing them to understand the material better and remember it better.

Another study looked at people completing a detailed schedule, some entering information digitally, others using a laptop. For this type of task, handwriting was not only found to be faster and more accurate, but the process also activated several brain regions associated with memory more robustly.

Science aside, there’s something pretty special about seeing someone’s thoughts written in their own hand. I hadn’t spoken in ages to a school friend who has lived in the United States her entire adult life — until she reconnected with me after reading this column from her base in Washington.

While she hailed the marvels of digital communication that had enabled us to leapfrog decades of radio silence with a few quick clicks, she also spoke fondly of the letters we used to exchange as young teenagers. when she left the English countryside for New York. How they were a lifesaver. A link to the house. One of her other British friends, who had corresponded with her longer than I, kept all their letters. They plan to meet when they are old to read them all and relive their first anxieties, loves and adventures.

It’s almost as if a person’s spirit exists in their writing, their personality intrinsically tied to those traits on a page. The styling decisions they made. Whether their a’s are round like apples or crisp and thin. Whether their writing is restrained and economical or showy with a flourish. The writing is as individual as a fingerprint. And it’s always nice to get a handwritten envelope – am I the only one staring at the ones that come in, not opening them until I’ve managed to put a name to the script?

My friend from America also told me that now her mother is dead, seeing her handwriting seems particularly important to me. I understand. Every time I find something my parents wrote, no matter how monotonous, the effect warms my heart. And in the attic nestles a small trunk of letters my mum and dad exchanged when dad was a young boy on a minesweeper during the war and based in India. The paper is so light, so translucent, it’s as if they were written on butterfly wings flying back and forth across the ocean between them. Whispers through the air through the storms of battle.

My father, who left school at 14, then taught himself to write on copper, which has a distinctly Dickensian appearance. He’s used it all his life, even though he was just writing a bet on the back of a pack of cigarettes. “Thin, thick,” he said. I just watched a real-time copper calligraphy YouTube video and it’s almost meditative. Even the sound is soothing. Indeed, Montblanc puts each of its iconic Meisterstück pens through a series of rigorous quality checks, the last requiring experts to listen to the sound the nib makes on paper, with only those deemed smooth and not rough passing the test.

So what manuscripts will my generation, and those much younger, leave behind? Not a lot. We may have composed millions of emails and billions of social media posts, but there will be very little of our footprint on a page. Let’s face it, when I’m dead and gone, my WhatsApp group chats aren’t really going to touch the heart.

Perhaps, then, I should consider putting pen to paper on special occasions or to record key memories. Record your thoughts in a beautiful leather book. Take my time not to mess this up and speak from my heart. Something with a little more seriousness than a line of gritted-toothed emojis. Lol.


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Tech Review: Remarkable 2 mimics writing on paper. Is it better than an iPad for taking notes? | https://logprotect.net/tech-review-remarkable-2-mimics-writing-on-paper-is-it-better-than-an-ipad-for-taking-notes/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 08:15:00 +0000 https://logprotect.net/tech-review-remarkable-2-mimics-writing-on-paper-is-it-better-than-an-ipad-for-taking-notes/ Note takers, this review is aimed directly at you. Handwriting seems to be on the decline, but if you’re someone who buys yellow notepads in bulk and can tell what kind of pen you’re using just by the feel of ink on paper, you’ll want to grab a look at an electronic writing tablet I […]]]>

Note takers, this review is aimed directly at you.

Handwriting seems to be on the decline, but if you’re someone who buys yellow notepads in bulk and can tell what kind of pen you’re using just by the feel of ink on paper, you’ll want to grab a look at an electronic writing tablet I tested called the Remarkable 2 ($399 at remarkable.com ).

This tablet looks like a Kindle and an iPad got together and had a very skinny baby. It has some of the best features of Kindles and iPads, but it’s unlike either.

It’s very limited in what it can do, and that’s by design.

The differences between other tablets and e-readers and the Remarkable 2 are key to understanding if it’s right for you.

There’s one big caveat: most of the features you’ll need are dependent on a monthly subscription. If you choose not to subscribe, you are limiting functionality, which I will discuss below.

What does it do?

The main function of the Remarkable 2 is to take handwritten notes.

Creating notebooks is a breeze, and you can use templates that display in the background on your pages. Want to write on grid paper, lined notebook paper or a weekly planner? There are templates for this. There are even templates for writing music or calligraphy and grids for perspective drawing.

Once you’ve filled out a page, just swipe your finger from right to left across the screen and you’ll get a new page.

Ratings can be changed. You can select sections of a page and move them around. You can add or remove pages or entire notebooks.

There’s eight gigabytes of built-in storage, and you can’t add more, but you can sync your laptops with phone, tablet, computer, and several cloud services, including Remarkable’s own cloud storage.

If you’ve enabled Wi-Fi and cloud syncing, you can email pages from your notebooks to any email address.

You can also import files to Remarkable 2.

You can transfer PDF files, unprotected e-book files, and JPG and PNG graphics.

You can also use Remarkable to read web pages, but not in the traditional way.

There’s a Google Chrome extension that lets you send a webpage to the tablet, but you don’t get the whole page, just the text with no graphics, links, photos, or ads.

It is ideal for reading long stories.

For long PDFs or e-books, there are no page forward or page back buttons. You swipe across the screen to change pages.

You can use the pencil to annotate PDFs for other files you have on the tablet.

What he can’t do

While the Remarkable 2 can connect to Wi-Fi or your computer via USB-C for the purpose of importing or exporting content, it doesn’t have a browser or apps.

It’s not trying to be an iPad or a Kindle.

You can’t check email, surf the web, load your Kindle books, listen to music, or watch videos.

This is a device that wants you to focus on creating or playing.

Everything on screen

The Remarkable’s 10.3-inch grayscale display has a resolution of 1,872 by 1,404 pixels.

This is an e-ink display (similar to a Kindle) with no backlight. It needs a light source shining on it to work. It also performs wonderfully in the brightest sunlight.

The glass screen isn’t smooth – it has a very light texture, which is key to giving you the feeling that you’re actually drawing on paper. It even feels a bit rough when writing, like pencil on paper.

I have an iPad with an Apple Pencil for comparison, and the Remarkable 2’s writing surface is superior.

The user can choose from eight different pens, pencils and brushes with three line weights. Whether you choose a brush or a calligraphy pen, the screen has 4,096 levels of pressure sensitivity and tilt detection, so lines get thicker the harder you press.

The Remarkable 2 needs markers to work, and they are not included with the tablet.

There are two models, one with an eraser and one without. Both write the same and have replaceable nibs. Neither needs a battery. I tested both, and found the marker with the eraser useful enough to recommend buying it.

Battery life and other specifications

The Remarkable 2 has a 3,000 milliamp-hour battery that lasts about two weeks with moderate use. The tablet has a USB-C port for charging and syncing data.

It has 2.4 gigahertz and 5 GHz Wi-Fi for connecting to cloud services.

The tablet measures 7.3 x 9.68 x 0.18 inches and weighs 14.2 ounces.

This is the thinnest tablet I have ever used. It couldn’t be thinner and have a USB-C port.

Desktop and mobile apps

Once you’ve created notebooks, you’ll want to get the files to your computer or mobile device. There are notable apps for Windows, MacOS, iOS, and Android. When you purchase the Remarkable tablet, you create an account used to sign in to the tablet and your desktop or mobile apps.

Once the notebooks are synced, you can print them, save them locally, or email them like any other file.

Connect subscription

The Remarkable 2 sells a service called Connect with two subscription tiers.

Maps are a big part of the tablet’s functionality, so let’s go in-depth on what they offer.

Connect ($7.99 per month) is the full-service subscription that includes unlimited cloud storage and syncs all your laptops with any of the Remarkable desktop apps (phone, computer, web) through the Remarkable Cloud service.

You can also sync your notes with Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or Dropbox. My tablet syncs with OneDrive and the sync is perfect as long as you have a Wi-Fi connection.

Connect also offers handwriting to editable text conversion. If your handwriting can be deciphered (i.e. it’s not a scratch), you can choose to turn your handwritten notes into text. Unfortunately, the text is not searchable.

You can export any (or all) of your notebook pages via email. The messaging interface is a bit clunky, but it works. You enter the email address with an on-screen keyboard, then you can type any message, name the attachment, and choose which pages to send.

The Connect subscription also includes screen sharing, which allows you to see a notebook displayed on a computer screen and show yourself drawing on it in real time. This shared screen can be presented in videoconference from services like Zoom or Microsoft Teams. It reminds me of sharing a whiteboard.

The Connect subscription also extends the warranty of your tablet and its accessories to 36 months, as long as the subscription is active.

Connect Lite ($4.99 per month) includes unlimited Remarkable cloud synchronization between your tablet and all your devices.

It does not include third-party cloud services, handwriting conversion, screen sharing, email export, or warranty extension.

If you choose No Plan (which is an option), you can sync your laptops with desktop or mobile apps, but the storage isn’t unlimited. If you don’t open a laptop for more than 50 days, it’s purged of noteworthy cloud and desktop/mobile apps, but still stays on your tablet.

The ability to import unprotected PDF and e-pub files and the ability to export web pages from Chrome are available on all plans (including No Plan). You need to install the Chrome extension separately on your computer.

Pricing

The tablet itself costs $399.

The plus marker with eraser is $129 and the regular marker is $79.

There are two protection sheets.

An envelope-style folio in a gray polymer weave costs $79 and has a dedicated storage pocket for markers.

A book folio is available in the Polymer Gray weave for $129. There are premium brown or black leather book folios for $169.

The book folios are beautiful, but they don’t have marker storage. The markers have magnets to attach to the side of the tablet, but I’d worry about losing one with no place to store it.

There’s a budget plan with the tablet and a three-month prepaid Connect subscription for $299, which is a $100 discount on the device. The bundle also includes a $50 accessory credit for accessories purchased at the same time.

Worth the price?

The Remarkable 2 with the folio and marker plus will cost you just over $600, plus an additional $96 per year for Connect.

You can certainly buy an iPad with an Apple Pencil for less, and no subscription is required.

Is the price difference worth it?

I love the Remarkable’s note-taking functionality and the feel of the on-screen marker. Sync works great, but other features like file import and Read on Remarkable seem a bit crude.

Remarkable wants to separate the note-taking experience from the distractions of other tablet features like web browsing, and it does a good job.

If you’re really into handwriting (like my wife) and can afford it, the Remarkable 2 is a great addition.

I’m not thrilled with the subscription cost, but hopefully there will be added features and improvements periodically that will justify the extra cost.

Pros: Fantastic writing experience, easy syncing, nice material, and very thin but solid.

Cons: Limited file formats can be imported, subscription to unlock best features, no stylus included.

Bottom line: A great tablet for note takers to replace legal notebooks, but other features need to be refined.

Jim Rossman writes for The Dallas Morning News. He can be reached at jrossman@dallasnews.com.

© 2022 The Dallas Morning News. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Crossword: Find out why the age-old art of calligraphy is still so popular https://logprotect.net/crossword-find-out-why-the-age-old-art-of-calligraphy-is-still-so-popular/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 04:30:35 +0000 https://logprotect.net/crossword-find-out-why-the-age-old-art-of-calligraphy-is-still-so-popular/ In the resolutely digital age, it’s safe to say that more and more people are rediscovering the therapeutic effect of putting pen to paper. A simple quick search on Instagram shows millions of results, from both professional calligraphers and aspiring calligraphers, as they take mundane phrases, famous quotes or bits of poetry and bring them […]]]>

In the resolutely digital age, it’s safe to say that more and more people are rediscovering the therapeutic effect of putting pen to paper. A simple quick search on Instagram shows millions of results, from both professional calligraphers and aspiring calligraphers, as they take mundane phrases, famous quotes or bits of poetry and bring them to life on paper.

Calligraphy is by no means a new art form. In the Arab world, calligraphy has existed since the time of Ali Ibn Muqla, an official or vizier of the Abbasid Caliphate (around 860). He is responsible for creating a system of proportions for Arabic script, developing and extending formal structural thought to cursive forms. Legend has it that when political rivals cut off Ibn Muqla’s right hand, he continued to write, with a pen strapped to his arm!

In China and Japan, calligraphy developed somewhat differently. Known as brush calligraphy, the focus at all times is on finding balance. The act of putting brush to paper is considered a performance, or a dance, with smooth, flowing movements.

In the case of Europe, calligraphy first appeared in Latin script around 600 BC, in Rome, Italy. It was used to copy religious texts and continued to evolve until the introduction of the printing press in the 15th century saw a decline in manuscript works.

Today, calligraphy is seen more as a conscious art exercise. It involves regular breathing, concentration and mindfulness – all aspects that have a restorative impact on our well-being. A 2011 study in the journal Clinical Interventions in Aging found that calligraphy therapy improved cognitive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment.

The physical exertion of calligraphy also has wonderful benefits. A 2014 study in the journal Psychology Research and Behavior Management found that practicing Chinese calligraphic writing, in particular, leads to a decrease in an individual’s heart rate and an increase in skin temperature – the same calming effects that people find in meditation.

]]>
Remarkable 2 imitates writing on paper. Is it better than an iPad for taking notes? https://logprotect.net/remarkable-2-imitates-writing-on-paper-is-it-better-than-an-ipad-for-taking-notes/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 11:00:33 +0000 https://logprotect.net/remarkable-2-imitates-writing-on-paper-is-it-better-than-an-ipad-for-taking-notes/ Note takers, this review is aimed directly at you. Handwriting seems to be on the decline, but if you’re someone who buys yellow notepads in bulk and can tell what kind of pen you’re using just by the feel of ink on paper, you’ll want to grab a look at an electronic writing tablet I […]]]>

Note takers, this review is aimed directly at you.

Handwriting seems to be on the decline, but if you’re someone who buys yellow notepads in bulk and can tell what kind of pen you’re using just by the feel of ink on paper, you’ll want to grab a look at an electronic writing tablet I tested called the Remarkable 2 ($399 at remarkable.com).

This tablet looks like a Kindle and an iPad got together and had a very skinny baby. It has some of the best features of Kindles and iPads, but it’s unlike either.

It’s very limited in what it can do, and that’s by design.

The differences between other tablets and e-readers and the Remarkable 2 are key to understanding if it’s right for you.

There’s one big caveat: most of the features you’ll need are dependent on a monthly subscription. If you choose not to subscribe, you are limiting functionality, which I will discuss below.

What does it do?

The main function of the Remarkable 2 is to take handwritten notes.

Creating notebooks is a breeze, and you can use templates that display in the background on your pages. Want to write on grid paper, lined notebook paper or a weekly planner? There are templates for this. There are even templates for writing music or calligraphy and grids for perspective drawing.

Once you’ve filled out a page, just swipe your finger from right to left across the screen and you’ll get a new page.

You can sort notebooks and sync them to the cloud.

Ratings can be changed. You can select sections of a page and move them around. You can add or remove pages or entire notebooks.

There’s eight gigabytes of built-in storage, and you can’t add more, but you can sync your laptops with phone, tablet, computer, and several cloud services, including Remarkable’s own cloud storage.

If you’ve enabled Wi-Fi and cloud syncing, you can email pages from your notebooks to any email address.

You can also import files to Remarkable 2.

You can transfer PDF files, unprotected e-book files, and JPG and PNG graphics.

You can also use Remarkable to read web pages, but not in the traditional way.

There’s a Google Chrome extension that lets you send a webpage to the tablet, but you don’t get the whole page, just the text with no graphics, links, photos, or ads.

It is ideal for reading long stories.

For long PDFs or e-books, there are no page forward or page back buttons. You swipe across the screen to change pages.

You can use the pencil to annotate PDFs for other files you have on the tablet.

What he can’t do

While the Remarkable 2 can connect to Wi-Fi or your computer via USB-C for the purpose of importing or exporting content, it doesn’t have a browser or apps.

It’s not trying to be an iPad or a Kindle.

You can’t check email, surf the web, load your Kindle books, listen to music, or watch videos.

This is a device that wants you to focus on creating or playing.

Everything on screen

The Remarkable’s 10.3-inch grayscale display has a resolution of 1,872 by 1,404 pixels.

This is an e-ink display (similar to a Kindle) with no backlight. It needs a light source shining on it to work. It also performs wonderfully in the brightest sunlight.

The glass screen isn’t smooth – it has a very light texture, which is key to giving you the feeling that you’re actually drawing on paper. It even feels a bit rough when writing, like pencil on paper.

I have an iPad with an Apple Pencil for comparison, and the Remarkable 2’s writing surface is superior.

The user can choose from eight different pens, pencils and brushes with three line weights. Whether you choose a brush or a calligraphy pen, the screen has 4,096 levels of pressure sensitivity and tilt detection, so lines get thicker the harder you press.

You can choose from eight different types of pens.
You can choose from eight different types of pens.

The Remarkable 2 needs markers to work, and they are not included with the tablet.

There are two models, one with an eraser and one without. Both write the same and have replaceable nibs. Neither needs a battery. I tested both, and found the marker with the eraser useful enough to recommend buying it.

Battery life and other specifications

The Remarkable 2 has a 3,000 milliamp-hour battery that lasts about two weeks with moderate use. The tablet has a USB-C port for charging and syncing data.

It has 2.4 gigahertz and 5 GHz Wi-Fi for connecting to cloud services.

The tablet measures 7.3 x 9.68 x 0.18 inches and weighs 14.2 ounces.

This is the thinnest tablet I have ever used. It couldn’t be thinner and have a USB-C port.

Desktop and mobile apps

Once you’ve created notebooks, you’ll want to get the files to your computer or mobile device. There are notable apps for Windows, MacOS, iOS, and Android. When you purchase the Remarkable tablet, you create an account used to sign in to the tablet and your desktop or mobile apps.

Notebook pages sync with mobile devices and computers through the reMarkable app.
Notebook pages sync with mobile devices and computers through the reMarkable app.

Once the notebooks are synced, you can print them, save them locally, or email them like any other file.

Connect subscription

The Remarkable 2 sells a service called Connect with two subscription tiers.

Maps are a big part of the tablet’s functionality, so let’s go in-depth on what they offer.

Connect ($7.99 per month) is the full-service subscription that includes unlimited cloud storage and syncs all your laptops with any of the Remarkable desktop apps (phone, computer, web) through the Remarkable Cloud service.

You can also sync your notes with Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or Dropbox. My tablet syncs with OneDrive and the sync is perfect as long as you have a Wi-Fi connection.

Notebooks can sync with cloud services.
Notebooks can sync with cloud services.

Connect also offers handwriting to editable text conversion. If your handwriting can be deciphered (i.e. it’s not a scratch), you can choose to turn your handwritten notes into text. Unfortunately, the text is not searchable.

You can export any (or all) of your notebook pages via email. The messaging interface is a bit clunky, but it works. You enter the email address with an on-screen keyboard, then you can type any message, name the attachment, and choose which pages to send.

The Connect subscription also includes screen sharing, which allows you to see a notebook displayed on a computer screen and show yourself in real time drawing on it. This shared screen can be presented in videoconference from services like Zoom or Microsoft Teams. It reminds me of sharing a whiteboard.

The Connect subscription also extends the warranty of your tablet and its accessories to 36 months, as long as the subscription is active.

Connect Lite ($4.99 per month) includes unlimited Remarkable cloud synchronization between your tablet and all your devices.

It does not include third-party cloud services, handwriting conversion, screen sharing, email export, or warranty extension.

If you choose No Plan (which is an option), you can sync your laptops with desktop or mobile apps, but the storage isn’t unlimited. If you don’t open a laptop for more than 50 days, it’s purged of noteworthy cloud and desktop/mobile apps, but still stays on your tablet.

The ability to import unprotected PDF and e-pub files and the ability to export web pages from Chrome are available on all plans (including No Plan). You need to install the Chrome extension separately on your computer.

Pricing

The tablet itself costs $399.

The plus marker with eraser is $129 and the regular marker is $79.

The reMarkable 2 has two different markers, one features an eraser.
The reMarkable 2 has two different markers, one features an eraser.

There are two protection sheets.

An envelope-style folio in a gray polymer weave costs $79 and has a dedicated storage pocket for markers.

A book folio is available in the Polymer Gray weave for $129. There are premium brown or black leather book folios for $169.

The book folios are beautiful, but they don’t have marker storage. The markers have magnets to attach to the side of the tablet, but I’d worry about losing one with no place to store it.

There’s a budget plan with the tablet and a three-month prepaid Connect subscription for $299, which is a $100 discount on the device. The bundle also includes a $50 accessory credit for accessories purchased at the same time.

Worth the price?

The Remarkable 2 with the folio and marker plus will cost you just over $600, plus an additional $96 per year for Connect.

You can certainly buy an iPad with an Apple Pencil for less, and no subscription is required.

Is the price difference worth it?

I love the Remarkable’s note-taking functionality and the feel of the on-screen marker. Sync works great, but other features like file import and Read on Remarkable seem a bit crude.

Remarkable wants to separate the note-taking experience from the distractions of other tablet features like web browsing, and it does a good job.

If you’re really into handwriting (like my wife) and can afford it, the Remarkable 2 is a great addition.

I’m not thrilled with the subscription cost, but hopefully there will be added features and improvements periodically that will justify the extra cost.

Advantages: Fantastic writing experience, easy syncing, nice material and very thin but solid.

The inconvenients: Limited file formats can be imported, subscription to unlock best features, no stylus included.

At the end of the line : A great tablet for note takers to replace legal notepads, but other features need to be refined.

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My daughter’s calluses may be the last signs of a dying art https://logprotect.net/my-daughters-calluses-may-be-the-last-signs-of-a-dying-art/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 14:22:38 +0000 https://logprotect.net/my-daughters-calluses-may-be-the-last-signs-of-a-dying-art/ The writer is the FT’s pop critic It’s exam season and my daughter has two calluses on her writing hand. She sits her GCSE, the qualifications most UK schoolchildren get at 15 or 16. Calluses are the result of weeks of review, measured in reams of paper crammed with French phrases, historical events, mathematical calculations […]]]>

The writer is the FT’s pop critic

It’s exam season and my daughter has two calluses on her writing hand. She sits her GCSE, the qualifications most UK schoolchildren get at 15 or 16. Calluses are the result of weeks of review, measured in reams of paper crammed with French phrases, historical events, mathematical calculations and descriptions of how photosynthesis works – all carefully crafted by her, like a diligent medieval monk in the scriptorium of his attic room.

Schooling is the last redoubt of handwriting on an industrial scale. While the rest of us tap away at screens and keyboards, students continue to rely on the neatly curled letters and hasty squiggles of their calligraphy. My daughter’s calluses exemplify the stubborn endurance of a physical act that dates back to the very dawn of human civilization, when our ancestors transitioned from nomadic hunting-gathering to living in agricultural colonies. “Between my finger and my thumb/The stubby pen rests./I’ll ​​dig with it,” as Seamus Heaney said in his 1966 poem, “Digging.”

But the school stronghold of handwriting is under siege. Online learning during the pandemic has highlighted an educational world in which computerized typing could replace calligraphy. The exams go in the same direction. UK assessment regulator Ofqual recently announced plans to replace pen and paper with online testing. The next generation of school children are at risk of repetitive strain injuries from overuse of the keyboard, not calluses from holding a pen.

Romantics will watch these developments with dismay. Handwriting is a personalized form of writing. The idea underlying graphology, that you can distinguish a character by writing, may be as wrong as phrenology, the idea that a person’s psychology can be guessed by the structure of their skull. But there is some truth in that. Your writing is unique to you.

In a school setting, handwriting symbolizes the personal conditioning a student brings to their learning. This interpretative aspect goes against the trend of British education policy. The national curriculum became Gradgrindian during my daughter’s schooling, treating knowledge as utilitarian information to be memorized and regurgitated. Having students write on computers is a logical extension of treating them like computers.

Rationalists will dismiss all of this as soft-headed nonsense. They will cite the arrival of typewriters in the 19th century as an example of the social progress that mechanical writing can bring. The proportion of female typists grew rapidly in the United States from the 1880s, reaching a near-total takeover of the workforce by 1930. Granted, much of their work consisted of transcribing the words of men – but the machine nevertheless opened up office jobs to my daughter’s ancestors.

Typewriters also had an effect on personal style. One of the first to adopt it was the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, who switched from handwriting to typing in 1881 due to eyesight problems. He finds himself adopting a different register, more clipped and telegrammatic than his handwritten prose. “Our writing tools also work on our thoughts,” he observed.

If so, then my thoughts have been digitally reprogrammed. I use a computer to write. The only time I return to handwriting is at concerts, doodling in a notebook in the dark – a preference that marks me as the Methuselah of pop critics. Younger guild members use their phones to take notes, fingers dancing on bright screens. I’m too clumsy to do the same.

For me, handwriting has mostly become a way to communicate with myself. But it is an ineffective form of self-communion. A lot of notes I take during concerts turn out to be indecipherable. If my daughter’s calluses symbolize the stubborn survival of handwriting, then my semi-legible notes portend an ominous future. When pens are banned from schools, all that will remain is a shaky retreat into private writing, with a readership that leans inexorably towards no one.

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